boundable

boundable

(ˈbaʊndəbəl)
adj
able to be bound or limited
References in periodicals archive ?
A holistic approach that emphasizes context and interrelationships and re-conceptualizes disease beyond something that is discrete and boundable are critical to appropriately support women living with HIV and HSV-2.
Attempting to capture this infinity of phenomena "exactly," overwhelmed by the "swarming multitude" (285) of alternate possibilities "not traceable in space or boundable by time .
In contrast to the current emphasis on cultural fluidity, mobility, and permeability, the anthropology of the 1950s considered cultures as geographically boundable, isolable entities.
The student as a subject implies that a child is boundable, measurable, and scientifically determined.
Together with other vehicles, prestige and monumentalist architectural projects act as visible and tangible markers contributing to the invention and management of a boundable nationalist culture in the context of a global stage.