bowel


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Related to bowel: Bowel obstruction, bowel infection, Bowel movements, Bowel cancer

bow·el

 (bou′əl, boul)
n.
1.
a. often bowels The intestine.
b. A part or division of the intestine: the large bowel.
2. bowels The interior of something: in the bowels of the ship.
3. bowels Archaic The seat of pity or the gentler emotions.

[Middle English, from Old French boel, from Latin botellus, small intestine, diminutive of botulus, sausage.]

bowel

(ˈbaʊəl)
n
1. (Anatomy) an intestine, esp the large intestine in man
2. (Anatomy) (plural) innards; entrails
3. (plural) the deep or innermost part (esp in the phrase the bowels of the earth)
4. (plural) archaic the emotions, esp of pity or sympathy
[C13: from Old French bouel, from Latin botellus a little sausage, from botulus sausage]

bow•el

(ˈbaʊ əl, baʊl)

n., v. -eled, -el•ing (esp. Brit.) -elled, -el•ling. n.
1. Usu., bowels. the intestine.
2. bowels,
a. the inward or interior parts: the bowels of the earth.
b. Archaic. feelings of pity or compassion.
v.t.
3. to disembowel.
[1250–1300; Middle English b(o)uel < Old French < Latin botellus little sausage]
bow′el•less, adj.

bow·el

(bou′əl)
The intestine, especially of a human. Often used in the plural as bowels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bowel - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anusbowel - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus
internal organ, viscus - a main organ that is situated inside the body
hindgut - the caudal part of the alimentary canal in vertebrate embryos
small intestine - the longest part of the alimentary canal; where digestion is completed
large intestine - beginning with the cecum and ending with the rectum; includes the cecum and the colon and the rectum; extracts moisture from food residues which are later excreted as feces
abdomen, belly, stomach, venter - the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
Translations
أمْعاء، مَصارين، أحْشاءجَوْف، باطِن
nitrostřevoútrobyvnitřnosti
indretarm
() entrañasintestino
iîuròarmur, görn
gelmėstuštinimasisžarnos
dzīlesiekšasiekšienezarna
črevo
bağırsakiç kısmı

bowel

[ˈbaʊəl]
A. N
1.intestino m
2. bowels (Anat) → intestinos mpl, vientre msing (fig) → entrañas fpl
the bowels of the earth/shiplas entrañas de la tierra/del barco
the bowels of compassion (liter) → la compasión
B. CPD bowel movement Nevacuación f (del vientre)

bowel

[ˈbaʊəl] modif [cancer] → de l'intestin
bowel movement → selles fplbowel obstruction nocclusion f intestinale
The boy was suffering from a bowel obstruction and he died → Le garçon souffrait d'occlusion intestinale et en est mort.

bowel

n usu pl
(Anat, of person) → Eingeweide nt usu pl, → Gedärm nt usu pl; (of animal also)Innereien pl; a bowel movementStuhl(gang) m; to move one’s bowelsStuhl(gang) haben; to control one’s bowelsseine Darmentleerung kontrollieren; he had something wrong with his bowelsmit seiner Verdauung stimmte etwas nicht
(fig) the bowels of the earth/ship etcdas Erdinnere/Schiffsinnere etc, das Innere der Erde/der Schiffsbauch etc

bowel

[ˈbaʊəl] n (gen pl) → intestino, intestini mpl
cancer of the bowel → cancro all'intestino
bowels of the earth → viscere fpl della terra

bowel

(ˈbauəl) noun
1. (usually in plural) the part of the digestive system below the stomach; the intestines. The surgeon removed part of her bowel.
2. (in plural) the inside of something, especially when deep. the bowels of the earth.
ˈbowel movement noun
an act of emptying the bowels.

bow·el

n. intestino;
___ incontinenceincontinencia en la evacuación;
___ movementevacuación, deposición;
___ obstructionobstrucción intestinal.

bowel

n intestino, tripa (fam, frec. pl); large — colon m, intestino grueso; small — intestino delgado
References in classic literature ?
Who would think, then, that such fine ladies and gentlemen should regale themselves with an essence found in the inglorious bowels of a sick whale
There it was, as sure a fact and as substantial a fact as any serene volcano, standing innocent with its smokeless summit in the blue sky and giving no sign of the rising hell in its bowels.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
For this atrocity the Abbot menaced him with excommunication, and made out a dreadful list of complaints in the bowels and stomach, suffered by himself and his monks, in consequence of the tyrannical and unjust imprisonment they had sustained.
For which the astronomers (who have written large systems concerning the stone) assign the following reason: that the magnetic virtue does not extend beyond the distance of four miles, and that the mineral, which acts upon the stone in the bowels of the earth, and in the sea about six leagues distant from the shore, is not diffused through the whole globe, but terminated with the limits of the king's dominions; and it was easy, from the great advantage of such a superior situation, for a prince to bring under his obedience whatever country lay within the attraction of that magnet.
Then all was peace, all friendship, all concord; as yet the dull share of the crooked plough had not dared to rend and pierce the tender bowels of our first mother that without compulsion yielded from every portion of her broad fertile bosom all that could satisfy, sustain, and delight the children that then possessed her.
This was the good old fashion of fireplaces when there was wood enough in the forests to keep people warm without their digging into the bowels of the earth for coal.
To this the porter replied, as well as he could for trepidation, that he had once before heard of this sea-beast; that it was a cruel demon, with bowels of sulphur and blood of fire, created by evil genii as the means of inflicting misery upon mankind; that the things upon its back were vermin, such as sometimes infest cats and dogs, only a little larger and more savage; and that these vermin had their uses, however evil -- for, through the torture they caused the beast by their nibbling and stingings, it was goaded into that degree of wrath which was requisite to make it roar and commit ill, and so fulfil the vengeful and malicious designs of the wicked genii.
The gloom which surrounded that horrible charnel pit, which seemed to go down to the very bowels of the earth, conveyed from far down the sights and sounds of the nethermost hell.
Lower and lower she sank until as darkness enveloped us her lights were thrown on and in the dim halo of her own radiance the monster battleship dropped on and on down into what seemed to me must be the very bowels of Barsoom.
As we advanced up the river which winds beneath the Golden Cliffs out of the bowels of the Mountains of Otz to mingle its dark waters with the grim and mysterious Iss the faint glow which had appeared before us grew gradually into an all-enveloping radiance.
We were buried in the bowels of a huge snow-clad peak.