bray


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bray 1

 (brā)
v. brayed, bray·ing, brays
v.intr.
1. To utter the loud, harsh cry of a donkey.
2. To sound loudly and harshly: The foghorn brayed all night.
v.tr.
To emit (an utterance or a sound) loudly and harshly.
n.
1. The loud, harsh cry of a donkey.
2. A sound resembling that of a donkey: "an endless bray of pointless jocosity" (Louis Auchincloss).

[Middle English braien, from Old French braire, from Vulgar Latin *bragere, of Celtic origin.]

bray 2

 (brā)
tr.v. brayed, bray·ing, brays
1. To crush and pound to a fine consistency, as in a mortar.
2. To spread (ink) thinly over a surface.

[Middle English braien, from Old French breier, of Germanic origin; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

bray

(breɪ)
vb
1. (Zoology) (intr) (of a donkey) to utter its characteristic loud harsh sound; heehaw
2. (intr) to make a similar sound, as in laughing: he brayed at the joke.
3. (tr) to utter with a loud harsh sound
n
4. (Zoology) the loud harsh sound uttered by a donkey
5. a similar loud cry or uproar: a bray of protest.
[C13: from Old French braire, probably of Celtic origin]
ˈbrayer n

bray

(breɪ)
vb
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) to distribute (ink) over printing type or plates
2. (tr) to pound into a powder, as in a mortar
3. dialect Northern English to hit or beat (someone or something) hard; bang
[C14: from Old French breier of Germanic origin; see break]
ˈbrayer n

bray1

(breɪ)

n., v. brayed, bray•ing. n.
1. the harsh cry of a donkey.
2. any similar sound.
v.i.
3. to utter a bray.
v.t.
4. to utter with a bray.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French braire to cry out < Celtic]

bray2

(breɪ)

v.t. brayed, bray•ing.
1. to crush fine, as in a mortar.
2. to thin (ink) on a slate before placing on the ink plate of a printing press.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French bra(i)er, Old French broier < Germanic; see break]

bray


Past participle: brayed
Gerund: braying

Imperative
bray
bray
Present
I bray
you bray
he/she/it brays
we bray
you bray
they bray
Preterite
I brayed
you brayed
he/she/it brayed
we brayed
you brayed
they brayed
Present Continuous
I am braying
you are braying
he/she/it is braying
we are braying
you are braying
they are braying
Present Perfect
I have brayed
you have brayed
he/she/it has brayed
we have brayed
you have brayed
they have brayed
Past Continuous
I was braying
you were braying
he/she/it was braying
we were braying
you were braying
they were braying
Past Perfect
I had brayed
you had brayed
he/she/it had brayed
we had brayed
you had brayed
they had brayed
Future
I will bray
you will bray
he/she/it will bray
we will bray
you will bray
they will bray
Future Perfect
I will have brayed
you will have brayed
he/she/it will have brayed
we will have brayed
you will have brayed
they will have brayed
Future Continuous
I will be braying
you will be braying
he/she/it will be braying
we will be braying
you will be braying
they will be braying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been braying
you have been braying
he/she/it has been braying
we have been braying
you have been braying
they have been braying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been braying
you will have been braying
he/she/it will have been braying
we will have been braying
you will have been braying
they will have been braying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been braying
you had been braying
he/she/it had been braying
we had been braying
you had been braying
they had been braying
Conditional
I would bray
you would bray
he/she/it would bray
we would bray
you would bray
they would bray
Past Conditional
I would have brayed
you would have brayed
he/she/it would have brayed
we would have brayed
you would have brayed
they would have brayed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bray - the cry of an assbray - the cry of an ass      
cry - the characteristic utterance of an animal; "animal cries filled the night"
Verb1.bray - braying characteristic of donkeys
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
2.bray - reduce to small pieces or particles by pounding or abrading; "grind the spices in a mortar"; "mash the garlic"
pulp - reduce to pulp; "pulp fruit"; "pulp wood"
pestle - grind, mash or pulverize in a mortar; "pestle the garlic"
mill - grind with a mill; "mill grain"
fragment, fragmentise, fragmentize, break up - break or cause to break into pieces; "The plate fragmented"
3.bray - laugh loudly and harshly
express joy, express mirth, laugh - produce laughter

bray

verb
1. neigh, bellow, screech, whinny, heehaw The donkey brayed and tried to bolt.
2. roar, trumpet, bellow, hoot Neil brayed with angry laughter.
noun
1. neigh, bellow, screech, whinny, heehaw It was a strange laugh, like the bray of a donkey.
2. roar, cry, shout, bellow, screech, hoot, bawl, harsh sound She cut him off with a bray of laughter.

bray

verb
To break up into tiny particles:
Translations
ينهق
hýkáníhýkat
skrydeskryden
szamárordítás
rymjarymur
brēciensbrēkt
híkaniehíkať
anırmaanırmak

bray

[breɪ]
A. N [of ass] → rebuzno m; (= laugh) → carcajada f
B. VI [ass] → rebuznar; [trumpet] → sonar con estrépito

bray

[ˈbreɪ]
nbraiment m
vibraire

bray

n (of ass)(Esels)schrei m; (inf, = laugh) → Wiehern nt, → Gewieher nt
vi (ass)schreien; (inf, person) → wiehern

bray

[breɪ]
1. nraglio
2. viragliare

bray

(brei) noun
the cry of an ass.
verb
to make such a cry.
References in classic literature ?
I can bray to perfection, and if you can ever so little, the thing's as good as done.
As soon as he saw him his owner said, 'I was wondering he did not answer, for if he wasn't dead he'd have brayed when he heard us, or he'd have been no ass; but for the sake of having heard you bray to such perfection, gossip, I count the trouble I have taken to look for him well bestowed, even though I have found him dead.
But I can't help it, my dear; my donkey head wants to bray continually," he replied.
said Mr Bray, putting out his hand, and opening and shutting his bony fingers with irritable impatience.
And thus ended his first interview with Madeline Bray.
Lord Bulmer's sister, Juliet Bray, was coming slowly across the lawn, accompanied by one gentleman and followed by two others.
Juliet Bray was an attractive lady with dark hair and eyebrows and dancing eyes, and there was a geniality and even generosity in her rather imperious ways.
He had no doubt that the great bull's voice of Francis Bray, Baron Bulmer, had been heard for the last time between the darkness and the lifting dawn.
Juliet Bray had confronted the catastrophe of her brother's disappearance with a somber stoicism in which there was, perhaps, more paralysis than pain; but when the other question came to the surface she was both agitated and angry.
He was recalled from his irrelevance by the voice of Juliet Bray, which rang out with an altogether new note of decision:
Instead of moans and cries, they burst forth into loud donkey brays, which sounded very much like, "Haw
Dr Bray is survived by his widow and four daughters.