bounded


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bound 1

 (bound)
intr.v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
1. To leap forward or upward; jump; spring: The dog bounded over the gate.
2. To move forward by leaps or springs: The deer bounded into the woods.
3. To spring back from a surface; rebound: The basketball bounded off the backboard.
n.
1. A leap; a jump: The deer was away in a single bound.
2. A springing back from a surface after hitting it; a bounce: caught the ball on the bound.

[French bondir, to bounce, from Old French, to resound, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bombitīre, from Latin bombitāre, to hum, from bombus, a humming sound, from Greek bombos.]

bound 2

 (bound)
n.
1. often bounds A boundary; a limit: Our joy knew no bounds. Your remarks exceed the bounds of reason.
2. bounds The territory on, within, or near limiting lines: the bounds of the kingdom.
v. bound·ed, bound·ing, bounds
v.tr.
1. To set a limit to; confine: a high wall that bounded the prison yard; lives that were bounded by poverty.
2. To constitute the boundary or limit of: a city park that was bounded by busy streets.
3. To identify the boundaries of; demarcate.
v.intr.
To border on another place, state, or country.
Idioms:
in/within bounds Sports
Within the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore in play or legal.
out of bounds
1. Sports Outside the boundary of a playing field or court and therefore not in play or legal.
2. Outside the boundary of where one is allowed to be; in a forbidden or unauthorized place: The research lab is out of bounds for first-year students.
3. In violation of acceptable rules or standards, as of decency: felt the guest's behavior was out of bounds.

[Middle English, from Old French bodne, bonde and Anglo-Norman bunde, both from Medieval Latin bodina, of Celtic origin.]

bound 3

 (bound)
v.
Past tense and past participle of bind.
adj.
1. Confined by bonds; tied: bound hostages.
2. Being under legal or moral obligation: bound by my promise.
3. Equipped with a cover or binding: bound volumes.
4. Predetermined; certain: We're bound to be late.
5. Determined; resolved: Many public policy students are bound to be politicians one day.
6. Linguistics Being a form, especially a morpheme, that cannot stand as an independent word, such as a prefix or suffix.
7. Constipated.

bound 4

 (bound)
adj.
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction: commuters bound for home; a south-bound train.

[Alteration of Middle English boun, ready, from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa, to get ready; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

bounded

(ˈbaʊndɪd)
adj
1. (Mathematics) (of a set) having a bound, esp where a measure is defined in terms of which all the elements of the set, or the differences between all pairs of members, are less than some value, or else all its members lie within some other well-defined set
2. (Mathematics) (of an operator, function, etc) having a bounded set of values
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bounded - having the limits or boundaries established; "a delimited frontier through the disputed region"
finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
References in classic literature ?
Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
The wolf crouched, gnashed her teeth, and again rose and bounded forward, followed at the distance of a couple of feet by all the borzois, who did not get any closer to her.
The modest converse of the shepherd girls of these hamlets and the care of my goats are my recreations; my desires are bounded by these mountains, and if they ever wander hence it is to contemplate the beauty of the heavens, steps by which the soul travels to its primeval abode.
Nearer they grew and nearer; now there was a sound of feet, and a wolf, great and grey, bounded towards them, and after him many another.
He spoke and bounded forward, and with him went Umslopogaas, and after him streamed the ghost-wolves.
Then the chase wheeled, the bull leaped and bounded up the mountain side, and on one flank lay Greysnout and Deathgrip and on the other lay Blood and Blackfang, while behind came the Wolf-Brethren, and after them the wolves with lolling tongues.
Presently from a great distance and faintly there came an answering scream, and a half-hour later the lithe form of Sheeta bounded into view where the others of the pack were clambering gingerly into the canoe.
Like a deer he bounded along the narrow trail until, filled with the excitement of his news, he burst into a native village several miles above the point at which Tarzan and his pack had stopped to hunt.
At this moment, a male ostrich sprang from its nest right beneath the horse's nose: the young colt bounded on one side like a stag; but as for the man, all that could be said was, that he started and took fright with his horse.
SIALKOT -- Additional district and sessions judge Syed Ali Imran on Tuesday ordered the authorities concerned to hand over 13 children to their parents and three children to Child Protection Bureau (CPB) while hearing a case of bounded child labour.
The Scope of Bounded and Unbounded Institutional Structures
Those who supported Moon Bound at odds-on had very few anxious moments as the 10-11 favourite bounded round the home turn in front and swept across the line three and a half lengths to the good.