breadth

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breadth

 (brĕdth)
n.
1. The measure or dimension from side to side; width.
2. A piece usually produced in a standard width: a breadth of canvas.
3.
a. Wide range or scope: breadth of knowledge.
b. Tolerance; broadmindedness: a jurist of great breadth and wisdom.
4. An effect of unified, encompassing vision in an artistic composition.

[Middle English bredth, breth, alteration (on the model of length, length) of brede, from Old English brǣd.]

breadth

(brɛdθ; brɛtθ)
n
1. the linear extent or measurement of something from side to side; width
2. (Textiles) a piece of fabric having a standard or definite width
3. distance, extent, size, or dimension
4. openness and lack of restriction, esp of viewpoint or interest; liberality
[C16: from obsolete brēde (from Old English brǣdu, from brād broad) + -th1; related to Gothic braidei, Old High German breitī]

breadth

(brɛdθ, brɛtθ, brɛθ)

n.
1. the measure of the second largest dimension of a plane or solid figure; width.
2. an extent or piece of something of definite or full width or as measured by its width: a breadth of cloth.
3. freedom from narrowness, as of viewpoint or interests.
4. size in general; extent; scope.
[1515–25; earlier bredeth]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breadth - the capacity to understand a broad range of topics; "a teacher must have a breadth of knowledge of the subject"; "a man distinguished by the largeness and scope of his views"
intelligence - the ability to comprehend; to understand and profit from experience
capaciousness, roominess - intellectual breadth; "the very capaciousness of the idea meant that agreement on fundamentals was unnecessary"; "his unselfishness gave him great intellectual roominess"
2.breadth - the extent of something from side to side
dimension - the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height)
broadness, wideness - the property of being wide; having great width
beam - (nautical) breadth amidships
narrowness - the property of being narrow; having little width; "the narrowness of the road"

breadth

noun
1. width, spread, beam, span, latitude, broadness, wideness The breadth of the whole camp was 400 metres.
2. extent, area, reach, range, measure, size, scale, spread, sweep, scope, magnitude, compass, expanse, vastness, amplitude, comprehensiveness, extensiveness The breadth of his knowledge filled me with admiration.

breadth

noun
The extent of something from side to side:
Translations
سعة الصدر، مدىعرْضمساحة تساوي عرْض الشيء
šířkašíře
breddetoleranceudsynvidde
belvilágszéles látókör
breiddyfirgrip, víîsÿni
platumasplotis
plašumsplatums
širina

breadth

[bretθ] N
1. (= width) → anchura f, ancho m
to be two metres in breadthtener dos metros de ancho
2. (fig) [of experience, knowledge] → amplitud f

breadth

[ˈbrɛdθ ˈbrɛtθ] n
(= dimension) → largeur f
[knowledge, experience] → étendue f
the length and breadth of sth (= throughout) → d'un bout à l'autre de qch

breadth

nBreite f; (of ideas, theory)(Band)breite f; a hundred metres (Brit) or meters (US) in breadthhundert Meter breit; his breadth of outlook (= open-mindedness)seine große Aufgeschlossenheit; (= variety of interests)seine große Vielseitigkeit; the breadth of his comprehensionsein umfassendes Verständnis

breadth

[brɛtθ] n (also) (fig) → larghezza
to be 2 metres in breadth → misurare 2 metri di larghezza, essere largo/a 2 metri

breadth

(bredθ) noun
1. width; size from side to side. the breadth of a table.
2. scope or extent. breadth of outlook.
3. a distance equal to the width (of a swimming-pool etc).
References in classic literature ?
There is one place where two breadths didn't match, and the eyes go all up and down the line, one a little higher than the other.
They were from fifty to one hundred yards long, and they gradually tapered from a nine-log breadth at their sterns, to a three-log breadth at their bow-ends.
Space, my Lord, is height and breadth indefinitely prolonged.
William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
Borne backward to the earth, he saw above him the dead and drawn face within a hand's breadth of his own, and then all was black.
Soon after we discovered the isle of Babelmandel, which gives name to the strait so called, and parts the sea that surrounds it into two channels; that on the side of Arabia is not above a quarter of a league in breadth, and through this pass almost all the vessels that trade to or from the Red Sea.
Nor, having only length, breadth, and thickness, can a cube have a real existence.
This distinguished scientist has expounded his views in a book entitled "Verschwinden und Seine Theorie," which has attracted some attention, "particularly," says one writer, "among the followers of Hegel, and mathematicians who hold to the actual existence of a so- called non-Euclidean space--that is to say, of space which has more dimensions than length, breadth, and thickness--space in which it would be possible to tie a knot in an endless cord and to turn a rubber ball inside out without 'a solution of its continuity,' or in other words, without breaking or cracking it.
He was a dark man altogether, with good eyes and a good bold breadth between them.
Broad was Robin across the shoulders, but broader was the stranger by twice the breadth of a palm, while he measured at least an ell around the waist.
Pearl, looking at this bright wonder of a house began to caper and dance, and imperatively required that the whole breadth of sunshine should be stripped off its front, and given her to play with.
No wonder his thoughts were still with his loom and his money when he made his journeys through the fields and the lanes to fetch and carry home his work, so that his steps never wandered to the hedge-banks and the lane-side in search of the once familiar herbs: these too belonged to the past, from which his life had shrunk away, like a rivulet that has sunk far down from the grassy fringe of its old breadth into a little shivering thread, that cuts a groove for itself in the barren sand.