boycott


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boy·cott

 (boi′kŏt′)
tr.v. boy·cott·ed, boy·cott·ing, boy·cotts
To abstain from or act together in abstaining from using, buying, dealing with, or participating in as an expression of protest or disfavor or as a means of coercion: boycott a business; boycott merchants; boycott buses; boycott an election.
n.
The act or an instance of boycotting.

[After Charles C. Boycott, (1832-1897), English land agent in Ireland.]

boy′cott′er n.
Word History: An Englishman and former British soldier, Charles C. Boycott was the estate agent of the Earl of Erne in County Mayo, Ireland. The earl was one of the absentee landowners who as a group held most of the land in Ireland. Boycott was chosen in the fall of 1880 to be the test case for a new policy advocated by Charles Parnell, an Irish politician who wanted land reform. Any landlord who would not charge lower rents or any tenant who took over the farm of an evicted tenant would be given the complete cold shoulder by Parnell's supporters. Boycott refused to charge lower rents and ejected his tenants. At this point members of Parnell's Irish Land League stepped in, and Boycott and his family found themselves isolated—without servants, farmhands, service in stores, or mail delivery. Boycott's name was quickly adopted as the term for this treatment, not just in English but in other languages such as French, Dutch, German, and Russian.

boycott

(ˈbɔɪkɒt)
vb
(tr) to refuse to have dealings with (a person, organization, etc) or refuse to buy (a product) as a protest or means of coercion: to boycott foreign produce.
n
an instance or the use of boycotting
[C19: after Captain C. C. Boycott (1832–97), Irish land agent for the Earl of Erne, County Mayo, Ireland, who was a victim of such practices for refusing to reduce rents]

Boycott

(ˈbɔɪkɒt)
n
(Biography) Geoff(rey). born 1940, English cricketer: played for Yorkshire (1962–86); played in 108 test matches (1964–82); first England batsman to score 8,000 test runs

boy•cott

(ˈbɔɪ kɒt)
v.t.
1. to join together in abstaining from, or preventing dealings with, as a means of protest or coercion: to boycott a store.
2. to abstain from buying or using: to boycott imported goods.
n.
3. the practice of boycotting.
4. an instance of boycotting.
[after Charles C. Boycott (1832–97), against whom nonviolent coercive tactics were used in 1880]
boy′cott•er, n.

boycott

, embargo - A boycott is an organized popular protest, named for Captain Charles C. Boycott (1832-97), a land agent in Ireland to whom this was done in 1880; an embargo is usually imposed by a government.
See also related terms for imposed.

boycott


Past participle: boycotted
Gerund: boycotting

Imperative
boycott
boycott
Present
I boycott
you boycott
he/she/it boycotts
we boycott
you boycott
they boycott
Preterite
I boycotted
you boycotted
he/she/it boycotted
we boycotted
you boycotted
they boycotted
Present Continuous
I am boycotting
you are boycotting
he/she/it is boycotting
we are boycotting
you are boycotting
they are boycotting
Present Perfect
I have boycotted
you have boycotted
he/she/it has boycotted
we have boycotted
you have boycotted
they have boycotted
Past Continuous
I was boycotting
you were boycotting
he/she/it was boycotting
we were boycotting
you were boycotting
they were boycotting
Past Perfect
I had boycotted
you had boycotted
he/she/it had boycotted
we had boycotted
you had boycotted
they had boycotted
Future
I will boycott
you will boycott
he/she/it will boycott
we will boycott
you will boycott
they will boycott
Future Perfect
I will have boycotted
you will have boycotted
he/she/it will have boycotted
we will have boycotted
you will have boycotted
they will have boycotted
Future Continuous
I will be boycotting
you will be boycotting
he/she/it will be boycotting
we will be boycotting
you will be boycotting
they will be boycotting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been boycotting
you have been boycotting
he/she/it has been boycotting
we have been boycotting
you have been boycotting
they have been boycotting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been boycotting
you will have been boycotting
he/she/it will have been boycotting
we will have been boycotting
you will have been boycotting
they will have been boycotting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been boycotting
you had been boycotting
he/she/it had been boycotting
we had been boycotting
you had been boycotting
they had been boycotting
Conditional
I would boycott
you would boycott
he/she/it would boycott
we would boycott
you would boycott
they would boycott
Past Conditional
I would have boycotted
you would have boycotted
he/she/it would have boycotted
we would have boycotted
you would have boycotted
they would have boycotted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boycott - a group's refusal to have commercial dealings with some organization in protest against its policies
protest, dissent, objection - the act of protesting; a public (often organized) manifestation of dissent
Verb1.boycott - refuse to sponsor; refuse to do business with
ostracise, ostracize - avoid speaking to or dealing with; "Ever since I spoke up, my colleagues ostracize me"
buy at, frequent, patronise, shop at, patronize, shop, sponsor - do one's shopping at; do business with; be a customer or client of
buy at, frequent, patronise, shop at, patronize, shop, sponsor - do one's shopping at; do business with; be a customer or client of

boycott

verb
1. embargo, reject, snub, refrain from, stay away from, spurn, steer clear of, blacklist, black, cold-shoulder, ostracize, refuse to take part in, turn your back on, blackball The main opposition parties are boycotting the elections.
back, support, accept, champion, welcome, promote, advocate, espouse, patronize
noun
1. embargo the lifting of the economic boycott

boycott

verb
To exclude from normal social or professional activities:
Translations
مُقاطَعَه
bojkotbojkotovat
blokadeboykotboykotte
bojkoti
boikotoidaboikotointi
bojkot
bojkottbojkottál
kaupabann, viîskiptabannsniîganga
ボイコットボイコットする
boikotasboikotuoti
boikotētboikots
bojkot
bojkotbojkotirati
bojkotta
boykot etmeboykot etmek

boycott

[ˈbɔɪkɒt]
A. Nboicot m
B. VT [+ firm, country] → boicotear

boycott

[ˈbɔɪkɒt]
nboycottage m
vtboycotter

boycott

nBoykott m; to impose a boycott on somethingeinen Boykott über etw (acc)verhängen

boycott

[ˈbɔɪkɒt]
1. nboicottaggio
2. vtboicottare

boycott

(ˈboikot) verb
to refuse to have any dealings with (a firm, country etc).
noun
a refusal to deal with a firm etc.
References in classic literature ?
Coming nearer and nearer to earth, I wondered if Colonel Boycott ever uses the word "boycott," and how strange it must have seemed to the late MacAdam to walk for miles and miles upon his own name, like a carpet spread out before him.
You have seen that you were beaten soundly at your old tactics of strike and boycott," Ernest urged.
We might go for a Bank Holiday boycott, just as the Tyne Tunnel protesters did.
And thus began the World Bank boycott, an international, grassroots campaign to exert moral, political, and financial pressure on the World Bank, which controls more investment capital and, with its sister institution the International Monetary Fund, has more policy influence in the world economy than any other institution.
In May 2002, two Australian academics--Ghassan Hage and John Docker--initiated a petition for an academic boycott of Israel.
The consumer boycotts are the first the NCC has endorsed since the apartheid era in South Africa, when the council called for a boycott of Royal Dutch/Shell products.
The second section outlines the rise of the Dexter Street Baptist church as the symbolic center of the struggle for equality, and in Raymond Arsenault's essay on the Montgomery Bus Boycott he reminds us that the situation that catapulted the movement generally "caught almost everyone by surprise.
THANKS to the invaluable public service provided by tabloid newspapers in this country, there wasn't really much that was new in Real Lives: Geoffrey Boycott.
Budweiser has joined the list of American products under threat of boycott in Europe.
right arrow] In October 1935, the American Federation of Labor and the NAACP announced their support for a boycott of the 1936 Berlin Olympics
A BOYCOTT of exams and coursework marking looks set to continue because of a deadlock between unions and university bosses.