bowsie

bowsie

(ˈbaʊziː) or

bowsey

n
1. a low-class mean or obstreperous person
2. a drunkard
[of unknown origin]
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been suggested this is a portrayal of Bowsie, a vagrant who appears in several of the painter's brother WB Yeats' novels.
Poor Colin often gets made fun of because of his past performances as a bowsie coupled with his good looks overshadowing his acting abilities.
In A Quip for an Upstart Courtier (London, 1592), Robert Greene also uses bawdy to connote the excremental, in the description of a drunken servingman with "bawdy and bowsie excrements that dropt from his filthy leaking mouth" (sig.
This year's winners were: June Bowsie and Helen Pendlebury, Linda Hearne and Lynn Edwards, Ann and Tim Healey, Carolyn and Madan Jassi, Marion and Christina Jones, James and Ann Matthews, Robert and Maureen Lynch, Linda Trueman and Barbara Higgins, Henry and Pauline Winstanley and Robert Woodward and Elizabeth Hamill.
From the Tea Time Gang at the Dorman's; George and Freda, Billy and Sheila, Terry and Maureen, John and Irene, Alan and Pam, Mick, Terry and Elaine, Mandy, Bowsie R.
The 10 winners (plus a guest each) of this year's competition are: June Bowsie, of Netherton; Ann Healey, of Bootle; Marion Jones, of Walton; Mr R Lynch, of Fazakerley; Carolyn Jassi, of Ormskirk; Robert Woodward, of Grassendale; Linda Hearne, of Halewood; James Matthews, of Bebington; Linda Trueman, of Waterloo; and Henry Winstanley, of Kirkby.
He told Midlands Radio: "I know I was acting a bit like a bowsie.
But the judge said he didn't care about the States and Nevin hadn't when he was "acting the bowsie on the streets of Mullingar".
When Jason got to the hotel he said he didn't have it so we presumed Bowsie would be bringing it.
The controversial bishop put the curse on Gay last March after the veteran broadcaster let outrageous rock band The Hairy Bowsies mock the Pope.