bower


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Related to bower: grunt, gulp, yeoman, NPM

bow·er 1

 (bou′ər)
n.
1. A shaded, leafy recess; an arbor.
2. A woman's private chamber in a medieval castle; a boudoir.
3. A rustic cottage; a country retreat.
tr.v. bow·ered, bow·er·ing, bow·ers
To enclose in or as if in a bower; embower.

[Middle English bour, a dwelling, from Old English būr; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

bow′er·y adj.

bow·er 2

 (bou′ər)
n. Nautical
An anchor carried at the bow.

bower

(ˈbaʊə)
n
1. a shady leafy shelter or recess, as in a wood or garden; arbour
2. literary a lady's bedroom or apartments, esp in a medieval castle; boudoir
3. literary a country cottage, esp one regarded as charming or picturesque
[Old English būr dwelling; related to Old Norse būr pantry, Old High German būr dwelling]
ˈbowery adj

bower

(ˈbaʊə)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a vessel's bow anchor
[C18: from bow3 + -er1]

bower

(ˈbaʊə)
n
(Card Games) a jack in euchre and similar card games
[C19: from German Bauer peasant, jack (in cards)]

bow•er1

(ˈbaʊ ər)
n.
1. a leafy shelter or recess; arbor.
2. a rustic dwelling; cottage.
3. a lady's boudoir in a medieval castle.
v.t.
4. to enclose in or as if in a bower.
[before 900; Middle English bour, Old English būr chamber]

bow•er2

(ˈbaʊ ər)

n.
an anchor carried at a ship's bow.
[1645–55]

bow•er3

(ˈbaʊ ər)

n.
one that bows or bends.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bower - a framework that supports climbing plantsbower - a framework that supports climbing plants; "the arbor provided a shady resting place in the park"
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
grape arbor, grape arbour - an arbor where grapes are grown
Verb1.bower - enclose in a bower
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"

bower

noun arbour, grotto, alcove, summerhouse, shady recess, leafy shelter a private bower of ivy and honeysuckle
Translations

bower

[ˈbaʊəʳ] Nemparrado m, enramada f

bower

[ˈbaʊər] n (literary) (in garden)tonnelle f

bower

nLaube f
References in classic literature ?
Boffin's Bower is the name Mrs Boffin christened it when we come into it as a property.
But, when night came, and with her veiled eyes beheld him stumping towards Boffin's Bower, he was elated too.
It was growing dark now, and so they ate again of the fruit which was both food and drink for them; then Tarzan rose, and leading Jane to the little bower he had erected, motioned her to go within.
He removed his hunting knife from its sheath and handed it to her hilt first, again motioning her into the bower.
However, I was so enamoured of this place, that I spent much of my time there for the whole of the remaining part of the month of July; and though upon second thoughts, I resolved not to remove, yet I built me a little kind of a bower, and surrounded it at a distance with a strong fence, being a double hedge, as high as I could reach, well staked and filled between with brushwood; and here I lay very secure, sometimes two or three nights together; always going over it with a ladder; so that I fancied now I had my country house and my sea- coast house; and this work took me up to the beginning of August.
About the beginning of August, as I said, I had finished my bower, and began to enjoy myself.
There, in a secluded bower, the two lovers whispered their hopes and plans, unmindful of the royal charge playing neglected among the flowers and shrubbery of the garden.
So some make ready the bower, the tables and the seats, while Maid Marian, Little John and others set out to hunt.
Mr and Mrs Quilp resided on Tower Hill; and in her bower on Tower Hill.
When completed, it was a sweet rural bower, roofed overhead with an arch of living boughs.
I was elated with having handled heavy anchors, cables, boats without the slightest hitch; pleased with having laid out scientifically bower, stream, and kedge exactly where I believed they would do most good.
No rays from the holy heaven come down On the long night-time of that town; But light from out the lurid sea Streams up the turrets silently - Gleams up the pinnacles far and free - Up domes - up spires - up kingly halls - Up fanes - up Babylon-like walls - Up shadowy long-forgotten bowers Of scultured ivy and stone flowers - Up many and many a marvellous shrine Whose wreathed friezes intertwine The viol, the violet, and the vine.