bravado

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bra·va·do

 (brə-vä′dō)
n. pl. bra·va·dos or bra·va·does
A show of bravery or defiance, often in order to make a false impression or mislead someone.

[French bravade and Old Spanish bravada, swagger, bravery, both ultimately from Vulgar Latin *brabus, brave; see brave.]

bravado

(brəˈvɑːdəʊ)
n, pl -does or -dos
vaunted display of courage or self-confidence; swagger
[C16: from Spanish bravada (modern bravata), from Old Italian bravare to challenge, provoke, from bravo wild, brave]

bra•va•do

(brəˈvɑ doʊ)

n., pl. -does, -dos.
an ostentatious display of courage.
[1575–85; < Sp bravada (< Italian), derivative of brav(o) brave]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bravado - a swaggering show of courage
fanfare, ostentation, flash - a gaudy outward display

bravado

noun swagger, boast, boasting, swaggering, vaunting, bluster, swashbuckling, bombast, braggadocio, boastfulness, fanfaronade (rare) The threats may be an act of bravado.
Translations
تظاهُر بالشجاعه
hraná odvaha
bravadobrovten
hõsködés
mannalæti, sÿndarhugrekki
bravūra
bravūra
predstieraná odvaha
kuru sıkı kabadayılık

bravado

[brəˈvɑːdəʊ] N (bravados or bravadoes (pl)) → bravatas fpl, baladronadas fpl
a piece of bravadouna bravata
out of sheer bravadode puro bravucón

bravado

[brəˈvɑːdəʊ] nbravade f

bravado

n (= showy bravery)Draufgängertum nt, → Wagemut m; (hiding fear) → gespielte Tapferkeit; this is just military bravadoda lässt das Militär die Muskeln spielen

bravado

[brəˈvɑːdəʊ] nspavalderia

bravado

(brəˈvaːdəu) noun
(a show of) daring. He's full of bravado, but really he's a coward.
References in classic literature ?
In a moment it was hand-to-hand fighting, and Trent was cursing already the bravado which had brought him out to the open.
It was said she had been brutally jilted by her cousin, Rutland Whitney, and that she married this unknown man from the West out of bravado.
He said it with admirable serenity, with positive unimpeachable gaiety; and doubtless it was that very note that most evoked for me the poignancy, the unnatural childish tragedy, of his probable reappearance at the end of three months with all this bravado and still more dishonor.
There was no longer any deceit or bravado in the manner of the accused.