breast-fed


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.breast-fed - (of an infant) fed milk from the mother's breast
bottle-fed - (of an infant) given milk from a bottle
Translations

breast-fed

[ˈbrestfed] ADJcriado a pecho

breast-fed

[ˈbrɛstˌfɛd] adjallattato/a al seno
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies have shown that babies who are breast-fed are less likely to be obese in later life and gain protection against conditions like asthma, eczema and chest infections.
The average CPTSD-RI score was 18 among those who had been breast-fed (corresponding to "mild" PTSD according to standard interpretations of this measure) and 25 among children who had not been breast-fed (corresponding to "moderate" PTSD).
Experts say the only reason breast-fed babies are brighter is because their mums are clever.
The United Nations Children's Fund said the previous record was held by the City of Berkeley, California, where 1,135 mothers simultaneous breast-fed babies for a minute on Aug.
Breast-fed children, however, when compared to formula-fed children, had an advantage in terms of quality of movements, fluency, and cognitive development tests at 18 and 42 months of age and at 6 years of age, despite a higher PCB exposure from breast milk.
A GROUP dedicated to helping new mums is looking for women who have breast-fed their children.
Margarite Wierma, who is organising the Sure Start project in Ely, said: 'About three generations of knowledge of breast-feeding have been lost from when mums naturally breast-fed their children.
Beyond the vital bonding experience breast-feeding provides, the health benefits are encouraging: Reduced illness and infections, plus increased life expectancy among breast-fed babies.
The list of benefits for breast-fed babies includes everything from a raised IQ to a stronger immune system to less obesity later in life.
Other cultural barriers that make women think their babies cannot be breast-fed must also be broken.
Further research needs to be conducted to learn how, if at all, silicone could affect children who have been breast-fed by mothers with breast implants.
The study described in The Lancet article, was designed to evaluate the neurological development of full-term breast-fed infants versus formula-fed infants born between 1975 and 1979.