bounded


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Related to bounded: Bounded function, Bounded sequence, Bounded set

bound 1

 (bound)
intr.v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
1. To leap forward or upward; jump; spring: The dog bounded over the gate.
2. To move forward by leaps or springs: The deer bounded into the woods.
3. To spring back from a surface; rebound: The basketball bounded off the backboard.
n.
1. A leap; a jump: The deer was away in a single bound.
2. A springing back from a surface after hitting it; a bounce: caught the ball on the bound.

[French bondir, to bounce, from Old French, to resound, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bombitīre, from Latin bombitāre, to hum, from bombus, a humming sound, from Greek bombos.]

bound 2

 (bound)
n.
1. often bounds A boundary; a limit: Our joy knew no bounds. Your remarks exceed the bounds of reason.
2. bounds The territory on, within, or near limiting lines: the bounds of the kingdom.
v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
v.tr.
1. To set a limit to; confine: a high wall that bounded the prison yard; lives that were bounded by poverty.
2. To constitute the boundary or limit of: a city park that was bounded by busy streets.
3. To identify the boundaries of; demarcate.
v.intr.
To border on another place, state, or country.
Idioms:
in/within bounds Sports
Within the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore in play or legal.
out of bounds
1. Sports Outside the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore not in play or legal.
2. Outside the boundary of where one is allowed to be; in a forbidden or unauthorized place: The research lab is out of bounds for first-year students.
3. In violation of acceptable rules or standards, as of decency: felt the guest's behavior was out of bounds.

[Middle English, from Old French bodne, bonde and Anglo-Norman bunde, both from Medieval Latin bodina, of Celtic origin.]

bound 3

 (bound)
v.
Past tense and past participle of bind.
adj.
1. Confined by bonds; tied: bound hostages.
2. Being under legal or moral obligation: bound by my promise.
3. Equipped with a cover or binding: bound volumes.
4. Predetermined; certain: We're bound to be late.
5. Determined; resolved: Many public policy students are bound to be politicians one day.
6. Linguistics Being a form, especially a morpheme, that cannot stand as an independent word, such as a prefix or suffix.
7. Constipated.

bound 4

 (bound)
adj.
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction: commuters bound for home; a south-bound train.

[Alteration of Middle English boun, ready, from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa, to get ready; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

bounded

(ˈbaʊndɪd)
adj
1. (Mathematics) (of a set) having a bound, esp where a measure is defined in terms of which all the elements of the set, or the differences between all pairs of members, are less than some value, or else all its members lie within some other well-defined set
2. (Mathematics) (of an operator, function, etc) having a bounded set of values
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bounded - having the limits or boundaries established; "a delimited frontier through the disputed region"
finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
References in classic literature ?
And Jo shook the blue army sock till the needles rattled like castanets, and her ball bounded across the room.
A little later the trim and speedy car drew up in front of the Nestor home, and Tom bounded up on the front porch, his heart not altogether as light as his feet.
Behind them, the curvature of the banks soon bounded the view by the same dark and wooded outline; but in front, and apparently at no great distance, the water seemed piled against the heavens, whence it tumbled into caverns, out of which issued those sullen sounds that had loaded the evening atmosphere.
Christie gave a little cry--her heart had bounded with him; it seemed as if his plunge had splashed the water in her eyes.
I bounded straight out of the door again, reached that of the house, got, in an instant, upon the drive, and, passing along the terrace as fast as I could rush, turned a corner and came full in sight.
Before they could gather the meaning of his breathless ejaculations he had bounded away, and they saw him enter a shop, over which was a sign: "J.
I was looking for Harry, please, sir;" and the boy bounded toward her, showing his spoils, which he had gathered in the skirt of his robe.
The length of this glacier exceeded EIGHTY MILES, and it drained a basin twenty-five to thirty-five miles across, bounded by the highest mountains in the Alps.
I clipped along, and all of a sudden I bounded right on to the ashes of a camp fire that was still smoking.
Tom flung off his jacket and trousers, turned a suspender into a belt, raked away some brush behind the rotten log, dis- closing a rude bow and arrow, a lath sword and a tin trumpet, and in a moment had seized these things and bounded away, barelegged, with fluttering shirt.
Whenever the wheels sank farther than usual into a rut, or jolted suddenly over a stone, she bounded involuntarily into the air, came down again, pushed back her funny little straw hat, and picked up or settled more firmly a small pink sun shade, which seemed to be her chief responsibility, --unless we except a bead purse, into which she looked whenever the condition of the roads would permit, finding great apparent satisfaction in that its precious contents neither disappeared nor grew less.
It was not thrown away on her, she bounded higher than ever, flew farther down the middle, and was in a continual course of smiles.