stride

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Related to break stride: take it on the chin, break new ground, cut some slack, run an errand

stride

 (strīd)
v. strode (strōd), strid·den (strĭd′n), strid·ing, strides
v.intr.
1. To walk with long steps, especially in a hasty or vigorous way.
2. To take a single long step, as in passing over an obstruction.
3. To stand or sit astride; straddle.
v.tr.
1. To walk with long steps on, along, or over: striding the stage.
2. To step over or across: stride a brook.
3. To be astride of; straddle.
n.
1. The act of striding.
2.
a. A single long step.
b. The distance traveled in such a step.
3.
a. A single coordinated movement of the four legs of a horse or other animal, completed when the legs return to their initial relative position.
b. The distance traveled in such a movement.
4. often strides A step of progress; an advance: making great strides in their studies.
Idioms:
hit (one's) stride
1. To achieve a steady, effective pace.
2. To attain a maximum level of competence.
take in stride
To cope with calmly, without interrupting one's normal routine: taking their newfound wealth in stride.

[Middle English striden, from Old English strīdan.]

strid′er n.

stride

(straɪd)
n
1. a long step or pace
2. the space measured by such a step
3. a striding gait
4. (Zoology) an act of forward movement by an animal, completed when the legs have returned to their initial relative positions
5. progress or development (esp in the phrase make rapid strides)
6. a regular pace or rate of progress: to get into one's stride; to be put off one's stride.
7. (Rowing) rowing the distance covered between strokes
8. (Jazz) jazz Also called: stride piano a piano style characterized by single bass notes on the first and third beats and chords on the second and fourth
9. (Clothing & Fashion) (plural) informal chiefly Austral men's trousers
10. take something in one's stride to do something without difficulty or effort
vb, strides, striding, strode or stridden
11. (intr) to walk with long regular or measured paces, as in haste, etc
12. (tr) to cover or traverse by striding: he strode thirty miles.
13. (often foll by: over, across, etc) to cross (over a space, obstacle, etc) with a stride
14. (Rowing) (intr) rowing to achieve the desired rhythm in a racing shell
[Old English strīdan; related to Old High German strītan to quarrel; see straddle]
ˈstrider n

stride

(straɪd)

v. strode, strid•den (ˈstrɪd n)
strid•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to walk with long steps.
2. to straddle.
v.t.
3. to walk with long steps over or along: to stride the deck.
4. to pass over in one long step: to stride a ditch.
5. to straddle.
n.
6. a striding manner or gait.
7. a long step in walking.
8. a progressive movement, as of a horse, composed of characteristic steps in which each foot is returned to its relative starting position.
9. the distance covered in a stride.
10. a steady natural pace.
11. a step forward in development or progress.
Idioms:
1. hit one's stride,
a. to achieve a steady pace.
b. to reach the level at which one functions most competently.
2. take in stride, to deal with calmly or acceptingly.
[before 900; (v.) Middle English; Old English strīdan, c. Middle Low German strīden to set the legs apart]
strid′er, n.

stride


Past participle: stridden
Gerund: striding

Imperative
stride
stride
Present
I stride
you stride
he/she/it strides
we stride
you stride
they stride
Preterite
I strode
you strode
he/she/it strode
we strode
you strode
they strode
Present Continuous
I am striding
you are striding
he/she/it is striding
we are striding
you are striding
they are striding
Present Perfect
I have stridden
you have stridden
he/she/it has stridden
we have stridden
you have stridden
they have stridden
Past Continuous
I was striding
you were striding
he/she/it was striding
we were striding
you were striding
they were striding
Past Perfect
I had stridden
you had stridden
he/she/it had stridden
we had stridden
you had stridden
they had stridden
Future
I will stride
you will stride
he/she/it will stride
we will stride
you will stride
they will stride
Future Perfect
I will have stridden
you will have stridden
he/she/it will have stridden
we will have stridden
you will have stridden
they will have stridden
Future Continuous
I will be striding
you will be striding
he/she/it will be striding
we will be striding
you will be striding
they will be striding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been striding
you have been striding
he/she/it has been striding
we have been striding
you have been striding
they have been striding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been striding
you will have been striding
he/she/it will have been striding
we will have been striding
you will have been striding
they will have been striding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been striding
you had been striding
he/she/it had been striding
we had been striding
you had been striding
they had been striding
Conditional
I would stride
you would stride
he/she/it would stride
we would stride
you would stride
they would stride
Past Conditional
I would have stridden
you would have stridden
he/she/it would have stridden
we would have stridden
you would have stridden
they would have stridden
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stride - a step in walking or runningstride - a step in walking or running  
walk, walking - the act of traveling by foot; "walking is a healthy form of exercise"
step - the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down; "he walked with unsteady steps"
2.stride - the distance covered by a stepstride - the distance covered by a step; "he stepped off ten paces from the old tree and began to dig"
indefinite quantity - an estimated quantity
3.stride - significant progress (especially in the phrase "make strides"); "they made big strides in productivity"
progress, advancement - gradual improvement or growth or development; "advancement of knowledge"; "great progress in the arts"
Verb1.stride - walk with long steps; "He strode confidently across the hall"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
2.stride - cover or traverse by taking long steps; "She strode several miles towards the woods"
cross, cut across, cut through, get over, traverse, pass over, get across, track, cover - travel across or pass over; "The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day"

stride

verb
1. march, walk, stalk, pace, tread, strut He turned abruptly and strode off down the corridor.
noun
1. step, pace, footstep He walked with long strides.
take something in your stride deal or cope with easily, think nothing of, not bat an eyelid, not be fazed by I was struck by how she took the mistake in her stride.

stride

verb
1. To walk with long steps, especially in a vigorous manner:
2. To sit or stand with a leg on each side of:
Translations
خُطْوَهيَخْطو
dlouhý krokkráčet
langt skridtmarcheretrave
harpataharppausharppoa
lép: nagyokat lép
skálma, skrefastór skref
daryti didelę pažangąlengvai susidoroti su
iet platiem soļiemplats solis
dlhý krok
hojakoračitikorak
uzun adımuzun adımlarla yürümek

stride

[straɪd] (strode (vb: pt) (stridden (pp)))
A. Nzancada f, tranco m; (in measuring) → paso m
to make great strides (fig) → hacer grandes progresos
to get into or hit one's stridecoger or (LAm) agarrar el ritmo
to take things in one's stride or > in stride (US) → tomar las cosas con calma
to put sb off their stride (Brit) → hacer perder los papeles a algn
B. VI (also stride along) → andar a zancadas
C. VT
1. (o.f.) [+ horse] → montar a horcajadas sobre
2. (= cross) [+ deck, yard etc] → cruzar de un tranco
stride away stride off VI + ADValejarse a grandes zancadas
stride up VI + ADV to stride up to sbacercarse resueltamente a algn
to stride up and downandar de aquí para allá a pasos largos

stride

[ˈstraɪd]
n
(= long step) (when walking)enjambée f; (when running)foulée f
He walked with long strides → Il marchait à longues enjambées.
(= gait) (when walking)démarche f; (when running)foulée f
He had a purposeful stride → Il avait une démarche décidée.
to take sth in one's stride (British) (fig) [+ changes, problem] → accepter qch sans sourciller
(= progress) → avancée f
to make enormous strides → faire d'énormes avancées
vi [strode] (pt) [stridden] (pp) → marcher à grands pas
to stride across sth → arpenter qch
Louisa watched him striding across the lawn → Louisa le regarda arpenter la pelouse.
to stride off → s'éloigner à grands pas

stride

vb: pret <strode>, ptp <stridden>
n (= step)Schritt m; (= gait also)Gang m; (fig)Fortschritt m; to get into or hit one’s stride (fig)in Schwung or in Fahrt kommen; to take something in one’s stride (Brit) or in stride (US) → mit etw spielend fertig werden; exam, interviewetw spielend schaffen; to put somebody off his/her stridejdn aus dem Konzept bringen; he took everything in his stridees schien alles spurlos an ihm vorübergegangen zu sein
vischreiten (geh), → mit großen Schritten gehen; to stride alongausschreiten (geh); to stride away or offsich mit schnellen Schritten entfernen, davonschreiten (geh); to stride up to somebody(mit großen Schritten) auf jdn zugehen, auf jdn zuschreiten (geh); to stride up and downauf- und abgehen or -schreiten (geh)

stride

[straɪd] (strode (vb: pt) (stridden (pp))) [ˈstrɪdn]
1. npasso, falcata
to get into one's stride (fig) → trovare il ritmo giusto
to take sth in one's stride (fig) (changes) → prendere con tranquillità (exam) → sostenere senza grossi problemi
to make great strides (fig) → fare passi da gigante
2. vi to stride in/outentrare/uscire a grandi passi
to stride along → camminare a grandi passi
to stride up and down → camminare avanti e indietro

stride

(straid) past tensestrode (stroud) : past participlestridden (ˈstridn) verb
to walk with long steps. He strode along the path; He strode off in anger.
noun
a long step. He walked with long strides.
make great strides
to progress well. He's making great strides in his piano-playing.
take in one's stride
to accept or cope with (a matter) successfully without worrying about it. She takes difficulties in her stride.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps he'd been mindful of the greasy surface and didn't want to miss his kick - but City, who last week received the paperwork as they consider a move up the pyramid - were made to pay for their wastefulness in front of the target when a cross was centred from the left and Lee Gustard didn't break stride as he fired a screamer over the stranded keeper ballooning into the net for the second goal.
Commons didn't break stride as he swept high past Fabiano.
The midfielder did not break stride as he volleyed a superb effort into the bottom-right corner, before dashing off to celebrate with the jubilant massed ranks of travelling support behind the goal.
Roberto Martinez was well aware of Emery's words but did not break stride in his pursuit of the Barcelona player.
And we will prevail,'' Perry said before walking inside the building, where he set off a metal detector but didn't break stride, heading straight to a first-floor office to have his fingerprints taken and stand for the mug shot.
Edin Dzeko held his head after missing the target, then came a dream moment for Sunderland fans as Giaccherini broke from his home half, delivered an excellent pass to Wickham who did not break stride as he buried his shot.
McKenzie didn't have to break stride as he gathered possession before slotting past the advancing keeper.
Cahill didn't even break stride as he strode onto the pass and side-footed home with aplomb on 19 minutes.
Kitson, who delivered a bravura performance last night despite feeling unwell enough to have to break stride to ask for a chair, is a master storyteller, here weaving a tender and captivating tale from thousands of letters he claims to have discovered in a village house he was thinking of buying.