bowline

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bowline

bow·line

 (bō′lĭn, -līn′)
n.
1. Nautical A rope attached to the weather leech of a square sail to hold the leech forward when sailing close-hauled.
2. A knot forming a loop that does not slip but that can be untied easily.

[Middle English bouline, probably from Middle Danish bovline or Middle Low German bōlīne, both from Middle Low German bōch līne : bōch, bow; see bheug- in Indo-European roots + līne, line (from Latin līnea; see line1).]

bowline

(ˈbəʊlɪn)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a line for controlling the weather leech of a square sail when a vessel is close-hauled
2. (Nautical Terms) on a bowline beating close to the wind
3. (Knots) a knot used for securing a loop that will not slip at the end of a piece of rope
[C14: probably from Middle Low German bōlīne, equivalent to bow3 + line1]

bow•line

(ˈboʊ lɪn, -ˌlaɪn)

n.
1. Also called bow′line knot`. a knot used to make a nonslipping loop on the end of a rope.
2. a rope fastened to the leech of a square sail to keep the sail as flat as possible when sailing close-hauled.
[1275–1325; Middle English bouline]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bowline - a loop knot that neither slips nor jamsbowline - a loop knot that neither slips nor jams
loop knot - any of various knots used to make a fixed loop in a rope
Translations

bowline

[ˈbəʊlɪn] Nbolina f

bowline

nPalstek m; (= rope)Bulin(e) f

bowline

[ˈbəʊlɪn] n (Naut) (also bowline knot) → gassa d'amante
References in classic literature ?
Meantime, the crew driven from the forward part of the ship by the perilous seas that burstingly broke over its bows, stood in a line along the bulwarks in the waist; and the better to guard against the leaping waves, each man had slipped himself into a sort of bowline secured to the rail, in which he swung as in a loosened belt.
Amid renewed growling and another futile attempt to free himself, Numa was finally forced to submit to the further indignity of having a rope secured about his neck; but this time it was no noose that might tighten and strangle him; but a bowline knot, which does not tighten or slip under strain.
But Jerry was to know Harley Kennan, and quickly, for it was Harley Kennan, a bowline around his body under his arm-pits, lowered by a couple of seamen down the generous freeboard of the Ariel, who gathered in by the nape of the neck the smooth-coated Irish terrier that, treading water perpendicularly, had no eyes for him so eagerly did he gaze at the line of faces along the rail in quest of the one face.
From the boat-deck, with a bowline under Kwaque's arms and a turn of the rope around a pin, Dag Daughtry had lowered his leprous servitor into the waiting launch.