breast-fed


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.breast-fed - (of an infant) fed milk from the mother's breast
bottle-fed - (of an infant) given milk from a bottle
Translations

breast-fed

[ˈbrestfed] ADJcriado a pecho

breast-fed

[ˈbrɛstˌfɛd] adjallattato/a al seno
References in periodicals archive ?
Eighty-five percent of women in this comparison group breast-fed their infants, more than double the proportion among PBB-exposed women in Michigan and more than double the proportion among U.
According to those numbers, if women in developed countries were to have families as large as women did in the 1800s and breast-fed babies as long, breast cancer risk by age 70 would be less than half of what it is today, say the researchers.
Breast-fed babies could be at increased risk of heart disease in later life, according to research published today.
In 1998, the percentage of African-American mothers who breast-fed during the early postpartum period (45 percent), at six months (19 percent) and at one year (9 percent) was ``alarmingly low,'' Satcher said in his introduction to the blueprint.
Experts say breast-fed babies suffer fewer digestive upsets and get extra immunity against illness.
For years, we've followed the World Health Organization guideline that where possible babies should be breast-fed for six months.
Sixty-four percent of the women had a primary education or less, and 60% had had more than one child; 56% had breast-fed previously.
There was no difference in the number of cesarean sections between cases and controls, and having a C-section did not affect the percentage of women who ever breast-fed in either group.
The guidelines recommend that breast-fed infants receive supplemental vitamin D, starting in the first 2 months of life.
In that prospective, longitudinal, birth cohort study involving 3,253 participants, the cognitive development of adults who as infants were breast-fed alone or in combination with commercial formula for 7-9 months surpassed that of adults who were breast-fed for less than 7 months, said Erik Lykke Mortensen, Ph.
A computer program linking physiologically based pharmacokinetic model with cancer risk assessment for breast-fed infants.
Thirty of the infants were held and breast-fed while their heels were stuck; the other 30 were swaddled (wrapped in a blanket) in their bassinets during the procedure.