bounce back


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bounce

 (bouns)
v. bounced, bounc·ing, bounc·es
v.intr.
1. To rebound after having struck an object or a surface.
2. To move jerkily; bump: The car bounced over the potholes.
3. To bound: children bouncing into the room.
4. To be sent back by a bank as valueless: a check that bounced.
5. Computers To be sent back by a mail server as undeliverable: That e-mail bounced because I used "com" instead of "net."
6. Baseball To hit a ground ball to an infielder: The batter bounced out to the shortstop.
v.tr.
1. To cause to strike an object or a surface and rebound: bounce a ball on the sidewalk.
2. To present or propose for comment or approval. Often used with off: bounced a few ideas off my boss.
3. Slang
a. To expel by force: bounced him from the bar.
b. To dismiss from employment. See Synonyms at dismiss.
4. To write (a check) on an overdrawn bank account.
n.
1.
a. A rebound, as of a ball from the ground.
b. A sudden bound or upward movement: The bike went over the rock with a bounce.
c. The capacity to rebound; spring: a ball with bounce.
d. A sudden increase: got a bounce in the polls.
2. Cheerfulness or liveliness: "He had managed to recover much of his bounce and spirit" (Paul Auster).
3. Slang Expulsion; dismissal: was given the bounce from the job.
4. Chiefly British Loud, arrogant speech; bluster.
Phrasal Verb:
bounce back
To recover quickly, as from a setback: The patient bounced back to good health.

[Probably from Middle English bounsen, to beat.]

bounce back

vb
(intr, adverb) to recover one's health, good spirits, confidence, etc, easily after a setback
n
a recovery following a setback
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bounce back - improve in health; "He got well fast"
ameliorate, improve, meliorate, better - get better; "The weather improved toward evening"
Translations

w>bounce back

vt sep ballzurückprallen lassen
viabprallen, zurückprallen; (fig inf: person) → sich nicht unterkriegen lassen (inf); (to boyfriend) → zurückkommen
References in periodicals archive ?
But to bounce back with a performance this emphatic was probably not something we thought was on the cards.
PIPE: Saw his runner bounce back to form with a vengeance
Clinton's bounce back in the past few days was reminiscent of when his popularity shot up after his State of the Union message in late January, which he delivered shortly after allegations about his relationship with Lewinsky, a former White House intern, were disclosed.
The Greenbacks chief watched his men suffer a 4-0 loss at Solihull Borough on Saturday, but sees the Redditch encounter as the perfect opportunity to bounce back to winning ways.
And after last Saturday's undeserved opening day defeat to Coventry City, the Blues will be looking to bounce back.
Bassist Phil Blake is also an admirer of the Firs Park team's ability to bounce back from adversity and insists the song can lift others in a similar plight.
We need to bounce back from last week but, despite the defeat, there were some good aspects to our overall performance," added Kenny.
We are usually at our best when we have our backs to the wall, and tomorrow night and Saturday we play Sutton in the cup and league which will be a massive test and one we can hopefully succeed in and bounce back from and help get over the despair of Saturday.
The scoop: Cal Lutheran is hoping to bounce back from a disappointing 20-14 double-overtime loss to Pacific Lutheran last week.
But we have got an opportunity to bounce back in the Carling Cup.
But he reckons the Magpies will bounce back against Manchester United on Wednesday - if they take a leaf out of the Old Trafford book.
City closed the gap at the top to just one point, but Ternent is confident the Clarets will bounce back.