bounty

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boun·ty

 (boun′tē)
n. pl. boun·ties
1. Liberality in giving.
2. Something given liberally.
3. A reward, inducement, or payment, especially one given by a government for acts deemed beneficial to the state, such as killing predatory animals, growing certain crops, starting certain industries, or enlisting for military service.

[Middle English bounte, from Old French bonte, from Latin bonitās, goodness, from bonus, good; see deu- in Indo-European roots.]

Bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n
(Nautical Terms) a British naval ship commanded by Captain William Bligh, which was on a scientific voyage in 1789 between Tahiti and the West Indies when her crew mutinied

Bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n
(Nautical Terms) a British naval ship commanded by Captain William Bligh, which was on a scientific voyage in 1789 between Tahiti and the West Indies when her crew mutinied

boun•ty

(ˈbaʊn ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a premium or reward, esp. one offered by a government.
2. a generous gift.
3. generosity.
[1200–50; Middle English b(o)unte < Anglo-French, Old French bonte, Old French bontet < Latin bonitātem]
boun′ty•less, adj.
syn: See bonus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the militarybounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the military
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
reward - payment made in return for a service rendered
2.bounty - the property of copious abundancebounty - the property of copious abundance  
abundance, copiousness, teemingness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply; "an age of abundance"
3.bounty - generosity evidenced by a willingness to give freely
generosity, generousness - the trait of being willing to give your money or time
4.Bounty - a ship of the British navy; in 1789 part of the crew mutinied against their commander William Bligh and set him afloat in an open boat

bounty

noun (Literary)
1. generosity, charity, assistance, kindness, philanthropy, benevolence, beneficence, liberality, almsgiving, open-handedness, largesse or largess The aid organization would not allow such bounty.
2. abundance, plenty, exuberance, profusion, affluence, plenitude, copiousness, plenteousness autumn's bounty of fruits, seeds and berries
3. reward, present, grant, prize, payment, gift, compensation, bonus, premium, donation, recompense, gratuity, meed (archaic), largesse or largess They paid bounties for people to give up their weapons.

bounty

noun
A sum of money offered for a special service, such as the apprehension of a criminal:
Translations
كَرَم، جودهِبَةٌ، عَطِيَّةٌ
darštědrost
generøs gaveoverflod
palkkio
örlætivegleg gjöf
dóvanos
balvadāsnumsdevībavelte
cömertçe verilen hediyecömertlikeli açıklıkihsan

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ]
A. N
1. (= generosity) → generosidad f, munificencia f
2. (= reward) → recompensa f (Mil) → premio m de enganche
B. CPD bounty hunter Ncazarrecompensas mf inv

bounty

[ˈbaʊnti] n (= generosity) [person, nature] → générosité f; [season] → abondance f
(= reward) → prime fbounty hunter nchasseur m de primes

bounty

n
(= generosity)Freigebigkeit f; (of nature)reiche Fülle (geh)
(= gift)großzügige or reiche Gabe (geh)
(= reward money)Kopfgeld nt

bounty

:
bounty-fed
adj (Econ) → subventioniert
bounty hunter
nKopfgeldjäger(in) m(f)

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ] n (generosity) → liberalità, munificenza; (reward) → taglia

bounty

(ˈbaunti) noun
1. generosity in giving.
2. (plural ˈbounties) something given out of generosity.
References in classic literature ?
I now live in peace and safety, enjoying the sweets of liberty, and the bounties of Providence, with my once fellow-sufferers, in this delightful country, which I have seen purchased with a vast expence of blood and treasure, delighting in the prospect of its being, in a short time, one of the most opulent and powerful states on the continent of North- America; which, with the love and gratitude of my country-men, I esteem a sufficient reward for all my toil and dangers.
Why did Britain between the years and pay to her whalemen in bounties upwards of 1,000,000 pounds?
ADAM, earths hallowd mould, Of God inspir'd, small store will serve, where store, All seasons, ripe for use hangs on the stalk; Save what by frugal storing firmness gains To nourish, and superfluous moist consumes: But I will haste and from each bough and break, Each Plant & juciest Gourd will pluck such choice To entertain our Angel guest, as hee Beholding shall confess that here on Earth God hath dispenst his bounties as in Heav'n.
Shall the liberal bounties of Providence to the race of man be monopolized by one of ten thousand for whom they were created?
In order to furnish the quotas required of them, they outbid each other till bounties grew to an enormous and insupportable size.
With France and with Britain we are rivals in the fisheries, and can supply their markets cheaper than they can themselves, notwithstanding any efforts to prevent it by bounties on their own or duties on foreign fish.
In a more remote stage, the imports may consist in a considerable part of raw materials, which will be wrought into articles for exportation, and will, therefore, require rather the encouragement of bounties, than to be loaded with discouraging duties.
When they met in conclave, it was never to keep up the old English mirth, but to hear sermons three hours long, or to proclaim bounties on the heads of wolves and the scalps of Indians.
There was talk of all countries putting bounties on children to increase the birth rate, but it was laughed to scorn by the arithmeticians, who pointed out that China was too far in the lead in that direction.