breadfruit


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bread·fruit

 (brĕd′fro͞ot′)
n.
1. An evergreen tree (Artocarpus altilis) first domesticated in New Guinea and Oceania and cultivated for its large round starchy edible fruits.
2. The fruit of this tree.

breadfruit

(ˈbrɛdˌfruːt)
n, pl -fruits or -fruit
1. (Plants) a moraceous tree, Artocarpus communis (or A. altilis), of the Pacific Islands, having large round edible starchy usually seedless, fruit
2. (Plants) the fruit of this tree, which is eaten baked or roasted and has a texture like bread

bread•fruit

(ˈbrɛdˌfrut)

n.
1. a large round starchy fruit borne by a tree, Artocarpus altilis, of the mulberry family, native to the Pacific islands: eaten baked or roasted.
2. this tree itself.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breadfruit - native to Pacific islands and having edible fruit with a texture like breadbreadfruit - native to Pacific islands and having edible fruit with a texture like bread
breadfruit - a large round seedless or seeded fruit with a texture like bread; eaten boiled or baked or roasted or ground into flour; the roasted seeds resemble chestnuts
Artocarpus, genus Artocarpus - evergreen Asiatic trees now grown through the tropics: breadfruit; jackfruit
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.breadfruit - a large round seedless or seeded fruit with a texture like bread; eaten boiled or baked or roasted or ground into flour; the roasted seeds resemble chestnuts
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
Artocarpus altilis, Artocarpus communis, breadfruit, breadfruit tree - native to Pacific islands and having edible fruit with a texture like bread
Translations
hedelmäleipäpuu
cây sa kêquả sa kêtrái sa kê

breadfruit

[ˈbredfruːt]
A. N (breadfruit or breadfruits (pl)) → fruto m del árbol del pan
B. CPD breadfruit tree Nárbol m del pan

breadfruit

[ˈbrɛdfruːt] nfruit m de l'arbre à painbread knife ncouteau m à pain

breadfruit

[ˈbrɛdˌfruːt] nfrutto dell'albero del pane
References in classic literature ?
I had seen a sailor who had visited that very island, and he told me that it was the custom, when a great battle had been gained there, to barbecue all the slain in the yard or garden of the victor; and then, one by one, they were placed in great wooden trenchers, and garnished round like a pilau, with breadfruit and cocoanuts; and with some parsley in their mouths, were sent round with the victor's compliments to all his friends, just as though these presents were so many Christmas turkeys.
I think about Tahiti, and breadfruit, and jolly good time at Bora Bora.
Coconut palms, banana trees, and lofty breadfruit trees gave food and sun-shelter.
Later, after what had been to him a terrible journey of miles, when he collapsed in front of the devil-devil house in the shadow of the breadfruit tree, she had shown very lively ideas on the matter of retaining possession of him.
Mike Whatmore is giving a talk, St Vincent, Captain Bligh, the Bounty and Breadfruit, to the Houghall Horticultural Society at 7.
St Vincent, rich with breadfruit trees and arrowroot (used to make paper and to thicken sauces) is the largest of the more than 30 islands which make up the nation of St Vincent and the Grenadines covering roughly 150 sq miles.
Under a shelter near the garden entrance, a guide shows you breadfruit, passion fruit, guavas, sprouting coconuts, and other fruits or seeds you may see along the trail.
The first model farm for the cultivation of breadfruit was launched in Pamplemousses yesterday in presence of the Minister of Agro-Industry and Food Security, Mr S.
The first resort to combine over-the-top luxury with hand-crafted design materials like: carved kahia & coconut wood, roof thatching woven on the island, tapa cloths pounded from the breadfruit tree and chandeliers made from Tahitian black pearl shells.
Houghall Horticultural Society, talk, St Vincent, Captain Bligh, The Bounty and Breadfruit, by Mike Whatmore, Conference Hall, Houghall College, Durham, 7.
1787: The Bounty was launched at Spithead: Thecollier ship Bethia, renamed HMS Bounty sailed from Spithead with Captain William Bligh and a crew of 45 men bound for Tahiti to collect breadfruit plants to be transplanted in the West Indies as cheap food for slaves.
As happy ships go, Old Trafford has lately ranked somewhere alongside HMS Bounty around the time that Captain Bligh clamped several crew members in leg-irons for bruising a breadfruit.