breach


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Related to breach: anticipatory breach
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breach
humpback whale breaching

breach

 (brēch)
n.
1.
a. An opening, tear, or rupture.
b. A gap or rift, especially in a solid structure such as a dike or fortification.
2. A violation or infraction, as of a contract, law, legal obligation, or promise.
3. A breaking up or disruption of friendly relations; an estrangement.
4. A leap of a whale from the water.
5. The breaking of waves or surf.
v. breached, breach·ing, breach·es
v.tr.
1. To make a hole or gap in; break through.
2. To break or violate (an agreement, for example).
v.intr.
1. To leap from the water: waiting for the whale to breach.
2. To develop a hole or opening. Used especially of protective embankments: The rising river caused the levee to breach.

[Middle English breche, from Old English brēc; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: breach, infraction, violation, transgression, trespass, infringement
These nouns denote an act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of failing to fulfill a duty, obligation, or promise. Breach and infraction are the least specific; when applied to lawbreaking they may imply a relatively minor offense, but they are also widely used in nonlegal contexts: Revealing the secret would be a breach of trust. Their behavior amounted to an infraction of the unwritten social code. Violation generally applies to the breaking of an explicit law or rule (a traffic violation; a violation of international law); it can also imply a failing to follow a moral or ethical standard: a violation of human rights; a violation of one's privacy. Transgression and trespass most often apply to divine or moral law: "She had said that the transgression was all the more shocking because the official was charged with enforcing federal laws against sexual harassment" (Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson). "The act of torture is such an extreme trespass against the laws of war that it may seem beside the point to wonder whether any other forms of wrongdoing have been carried out" (Elaine Scarry).
Infringement is most frequently used to denote encroachment on another's rights: "Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom" (William Pitt the Younger).

breach

(briːtʃ)
n
1. a crack, break, or rupture
2. a breaking, infringement, or violation of a promise, obligation, etc
3. any severance or separation: there was a breach between the two factions of the party.
4. (Military) a gap in an enemy's fortifications or line of defence created by bombardment or attack
5. (Zoology) the act of a whale in breaking clear of the water
6. (Physical Geography) the breaking of sea waves on a shore or rock
7. (Pathology) an obsolete word for wound1
vb
8. (tr) to break through or make an opening, hole, or incursion in
9. (Zoology) (tr) to break a promise, law, etc
10. (intr) (of a whale) to break clear of the water
[Old English bræc; influenced by Old French brèche, from Old High German brecha, from brechan to break]

breach

(britʃ)
n.
1. an infraction or violation, as of a law, trust, faith, or promise.
2. a gap made in a wall, fortification, line of soldiers, etc.; rift; fissure.
3. the act or a result of breaking; break or rupture.
4. a severance of friendly relations.
5. the leap of a whale above the surface of the water.
6. Archaic. the breaking of waves.
7. Obs. a wound.
v.t.
8. to make a breach or opening in.
9. to break or act contrary to.
v.i.
10. (of a whale) to leap out of the water and land with a loud splash.
[before 1000; Middle English breche, Old English bræc breaking; see break]
breach′er, n.
syn: breach, infraction, violation all denote an act of breaking or disregarding a legal or moral code. breach is most often used of a legal offense, but it may refer to the breaking of any code of conduct: breach of contract; breach of etiquette. infraction most often refers to the breaking of clearly formulated rules or laws: an infraction of regulations. violation often suggests a willful, forceful refusal to obey: done in violation of instructions.

breach

- The leap of a whale out of the water or the breaking of waves over a vessel or onto a coast; it is also the act of breaking.
See also related terms for waves.

breach


Past participle: breached
Gerund: breaching

Imperative
breach
breach
Present
I breach
you breach
he/she/it breaches
we breach
you breach
they breach
Preterite
I breached
you breached
he/she/it breached
we breached
you breached
they breached
Present Continuous
I am breaching
you are breaching
he/she/it is breaching
we are breaching
you are breaching
they are breaching
Present Perfect
I have breached
you have breached
he/she/it has breached
we have breached
you have breached
they have breached
Past Continuous
I was breaching
you were breaching
he/she/it was breaching
we were breaching
you were breaching
they were breaching
Past Perfect
I had breached
you had breached
he/she/it had breached
we had breached
you had breached
they had breached
Future
I will breach
you will breach
he/she/it will breach
we will breach
you will breach
they will breach
Future Perfect
I will have breached
you will have breached
he/she/it will have breached
we will have breached
you will have breached
they will have breached
Future Continuous
I will be breaching
you will be breaching
he/she/it will be breaching
we will be breaching
you will be breaching
they will be breaching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been breaching
you have been breaching
he/she/it has been breaching
we have been breaching
you have been breaching
they have been breaching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been breaching
you will have been breaching
he/she/it will have been breaching
we will have been breaching
you will have been breaching
they will have been breaching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been breaching
you had been breaching
he/she/it had been breaching
we had been breaching
you had been breaching
they had been breaching
Conditional
I would breach
you would breach
he/she/it would breach
we would breach
you would breach
they would breach
Past Conditional
I would have breached
you would have breached
he/she/it would have breached
we would have breached
you would have breached
they would have breached
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breach - a failure to perform some promised act or obligation
failure - an unexpected omission; "he resented my failure to return his call"; "the mechanic's failure to check the brakes"
breach of contract - a breach of a legal duty; failure to do something that is required in a contract
breach of duty - a breach of due care
2.breach - an opening (especially a gap in a dike or fortification)
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
3.breach - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions)breach - a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions); "they hoped to avoid a break in relations"
schism - the formal separation of a church into two churches or the withdrawal of one group over doctrinal differences
breakup, separation, detachment - coming apart
Verb1.breach - act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promisesbreach - act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promises; "offend all laws of humanity"; "violate the basic laws or human civilization"; "break a law"; "break a promise"
disrespect - show a lack of respect for
sin, transgress, trespass - commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law
blunder, boob, drop the ball, goof, sin - commit a faux pas or a fault or make a serious mistake; "I blundered during the job interview"
contravene, infringe, run afoul, conflict - go against, as of rules and laws; "He ran afoul of the law"; "This behavior conflicts with our rules"
trespass - break the law
trespass, intrude - enter unlawfully on someone's property; "Don't trespass on my land!"
2.breach - make an opening or gap in
open, open up - cause to open or to become open; "Mary opened the car door"

breach

verb
2. break through, split, rupture, burst through Fire may have breached the cargo tanks and set the oil ablaze.
noun
1. nonobservance, abuse, violation, infringement, trespass, disobedience, transgression, contravention, infraction, noncompliance The congressman was accused of a breach of secrecy laws.
nonobservance performance, honouring, observation, discharge, compliance, fulfilment, adherence to
3. opening, crack, break, hole, split, gap, rent, rift, rupture, aperture, chasm, cleft, fissure A large battering ram hammered a breach in the wall.
Quotations
"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more" [William Shakespeare Henry V]
see breech

breach

noun
1. An opening, especially in a solid structure:
2. An act or instance of breaking a law or regulation or of nonfulfillment of an obligation or promise, for example:
3. An interruption in friendly relations:
verb
1. To make a hole or other opening in:
2. To fail to fulfill (a promise) or conform to (a regulation):
Translations
فجوة، ثغرهنكث الوعديفتح ثغرة
mezeraporušeníprolomittrhlina
brudbryde
murtumamurtuminenvälirikko
rés: rést üt
brot, rofrjúfa, gera skarîskarî, rof, geil
pralaužtiprasilaužtispragasulaužymasviešosios tvarkos laužymas
caurumsizsist caurumu / robupārkāpšana, neievērošanapārkāpt, neievērotrobs
prelomiť
bozmaçatlakgedikgedik açmakihlâl

breach

[briːtʃ]
A. N
1. (= violation) [of law etc] → violación f, infracción f
breach of confidence or faithabuso m de confianza
breach of contractincumplimiento m de contrato
to be in breach of a ruleincumplir una regla
breach of the peace (Jur) → perturbación f del orden público
breach of privilege (Parl) → abuso m del privilegio parlamentario
breach of promiseincumplimiento m de la palabra de casamiento
breach of securityfallo m de seguridad
2. (= gap) (in wall, Mil) → brecha f
to fill the breach; step into the breachllenar el vacío
3. (= estrangement) → ruptura f; (between friends) (= act) → rompimiento m de relaciones; (= state) → desavenencia f
to heal the breachhacer las paces
B. VT
1. [+ defences, wall] → abrir brecha en
2. [+ security] → poner en peligro
C. VI [whale] → salir a la superficie

breach

[ˈbriːtʃ]
vt
[+ defences] → ouvrir une brèche dans
[+ agreement] → rompre
[+ law] → enfreindre
[+ promise] → manquer à
[+ security] → déjouer
[+ wall] → faire un trou dans
n
(= gap) → brèche f
to step into the breach (= take over)
I was persuaded to step into the breach temporarily → On m'a convaincu de prendre la relève à titre temporaire.
(= estrangement) → brouille f breach of contract, breach of security, breach of the peace, breach of trustbreach of contract nrupture f de contratbreach of security nmanquement m au règles de sécuritébreach of the peace natteinte f à l'ordre publicbreach of trust nabus m de confiance

breach

n
Verletzung f (→ of +gen), → Verstoß m(of gegen); (of law)Übertretung f (→ of +gen), → Verstoß m; a breach of confidence/contract/faithein Vertrauens-/Vertrags-/Vertrauensbruch m; a breach of lawein Rechtsbruch m; a breach of ruleeine Regelwidrigkeit f; (Sport) → eine Regelverletzung f; a breach of securityein Verstoß mgegen die Sicherheitsbestimmungen; breach of the peace (Jur) → öffentliche Ruhestörung; breach of privilegePrivilegienmissbrauch m; breach of promise (Jur) → Bruch mdes Eheversprechens
(= estrangement: in friendship etc) → Bruch m
(= gap, in wall etc) → Bresche f, → Lücke f; (in security) → Lücke f; to make a breach in the enemy’s lines (Mil) → eine Bresche in die feindlichen Linien schlagen; to step into the breach (fig)in die Bresche springen
vt
walleine Bresche schlagen in (+acc); defences, securitydurchbrechen
contract, treatyverletzen

breach

[briːtʃ]
1. n
a. (violation, of law) → violazione f; (of rules) → infrazione f; (of duty) → abuso
b. (gap, in wall) → apertura, varco (Mil) → breccia; (estrangement) → rottura
2. vt (defences) → far breccia in

breach

(briːtʃ) noun
1. a breaking (of a promise etc).
2. a gap, break or hole. a breach in the castle wall; a breach in security.
verb
to make an opening in or break (someone's defence).
breach of the peace
a riot, disturbance or public fight. guilty of breach of the peace.
References in classic literature ?
March, for all had learned by experience that when Jo was in that mood words were wasted, and the wisest course was to wait till some little accident, or her own generous nature, softened Jo's resentment and healed the breach.
We held the treaty within sixty yards of the garrison, on purpose to divert them from a breach of honour, as we could not avoid suspicions of the savages.
And be the stern and sad truth spoken, that the breach which guilt has once made into the human soul is never, in this mortal state, repaired.
Much as I had made of the fact that this name had never once, between us, been sounded, the quick, smitten glare with which the child's face now received it fairly likened my breach of the silence to the smash of a pane of glass.
Excepting the sublime breach --somewhere else to be described --this peaking of the whale's flukes is perhaps the grandest sight to be seen in all animated nature.
But the great mass of those who came from a distance always ran the risk and took the chances, preferring the loss of a train to a breach of good manners and the discomfort of being unpleasantly conspicuous during a stretch of three or four hours.
She hurled one in return, and the angry breach was complete.
Man has done nothing for her; she has no family to speak of, no money, no education worthy the name, has had no advantages of any sort; but Dame Nature flung herself into the breach and said:--
Dashwood feel this ungracious behaviour, and so earnestly did she despise her daughter-in-law for it, that, on the arrival of the latter, she would have quitted the house for ever, had not the entreaty of her eldest girl induced her first to reflect on the propriety of going, and her own tender love for all her three children determined her afterwards to stay, and for their sakes avoid a breach with their brother.
Miss Ingram rose solemnly: "I go first," she said, in a tone which might have befitted the leader of a forlorn hope, mounting a breach in the van of his men.
He had committed a breach of discipline, and a breach of trust.
But the gallantry of her friends would not allow of this; and the man in faded black, mounting the breach first, produced his plunder.