braggart

(redirected from braggarts)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to braggarts: boasting

brag·gart

 (brăg′ərt)
n.
One given to loud, empty boasting; a bragger.
adj.
Boastful.

[French bragard, from braguer, to brag, perhaps from Middle English braggen; see brag.]

braggart

(ˈbræɡət)
n
a person who boasts loudly or exaggeratedly; bragger
adj
boastful
[C16: see brag]

brag•gart

(ˈbræg ərt)

n.
1. a person who does a lot of bragging.
adj.
2. bragging; boastful.
[1570–80]

n.
brag′gart•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.braggart - a very boastful and talkative personbraggart - a very boastful and talkative person
egoist, egotist, swellhead - a conceited and self-centered person
Adj.1.braggart - exhibiting self-importancebraggart - exhibiting self-importance; "big talk"
proud - feeling self-respect or pleasure in something by which you measure your self-worth; or being a reason for pride; "proud parents"; "proud of his accomplishments"; "a proud moment"; "proud to serve his country"; "a proud name"; "proud princes"

braggart

noun boaster, show-off (informal), bluffer, swaggerer, brag, blusterer, swashbuckler, braggadocio, hot dog (chiefly U.S.), bigmouth (slang), bragger, skite or skiter (Austral. & N.Z. informal) a swaggering jovial prankster and braggart

braggart

noun
One given to boasting:
Informal: blowhard.
Slang: blower.
adjective
Characterized by or given to boasting:
Translations
Maulheld

braggart

[ˈbrægət] Nfanfarrón/ona m/f, jactancioso/a m/f

braggart

nPrahler m, → Angeber m

braggart

[ˈbrægət] n (old) → spaccone m
References in classic literature ?
The cardinal related yesterday while playing with the king, with an air of condolence very displeasing to me, that the day before yesterday those DAMNED MUSKETEERS, those DAREDEVILS--he dwelt upon those words with an ironical tone still more displeasing to me--those BRAGGARTS, added he, glancing at me with his tiger- cat's eye, had made a riot in the Rue Ferou in a cabaret, and that a party of his Guards (I thought he was going to laugh in my face) had been forced to arrest the rioters
There you must rest; young people are such braggarts.
The Yankees talk a lot about what they do and have done," Tudor said, "and are looked down upon by the English as braggarts.
Ye are the best braggarts, and have sufficiently learned the art of making dregs boil.
He satisfied himself, however, with commanding the men-at-arms, who surrounded the lists, to keep an eye on the braggart, pointing to the yeoman.
and I hold this confirmed by having noticed that when I was by the wall of the yard witnessing the acts of thy sad tragedy, it was out of my power to mount upon it, nor could I even dismount from Rocinante, because they no doubt had me enchanted; for I swear to thee by the faith of what I am that if I had been able to climb up or dismount, I would have avenged thee in such a way that those braggart thieves would have remembered their freak for ever, even though in so doing I knew that I contravened the laws of chivalry, which, as I have often told thee, do not permit a knight to lay hands on him who is not one, save in case of urgent and great necessity in defence of his own life and person.
It will pleasure me hugely to take a braggart down a notch, an some good man will lend me a stout quarter-staff.
Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try to throw the blame upon us suitors?
Captain Bonneville, who was delighted with the game look of these cavaliers of the mountains, welcomed them heartily to his camp, and ordered a free allowance of grog to regale them, which soon put them in the most braggart spirits.
Then shall some braggart Trojan leap upon your tomb and say, 'Ever thus may Agamemnon wreak his vengeance; he brought his army in vain; he is gone home to his own land with empty ships, and has left Menelaus behind him.
Where is Menneville, that boaster, that braggart, who was to come back either dead or a conqueror?
An instance of the buoyant temperament and the professional pride of these people was furnished in the gay and braggart style in which they arrived at New York to join the enterprise.