brail

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brail

 (brāl) Nautical
n.
1. One of several small ropes attached to the leech of a sail for drawing the sail in or up.
2. A small net for drawing fish from a trap or a larger net into a boat.
tr.v. brailed, brail·ing, brails
1. To gather in (a sail) with brails.
2. To haul in (fish) with a brail.

[Middle English braile, from Old French brail, belt, from Medieval Latin brācale, from Latin brācae, breeches; see bracket.]

brail

(breɪl) nautical
n
(Nautical Terms) one of several lines fastened to the leech of a fore-and-aft sail to aid in furling it
vb
(Nautical Terms) (sometimes foll by: up) to furl (a fore-and-aft sail) using brails
[C15: from Old French braiel, from Medieval Latin brācāle belt for breeches, from Latin brāca breeches]

brail

(breɪl)
n.
1. any of several horizontal lines fastened to the edge of a fore-and-aft sail or lateen sail, for gathering in the sail.
v.t.
2. to gather or haul in (a sail) by means of brails (usu. fol. by up).
[1400–50; late Middle English, variant of brayell < Anglo-French braiel; Old French < Medieval Latin brācāle]

brail


Past participle: brailed
Gerund: brailing

Imperative
brail
brail
Present
I brail
you brail
he/she/it brails
we brail
you brail
they brail
Preterite
I brailed
you brailed
he/she/it brailed
we brailed
you brailed
they brailed
Present Continuous
I am brailing
you are brailing
he/she/it is brailing
we are brailing
you are brailing
they are brailing
Present Perfect
I have brailed
you have brailed
he/she/it has brailed
we have brailed
you have brailed
they have brailed
Past Continuous
I was brailing
you were brailing
he/she/it was brailing
we were brailing
you were brailing
they were brailing
Past Perfect
I had brailed
you had brailed
he/she/it had brailed
we had brailed
you had brailed
they had brailed
Future
I will brail
you will brail
he/she/it will brail
we will brail
you will brail
they will brail
Future Perfect
I will have brailed
you will have brailed
he/she/it will have brailed
we will have brailed
you will have brailed
they will have brailed
Future Continuous
I will be brailing
you will be brailing
he/she/it will be brailing
we will be brailing
you will be brailing
they will be brailing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been brailing
you have been brailing
he/she/it has been brailing
we have been brailing
you have been brailing
they have been brailing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been brailing
you will have been brailing
he/she/it will have been brailing
we will have been brailing
you will have been brailing
they will have been brailing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been brailing
you had been brailing
he/she/it had been brailing
we had been brailing
you had been brailing
they had been brailing
Conditional
I would brail
you would brail
he/she/it would brail
we would brail
you would brail
they would brail
Past Conditional
I would have brailed
you would have brailed
he/she/it would have brailed
we would have brailed
you would have brailed
they would have brailed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brail - a small net used to draw fish into a boat
net - a trap made of netting to catch fish or birds or insects
2.brail - a small rope (one of several) used to draw a sail in
rope - a strong line
Verb1.brail - take in a sail with a brail
furl, roll up - form into a cylinder by rolling; "Roll up the cloth"
2.brail - haul fish aboard with brails
fish - catch or try to catch fish or shellfish; "I like to go fishing on weekends"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
All hands obeyed, and at once the eight or ten seamen who composed the crew, sprang to their respective stations at the spanker brails and outhaul, topsail sheets and halyards, the jib downhaul, and the topsail clewlines and buntlines.
Then, as they were just passing the Round Tower, the young man shouted: "Stand by there to lower the topsails and jib; brail up the spanker
Why here the wind has been all day at the south, and now there’s a lull, as if the last blast was out of the bellows; and there’s a streak along the mountains, to the northard, that, just now, wasn’t wider than the bigness of your hand; and then the clouds drive afore it as you’d brail a mainsail, and the stars are heaving in sight, like so many lights and beacons, put there to warn us to pile on the wood; and, if so be that I’m a judge of weather, it’s getting to be time to build on a fire, or you'll have half of them there porter bottles, and them dimmyjohns of wine, in the locker here, breaking with the frost, afore the morning watch is called.