bounce


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bounce

 (bouns)
v. bounced, bounc·ing, bounc·es
v.intr.
1. To rebound after having struck an object or a surface.
2. To move jerkily; bump: The car bounced over the potholes.
3. To bound: children bouncing into the room.
4. To be left unpaid because of an overdrawn account: a check that bounced.
5. Computers To be sent back by a mail server as undeliverable: That email bounced because I used "com" instead of "net."
6. Baseball To hit a ground ball to an infielder: The batter bounced out to the shortstop.
v.tr.
1. To cause to strike an object or a surface and rebound: bounce a ball on the sidewalk.
2. To present or propose for comment or approval. Often used with off: bounced a few ideas off my boss.
3. Slang
a. To expel by force: bounced him from the bar.
b. To dismiss from employment. See Synonyms at dismiss.
4. To write (a check) on an overdrawn bank account.
n.
1.
a. A rebound, as of a ball from the ground.
b. A sudden bound or upward movement: The bike went over the rock with a bounce.
c. The capacity to rebound; spring: a ball with bounce.
d. A sudden increase: got a bounce in the polls.
2. Cheerfulness or liveliness: "He had managed to recover much of his bounce and spirit" (Paul Auster).
3. Slang Expulsion; dismissal: was given the bounce from the job.
4.
a. A fast, energetic style of hip-hop originating in New Orleans and characterized by repetitive, often sexual call-and-response lyrics.
b. A style of dance performed to this music characterized by rapid body movements, especially of the gluteal and hamstring muscles in a way that resembles bouncing while keeping the feet on the ground.
5. Chiefly British Loud, arrogant speech; bluster.
Phrasal Verb:
bounce back
To recover quickly, as from a setback: The patient bounced back to good health.

[Probably from Middle English bounsen, to beat.]

bounce

(baʊns)
vb
1. (intr) (of an elastic object, such as a ball) to rebound from an impact
2. (tr) to cause (such an object) to hit a solid surface and spring back
3. to rebound or cause to rebound repeatedly
4. to move or cause to move suddenly, excitedly, or violently; spring: she bounced up from her chair.
5. (Banking & Finance) slang (of a bank) to send (a cheque) back or (of a cheque) to be sent back unredeemed because of lack of funds in the drawer's account
6. (Computer Science) (of an internet service provider) to send (an email message) back or (of an email message) to be sent back to the sender, for example because the recipient's email account is full
7. (tr) slang to force (a person) to leave (a place or job); throw out; eject
8. (tr) Brit to hustle (a person) into believing or doing something
n
9. the action of rebounding from an impact
10. a leap; jump; bound
11. the quality of being able to rebound; springiness
12. informal vitality; vigour; resilience
13. Brit swagger or impudence
14. informal a temporary increase or rise
15. (Australian Rules Football) the bounce Australian rules football the start of play at the beginning of each quarter or after a goal
16. get the bounce give the bounce informal US to dismiss or be dismissed from a job
17. on the bounce informal in succession; one after the other: they have lost nine games on the bounce.
[C13: probably of imitative origin; compare Low German bunsen to beat, Dutch bonken to thump]

bounce

(baʊns)

v. bounced, bounc•ing,
n., adv. v.i.
1. to strike a surface and rebound; spring back: The ball bounced once before she caught it.
2. to move or walk in a lively, exuberant, or energetic manner.
3. to move along repeatedly striking a surface and rebounding.
4. (of a check) to be refused payment by a bank, due to insufficient funds in the account.
v.t.
5. to cause to bound and rebound.
6. to refuse payment on (a check) because of insufficient funds.
7. Slang. to eject, expel, or dismiss summarily or forcibly.
8. bounce back, to recover quickly.
n.
9. a bound or rebound.
10. a sudden spring or leap.
11. ability to rebound; resilience.
12. vitality; energy; liveliness.
13. the bounce, Slang. a dismissal.
adv.
14. with a bounce; suddenly.
[1175–1225; Middle English buncin, bounsen]

bounce


Past participle: bounced
Gerund: bouncing

Imperative
bounce
bounce
Present
I bounce
you bounce
he/she/it bounces
we bounce
you bounce
they bounce
Preterite
I bounced
you bounced
he/she/it bounced
we bounced
you bounced
they bounced
Present Continuous
I am bouncing
you are bouncing
he/she/it is bouncing
we are bouncing
you are bouncing
they are bouncing
Present Perfect
I have bounced
you have bounced
he/she/it has bounced
we have bounced
you have bounced
they have bounced
Past Continuous
I was bouncing
you were bouncing
he/she/it was bouncing
we were bouncing
you were bouncing
they were bouncing
Past Perfect
I had bounced
you had bounced
he/she/it had bounced
we had bounced
you had bounced
they had bounced
Future
I will bounce
you will bounce
he/she/it will bounce
we will bounce
you will bounce
they will bounce
Future Perfect
I will have bounced
you will have bounced
he/she/it will have bounced
we will have bounced
you will have bounced
they will have bounced
Future Continuous
I will be bouncing
you will be bouncing
he/she/it will be bouncing
we will be bouncing
you will be bouncing
they will be bouncing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bouncing
you have been bouncing
he/she/it has been bouncing
we have been bouncing
you have been bouncing
they have been bouncing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bouncing
you will have been bouncing
he/she/it will have been bouncing
we will have been bouncing
you will have been bouncing
they will have been bouncing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bouncing
you had been bouncing
he/she/it had been bouncing
we had been bouncing
you had been bouncing
they had been bouncing
Conditional
I would bounce
you would bounce
he/she/it would bounce
we would bounce
you would bounce
they would bounce
Past Conditional
I would have bounced
you would have bounced
he/she/it would have bounced
we would have bounced
you would have bounced
they would have bounced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bounce - the quality of a substance that is able to reboundbounce - the quality of a substance that is able to rebound
elasticity, snap - the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed; "the waistband had lost its snap"
2.bounce - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwardsbounce - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards
jumping, jump - the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected"
capriole, caper - a playful leap or hop
pounce - the act of pouncing
3.bounce - rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)bounce - rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)
backlash, rebound, recoil, repercussion - a movement back from an impact
Verb1.bounce - spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"
kick back, recoil, kick - spring back, as from a forceful thrust; "The gun kicked back into my shoulder"
bound off, skip - bound off one point after another
carom - rebound after hitting; "The car caromed off several lampposts"
bound, jump, leap, spring - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
2.bounce - hit something so that it bounces; "bounce a ball"
bounce out - bounce a ball so that it becomes an out
hit - cause to move by striking; "hit a ball"
3.bounce - move up and down repeatedly
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
4.bounce - come back after being refused; "the check bounced"
return - go or come back to place, condition, or activity where one has been before; "return to your native land"; "the professor returned to his teaching position after serving as Dean"
bounce - refuse to accept and send back; "bounce a check"
clear - be debited and credited to the proper bank accounts; "The check will clear within 2 business days"
5.bounce - leap suddenly; "He bounced to his feet"
bound, jump, leap, spring - move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
6.bounce - refuse to accept and send back; "bounce a check"
pass up, turn down, decline, refuse, reject - refuse to accept; "He refused my offer of hospitality"
bounce - come back after being refused; "the check bounced"
7.bounce - eject from the premises; "The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club"
eject, turf out, boot out, chuck out, exclude, turn out - put out or expel from a place; "The unruly student was excluded from the game"

bounce

verb
1. rebound, return, thump, recoil, ricochet, spring back, resile The ball bounced past the right-hand post.
2. bound, spring, jump, leap, skip, caper, prance, gambol, jounce Moira bounced into the office.
3. force, drive, railroad (informal), coerce, strong-arm (informal), dragoon, press-gang The aim of the exercise is to bounce him into a coalition government.
4. (Slang) throw out, fire (informal), turn out, expel, oust, relegate, kick out (informal), drive out, eject, evict, boot out (informal), show someone the door, give someone the bum's rush (slang), throw out on your ear (informal) He was bounced from two programmes for unbecoming conduct.
noun
1. springiness, give, spring, bound, rebound, resilience, elasticity, recoil the pace and steep bounce of the pitch
2. (Informal) life, go (informal), energy, pep, sparkle, zip (informal), vitality, animation, vigour, exuberance, dynamism, brio, vivacity, liveliness, vim (slang), lustiness, vivaciousness the natural bounce of youth
bounce back recover, pick up, rally, take heart, be heartened, pull through, take a turn for the better, get back on your feet He is young enough to bounce back.

bounce

verb
1. To spring back after colliding with something:
2. To move in a lively way:
3. Slang. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
4. Slang. To end the employment or service of:
Informal: ax, fire, pink-slip.
Slang: boot, can, sack.
Idioms: give someone his or her walking papers, give someone the ax, give someone the gate, give someone the pink slip, let go, show someone the door.
noun
1. A lively, emphatic, eager quality or manner:
Informal: ginger, pep, peppiness.
Slang: oomph.
2. An act of bouncing or a bouncing movement:
3. A sudden lively movement:
5. The ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement:
6. Slang. The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: boot.
7. Slang. The act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed from employment:
Informal: ax.
Slang: boot, sack.
Translations
ارْتِداد، وَثْبَهطاقَه، قَوَّهيَرْتَدُ، يَثِبُيَرْتَدّيُعيدُ الشيك دون صَرْف
odrazitskokbýt vrácen bankouelánodraz
hoppekrafttilbagehopafvise
hyppiähyppyyttääkimmotapompottaapomppia
odbijati se
vitalitás
弾む
튀다
atmestiatšokimasatšoktienergijastiprus
atlēciensatlēktenerģijalēkātneapmaksātu atsūtīt atpakaļ
byť vrátený bankouodskok
odbitiodskočitiposkočiti
studsa
เด้ง
canlılıkenerjikarşılıksız çıkmaksıçra maksıçrama
nảy lên

bounce

[baʊns]
A. N
1. [of ball] → (re)bote m
to catch a ball on the bounceagarrar una pelota de rebote
2. (= springiness) [of hair, mattress] → elasticidad f
3. (fig) (= energy) → energía f, dinamismo m
he's got plenty of bouncetiene mucha energía
B. VT
1. [+ ball] → hacer (re)botar
to bounce a baby on one's kneehacer el caballito a un niño pequeño
to bounce radio waves off the moonhacer rebotar las ondas radiofónicas en la luna
to bounce one's ideas off sbexponer las ideas a algn para que dé su opinión
2. [+ cheque] → rechazar
3. (= eject) → plantar en la calle, poner de patitas en la calle
4. I will not be bounced into itno lo voy a hacer bajo presión, no voy a dejar que me presionen para hacerlo
C. VI
1. [ball] → (re)botar
2. [cheque] → ser rechazado
3. (= bound) → dar saltos
he bounced up out of his chairse levantó de la silla de un salto
he bounced inirrumpió alegremente
4. (= be returned) [e-mail message] → ser devuelto
bounce back VI + ADV (fig) [person] → recuperarse

bounce

[ˈbaʊns]
vi
[ball] → rebondir
[cheque] → être refusé (étant sans provision)
to bounce in [person] → entrer énergiquement
to bounce on sth [+ bed] → sauter sur qch
to bounce up and down → rebondir
vt
[+ ball] → faire rebondir
[+ cheque] → refuser
to bounce sb into doing sth (= force) → pousser qn à faire qch
n
(= rebound) [ball] → rebond m
(= vitality)
He's got plenty of bounce → Il est plein d'entrain., Il est plein d'allant.
bounce back
vi [team, competitor] → faire un retour en force

bounce

vi
(ball etc)springen; (Sport: ball) → aufspringen; (chins, breasts etc)wackeln; rubber bouncesGummi federt; the child bounced up and down on the beddas Kind hüpfte auf dem Bett herum; the car bounced along the bumpy roaddas Auto holperte die schlechte Straße entlang; he came bouncing into the roomer kam munter ins Zimmer; I gotta bounce (US sl) → ich mach nen Abgang (inf)
(inf, cheque) → platzen (inf)
vt
ballaufprallen lassen, prellen (Sport); laser beams, light, radio wavesreflektieren; he bounced the ball against the waller warf den Ball gegen die Wand; he bounced the baby on his kneeer ließ das Kind auf den Knien reiten
(inf) chequeplatzen lassen
(inf, = throw out) → rausschmeißen (inf)
(= coerce) to bounce somebody into doing somethingjdn dazu bringen, etw zu tun
n
(of ball: = rebound) → Aufprall m; to hit a ball on the bounceden Ball beim Aufprall nehmen; count the number of bounceszählen Sie, wie oft der Ball etc aufspringt
no pl (of ball)Sprungkraft f; (of hair also, rubber)Elastizität f; (inf, of person) → Schwung m (inf)

bounce

[baʊns]
1. n (of ball) → rimbalzo; (springiness, of hair, mattress) → elasticità
he's got plenty of bounce (fig) → è molto esuberante
2. vt (ball) → far rimbalzare
3. vi (ball) → rimbalzare; (child) → saltare, balzare (fam) (cheque) → essere scoperto/a or a vuoto
the cheque he gave me bounced (fam) → l'assegno che mi ha dato era scoperto (or a vuoto)
to bounce in → entrare di slancio or con foga
bounce back vi + adv (person) → riprendersi

bounce

(bauns) verb
1. to (cause to) spring or jump back from a solid surface.
2. (of a cheque) to be sent back unpaid, because of lack of money in a bank account.
noun
1. (of a ball etc) an act of springing back. With one bounce the ball went over the net.
2. energy. She has a lot of bounce.
ˈbouncing adjective
strong and lively. a bouncing baby.

bounce

يَرْتَدّ odrazit (se) hoppe springen αναπηδώ botar pomppia rebondir odbijati se rimbalzare 弾む 튀다 stuiteren sprette odbić się saltar подпрыгивать studsa เด้ง zıplamak nảy lên 反弹
References in classic literature ?
Winkle rose to say with great elegance, "We don't wish any boys, they only joke and bounce about.
The next moment, relieved in a great part from the downward strain at the bows, the boats gave a sudden bounce upwards, as a small ice-field will, when a dense herd of white bears are scared from it into the sea.
After various ineffectual pullings and twitchings, just as the senator is losing all patience, the carriage suddenly rights itself with a bounce,--two front wheels go down into another abyss, and senator, woman, and child, all tumble promiscuously on to the front seat,--senator's hat is jammed over his eyes and nose quite unceremoniously, and he considers himself fairly extinguished;--child cries, and Cudjoe on the outside delivers animated addresses to the horses, who are kicking, and floundering, and straining under repeated cracks of the whip.
Trade and commerce, if they were not made of india-rubber, would never manage to bounce over obstacles which legislators are continually putting in their way; and if one were to judge these men wholly by the effects of their actions and not partly by their intentions, they would deserve to be classed and punished with those mischievious persons who put obstructions on the railroads.
I would rather, in fact, for the distance down would be about the same, and it is pleasanter to slide than to bounce.
it was as bright as glory, and you'd have a little glimpse of tree- tops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you'd hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rum- bling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down stairs -- where it's long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know.
I finally saw plainly that there was really no way but one--I must simply give her the grand bounce.
Say -- if you give me much more of your sass I'll take and bounce a rock off'n your head.
She had a serpentine way of coming close at me when she pretended to be vitally interested in the friends and localities I had left, which was altogether snaky and fork-tongued; and when she made an occasional bounce upon Startop(who said very little to her), or upon Drummle (who said less), I rather envied them for being on the opposite side of the table.
She gaped, and leaned to one end of the sofa until, on the point of overbalancing' she recovered herself with a prodigious bounce.
The veins and arteries spouted up such a prodigious quantity of blood, and so high in the air, that the great JET D'EAU at Versailles was not equal to it for the time it lasted: and the head, when it fell on the scaffold floor, gave such a bounce as made me start, although I was at least half an English mile distant.
I do not need a better reply, there is but one man upon all Barsoom who can bounce about like a rubber ball.