breakout


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break·out

 (brāk′out′)
n.
1. A forceful emergence from a restrictive condition or situation.
2. A sudden manifestation or increase, as of a disease; an outbreak.
3. A sudden or dramatic improvement or increase in popularity: "Now grown on a small scale in several arid regions, this crop seems poised for a major breakout" (Noel Vietmeyer).
4. A breakdown of statistical data.
5. Sports A play, as in hockey, in which the defending team moves the puck out of its defensive zone, especially by passing, to begin an offensive play.
adj.
1. Characterized by a sudden significant improvement or increase in popularity: a ballplayer having a breakout season; a band with a breakout album.
2. Conducted separately from a larger group or meeting: attended several breakout sessions at the conference.

break•out

(ˈbreɪkˌaʊt)

n.
1. an escape, often by force, as from a prison.
2. a sudden, often widespread appearance or occurrence, as of a disease; outbreak.
3. an itemization; breakdown.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breakout - an escape from jailbreakout - an escape from jail; "the breakout was carefully planned"
escape, flight - the act of escaping physically; "he made his escape from the mental hospital"; "the canary escaped from its cage"; "his flight was an indication of his guilt"

breakout

noun
The act or an instance of escaping, as from confinement or difficulty:
Slang: lam.
Translations
pako

breakout

break-out [ˈbreɪkaʊt] n (= escape) → évasion fbreak point n (tennis)balle f de break

break

(breik) past tense broke (brouk) : past participle brəken (ˈbroukən) verb
1. to divide into two or more parts (by force).
2. (usually with off/away) to separate (a part) from the whole (by force).
3. to make or become unusable.
4. to go against, or not act according to (the law etc). He broke his appointment at the last minute.
5. to do better than (a sporting etc record).
6. to interrupt. She broke her journey in London.
7. to put an end to. He broke the silence.
8. to make or become known. They gently broke the news of his death to his wife.
9. (of a boy's voice) to fall in pitch.
10. to soften the effect of (a fall, the force of the wind etc).
11. to begin. The storm broke before they reached shelter.
noun
1. a pause. a break in the conversation.
2. a change. a break in the weather.
3. an opening.
4. a chance or piece of (good or bad) luck. This is your big break.
ˈbreakable adjective
(negative unbreakable) likely to break. breakable toys.
noun
(usually in plural) something likely to break.
ˈbreakage (-kidʒ) noun
the act of breaking, or its result(s).
ˈbreaker noun
a (large) wave which breaks on rocks or the beach.
ˈbreakdown noun
1. (often nervous breakdown) a mental collapse.
2. a mechanical failure causing a stop. The car has had another breakdown. See also break down.
break-inbreak in(to)ˈbreakneck adjective
(usually of speed) dangerous. He drove at breakneck speed.
breakoutbreak outˈbreakthrough noun
a sudden solution of a problem leading to further advances, especially in science.
ˈbreakwater noun
a barrier to break the force of the waves.
break away
to escape from control. The dog broke away from its owner.
break down
1. to use force on (a door etc) to cause it to open.
2. to stop working properly. My car has broken down.
3. to fail. The talks have broken down.
4. to be overcome with emotion. She broke down and wept.
break in(to)
1. to enter (a house etc) by force or unexpectedly (noun ˈbreak-in. The Smiths have had two break-ins recently).
2. to interrupt (someone's conversation etc).
break loose
to escape from control. The dog has broken loose.
break off
to stop. She broke off in the middle of a sentence.
break out
1. to appear or happen suddenly. War has broken out.
2. to escape (from prison, restrictions etc). A prisoner has broken out (noun ˈbreakout).
break out in
to (suddenly) become covered in a rash, in sweat etc. I'm allergic to strawberries. They make me break out in a rash.
break the ice
to overcome the first shyness etc. Let's break the ice by inviting our new neighbours for a meal.
break up
1. to divide, separate or break into pieces. He broke up the old furniture and burnt it; John and Mary broke up (= separated from each other) last week.
2. to finish or end. The meeting broke up at 4.40.
make a break for it
to make an (attempt to) escape. When the guard is not looking, make a break for it.

breakout

n. erupción.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on such realistic assumptions, Iran's breakout time under the pending deal actually would be around three months, while its current breakout time is a little under two months.
He added, "Here's the thing about the conversation focusing so much on breakout time [or how to maximize the amount of time it would take Iran to enrich one bomb's worth of uranium].
Breakout makes women and urban youth feel independent, powerful and stand out from rest of the crowd.
Al-Maliki made the decision following a meeting with the security committee on the breakout, his office said in a statement.
Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research Activity in the US - Sales of Commercial Products and Services in Stem Cell/Regenerative Medicine Sectors - Breakout of Spending by Companies in the Cellular Therapy/Regenerative Medicine Space - Breakout of Spending by Product Platforms in Various Spaces - Autologous vs.
HSCTs Performed in the EU: Percent Breakout by Disease Classes Addressed
Breakout sessions (multiple 1-hour and 2-hour sessions will be offered)
US Dollar Consolidation Bound to Yield Breakout This Week Euro Forecast Dims on S&P 500 September Effect Japanese Yen Crosses Ready for the Next Trend in Risk Appetite British Pound Outlook Bearish on Technical Break Lower Swiss Franc Will Follow Risk Trends to Breakout or Reversal Canadian Dollar Appears Range Bound As GDP and Unemployment Offset Australian Dollar: RBA to Hold Interest Rate, 2Q GDP on Tap New Zealand Dollar to Look Past Data, Trade on Risk Trends
Breakout in Style is an innovative concept bringing together conferencing, hospitality and activity package owned and managed by the hotel.
Conference Aston, the leading Birmingham city-based academic conference facility in the heart of the Midlands, noted the growing need for good quality breakout areas in conference facilities and has a range of areas available specifically targeted to meet the needs of both delegates and conference leaders.
The second floor consists of an information desk staffed by a librarian to assist students, an internet lounge, and a service desk where students can go for support, reserve breakout rooms, and rent loaner laptops.
Relocates policy on component breakout from DFARS Appendix D to DFARS Part 207; and relocates procedures for component breakout from DFARS Appendix D to PGI.