brachiopod


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bra·chi·o·pod

 (brā′kē-ə-pŏd′, brăk′ē-)
n.
Any of numerous marine invertebrates of the phylum Brachiopoda, having a shell with two valves of unequal size enclosing an armlike lophophore used for feeding, and including many extinct species commonly found as fossils. Also called lampshell.

[From New Latin Brāchiopoda, phylum name : Latin brācchium, arm; see brachium + New Latin -poda, -pod.]

brach′i·o·pod′ adj.

brachiopod

(ˈbreɪkɪəˌpɒd; ˈbræk-)
n
(Animals) any marine invertebrate animal of the phylum Brachiopoda, having a ciliated feeding organ (lophophore) and a shell consisting of dorsal and ventral valves. Also called: lamp shell See also bryozoan
[C19: from New Latin Brachiopoda; see brachium, -pod]

bra•chi•o•pod

(ˈbreɪ ki əˌpɒd, ˈbræk i-)

n.
any superficially clamlike marine animal of the phylum Brachiopoda, having unequal dorsal and ventral shells enclosing a pair of ciliated food-gathering appendages.
[1830–40; < New Latin Brachiopoda. See brachio-, -pod]

bra·chi·o·pod

(brā′kē-ə-pŏd′)
Any of various invertebrate animals that live in the ocean and resemble clams but are sedentary. Brachiopods have paired upper and lower shells attached to a stalk, and hollow tentacles covered with cilia that sweep food particles into the mouth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brachiopod - marine animal with bivalve shell having a pair of arms bearing tentacles for capturing foodbrachiopod - marine animal with bivalve shell having a pair of arms bearing tentacles for capturing food; found worldwide
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
Brachiopoda, phylum Brachiopoda - marine invertebrates that resemble mollusks
Adj.1.brachiopod - of or belonging to the phylum Brachiopoda
References in periodicals archive ?
Criteria Taxa n Size Complex morphology Black coral 135 X X (Antipathes dendrochristos) Flat sponge 4240 X Barrel sponge 2138 X Vase sponge 1167 X Sea pen 9726 X (Subselliflorae) Basket star (Gorgonocephalus eucnemis) 733 X X White-plumed anemone 57 X (Metridium farcimen) Foliose sponge 1259 X Shelf sponge 139 X Gorgonian 27 X (Gorgonacea) Crinoid 174,231 X (Florometra serratissima) Brittle star (Ophiuridae) 207,667 Fragile sea urchin 18,363 (Allocentrotus fragilis) White sea urchin 45,092 (Lytechinus anamesus) Brachiopod 56,924 (Order Terebratulida) Density (no.
Brachiopod fragments have been found in preserved stomach contents of Janassa (Petalodontidae) and Fadenia (Caseodontidae) (Moy-Thomas and Miles, 1971).
A contribution to the life-history of the brachiopod Terebratella inconspicua Sowerby.
At this stratigraphic level a very interesting brachiopod fauna occurs that contains, in addition to typical elements of the Guadalupian Maokou Formation such as Unisteges maceus (Ching) and Orthotichia nana (Grabau), typical and common elements of the Lopingian Longtan Formation, such as Cathaysia chonetoides (Chao), Haydenella wenganensis (Huang), Leptodus nobilis (Waagen), Neochonetes substrophomenoides (Huang), Tschernyschewia sinensis Chao, and Tyloplecta yangtzeensis (Chao).
And it gleamed the color of old tusks; it held the spilth of continental seedbed, gastropod and brachiopod and seaworm and sea lily, and vertebrae of stone; and here one night of my late adolescence it made a couch for two recumbent humans, marble-limbed and languid as two figures on the lid of a sarcophagus.
Chaniella, a new lower Tremadocian (Ordovician) brachiopod from northwestern Argentina and its phylogenetic relationships within basal rhynchonelliforms.
In thin sections the AMB 1 facies display a packstone depositional fabric in which the bioclstic components are dominated by the fusulinid forams (24%), brachiopod (14%), bryozoan (10%), bivalve (1%) and echinoderm 1%.
Brachiopod fauna from the peri-Iberian platform system is well-known in the Late Pliensbachian-Toarcian interval.
The recent description of an early Cambrian unmineralized, "soft-shelled" lingulid brachiopod strongly suggests that phoronids evolved from crown-group brachiopods by the loss of a mineralized shell.
The brachiopod genus Liathyrella (Class: Rhynchonellata, Family: Terebratulidae) may be especially interesting in this respect as it has a wide latitudinal distribution with nine species occurring in the Pacific Ocean, Southern Indian Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and the Southern Ocean, including coastal Antarctica (Jackson, 1918; Peck et al.