bourgeoisification


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Related to bourgeoisification: embourgeoisement

bourg·eoi·si·fi·ca·tion

 (bo͝or-zhwä′zə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
The act or process of adopting or the condition of having adopted the characteristics attributed to the bourgeoisie.

bour·geoi′si·fy′ (-zə-fī′) v.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keyed to the bourgeoisification of the peasantry noted by several analysts is a novel rural politics that, unlike older modes of everyday resistance, seeks to establish productive connections to the sources of political power.
A case in point is the damaging masculinist bourgeoisification of windsurfing (Potts and Thomas).
While cultural critics worried about the Westernization and bourgeoisification of these members of the vanguard proletariat, for the women themselves fashion and dancing signaled the modernity and up-to-dateness of the revolutionary urban capital (Gurusch 177, 183, 185).
Both authors discuss changing modes of viewing and listening--as William Weber and James Johnson have done for 19th-century London, Vienna, and Paris--and suggest a distinctly Russian version of the bourgeoisification of culture.
By privileging certain values or lifestyles over others--such as marriage over cohabitation or, even more questionably, over employment--Rodolphe equates redemption with bourgeoisification as he helps these women make over their lives.
Through this interplay of external and internal factors in the socialization of the children of Mennonite peasant merchants, several remarkably well-developed middle-class habits emerged that cannot be understood as simple adaptations of the civic virtues and lifestyles around them--frequently noted in the literature as "the bourgeoisification of the peasants" [Verburgerlichung der Bauern].
5'ers are experiencing rapid bourgeoisification and integration into the consumer society.
Like many other radical critics, Sorel perceived the emptiness of the liberal promise of freedom once it becomes bound up with regimentation and bourgeoisification of everyday life.
That such distance was growing within the Black community is well-stated by Wilmore: "the period between 1890 and the Second World War was one of luxuriant growth and proliferation of many forms of black religion in the United States and Africa that challenged the bourgeoisification of the mainline black denominations.
But after 1820 the accumulation of personal wealth and the bourgeoisification of society led to increasingly private patronage and a "verburglichte" taste, an appreciation for the depiction and celebration of contemporary domestic life, notably as it had been revived and translated by Wilkie.
They feared that consumer society and bourgeoisification would dissolve these values, and La Storia spoke to this fear.