breakage


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break·age

 (brā′kĭj)
n.
1. The act of breaking.
2. A quantity broken.
3. Loss or damage as a result of breaking.
4. A commercial allowance for loss or damage.

breakage

(ˈbreɪkɪdʒ)
n
1. the act or result of breaking
2. the quantity or amount broken: the total breakage was enormous.
3. (Commerce) compensation or allowance for goods damaged while in use, transit, etc

break•age

(ˈbreɪ kɪdʒ)

n.
1. the act of breaking or the state of being broken.
2. the amount or quantity of things broken.
3. an allowance or compensation for articles broken, as in transit.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breakage - the quantity broken; "the total breakage was huge"
indefinite quantity - an estimated quantity
2.breakage - reimbursement for goods damaged while in transit or in use
reimbursement - compensation paid (to someone) for damages or losses or money already spent etc.; "he received reimbursement for his travel expenses"
3.breakage - the act of breaking somethingbreakage - the act of breaking something; "the breakage was unavoidable"
change of integrity - the act of changing the unity or wholeness of something
rupture - the act of making a sudden noisy break
shattering, smashing - the act of breaking something into small pieces
cracking, fracture, crack - the act of cracking something
chipping, splintering, chip - the act of chipping something

breakage

noun break, cut, tear, crack, rent, breach, fracture, rift, rupture, cleft, fissure Use a wooden-toothed comb to avoid breakages.

breakage

noun
An act, instance, or consequence of breaking:
Translations
lomrozbité věcirozbití
beskadigelsebrud
töréskár
brot, brotnun
rozbitierozbitý tovar
kırılmakırmaparçalanma

breakage

[ˈbreɪkɪdʒ] N (= act of breaking) → rotura f; (= thing broken) → destrozo m

breakage

[ˈbreɪkɪdʒ] ncasse f
to pay for breakages → payer la casse

breakage

n
(in chain, link) → Bruch m
(of glass, china)Bruch m; to pay for breakagesfür zerbrochene Ware or Bruch bezahlen; were there any breakages?hat es Bruch gegeben?, ist irgendetwas kaputtgegangen or zu Bruch gegangen?

breakage

[ˈbreɪkɪdʒ] ndanni mpl
to pay for breakages → pagare i danni

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.

breakage

n. rotura, quebradura;
bone ___fractura ósea.
References in classic literature ?
The hiss of the quenched element, the breakage of a pitcher which I flung from my hand when I had emptied it, and, above all, the splash of the shower-bath I had liberally bestowed, roused Mr.
I therefore resolved to go about the thing more directly; so, at the start, I dispensed with ballast altogether, excepting as a provision for cases of special emergency, such as the breakage of my apparatus, or the necessity of ascending very suddenly, so as to avoid unforeseen obstacles.
After some breakage of the office furniture, the editor (an ex-college athlete), ably assisted by the business manager, an advertising agent, and the porter, succeeded in removing Martin from the office and in accelerating, by initial impulse, his descent of the first flight of stairs.
I doubt whether any rock, even as soft as chalk, would yield at this rate excepting on the most exposed coasts; though no doubt the degradation of a lofty cliff would be more rapid from the breakage of the fallen fragments.
The old Camorrist had the stem of a liqueur-glass between his swollen blue fingers, one of which had been cut in the breakage, and the livid flesh was also brown with the last blood that it would ever shed.
My dear,' returned the cherub, looking at them both, 'you broke so much in the first--Gush, if I may so express myself--that I think I am equal to a good large breakage now.
By switching from a manual application and contracting process to one that is done online using web based applications and secure electronic signatures, companies can dramatically reduce the breakage that occurs at the back-end of the sales process," said Diorio.
The kit has undergone a complete makeover inside and out, offering six-times more protection against hair breakage.
Men who had experienced condom breakage or slippage during sex reported a significantly higher number of errors than those who had not encountered these problems (5.
The higher tooth breakage 15,000 years ago could be explained by high densities of carnivores and brutal competition for prey, says Van Valkenburgh.
Incorrect condom use and frequent breakage among female sex workers and their clients.
indicative breakage costs on the outstanding borrowings total [pounds sterling]0.