breeches


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breech

 (brēch)
n.
1. The lower rear portion of the human trunk; the buttocks.
2.
a. A breech presentation or delivery.
b. A fetus in breech presentation.
3. breeches
a. Knee breeches.
b. Informal Pants.
c. Tight-fitting pants for horseback riding, often including a wide layer of coarse material such as leather centered along the inseam to provide improved grip.
4. The part of a firearm behind the barrel.
5. The lower part of a pulley block.

[Middle English brech, from Old English brēc, pl. of brōc, leg covering, Gaulish brāca, hose, trousers.]

breeches

(ˈbrɪtʃɪz; ˈbriː-)
pl n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) trousers extending to the knee or just below, worn for riding, mountaineering, etc
2. (Clothing & Fashion) informal or dialect any trousers
3. too big for one's breeches conceited; unduly self-confident

breech•es

(ˈbrɪtʃ ɪz)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
1. knee-length trousers, often with buckles or decoration at the bottoms, worn by men in the 17th to early 19th centuries.
3. Informal. trousers.
Idioms:
too big for one's breeches, more insolent and conceited than is warranted by one's position or abilities.
[1125–75; Middle English, pl. of breech]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.breeches - trousers ending above the kneebreeches - trousers ending above the knee  
britches - informal term for breeches
buckskins - breeches made of buckskin
codpiece - (15th-16th century) a flap for the crotch of men's tight-fitting breeches
plus fours - men's baggy knickers hanging below the knees; formerly worn for sports (especially golf)
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
trunk hose - puffed breeches of the 16th and 17th centuries usually worn over hose
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
سروال، بنطلون بريتشيز
kraťasy
=-bukserknæbukser
buxur; reiîbuxur
bridžiaikelnės
bikses līdz ceļiem

breeches

[ˈbriːtʃɪz]
A. NPLcalzones mpl
riding breechespantalones mpl de montar
to wear the breechesllevar los pantalones or calzones
B. CPD breeches buoy N (Naut) → boya f pantalón

breeches

[ˈbrɪtʃɪz ˈbriːtʃɪz] npl (old-fashioned)culotte f

breeches

plKniehose f; (= riding breeches)Reithose f; (for hiking) → (Knie)bundhose f

breeches

[ˈbrɪtʃɪz] npl (knee breeches) → calzoni mpl alla zuava; (riding breeches) → pantaloni mpl da cavallo

breeches

(ˈbritʃiz) , ((American) ˈbri:-) noun plural
trousers, especially ones coming just below the knee. riding breeches.
References in classic literature ?
The disposition of these vast sums by gentlemen wearing patched breeches awakened no sense of the ludicrous, nor did any doubt, reservation, or contingency enter into the plans of the charming enthusiasts themselves.
As Alice came into the room, her eyes fell upon the carpenter, who was standing near its centre, clad in green woollen jacket, a pair of loose breeches, open at the knees, and with a long pocket for his rule, the end of which protruded; it was as proper a mark of the artisan's calling as Mr.
It was toward evening that Ichabod arrived at the castle of the Heer Van Tassel, which he found thronged with the pride and flower of the adjacent country Old farmers, a spare leathern- faced race, in homespun coats and breeches, blue stockings, huge shoes, and magnificent pewter buckles.
Two footmen were standing ready, dressed in drab livery, with scarlet breeches and white stockings.
Yes, and the very colors in them loud countrified Sunday clothes--plaid breeches, green and black--"
The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance, and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in knee- breeches and gaiters.
The wine-shop was a corner shop, better than most others in its appearance and degree, and the master of the wine-shop had stood outside it, in a yellow waistcoat and green breeches, looking on at the struggle for the lost wine.
It was a habit with Scrooge, whenever he became thoughtful, to put his hands in his breeches pockets.
In breeches and gaiters, broad-brimmed hat, grey coat, speckled choker,' said the waiter.
This doublet hung unbuttoned over a close dress of scarlet which sate tight to his body; he had breeches of the same, but they did not reach below the lower part of the thigh, leaving the knee exposed.
Several times we shipped a little water, and my breeches and the tails of my coat were all soaking wet before we had gone a hundred yards.
In the large pocket, on the right side of his middle cover" (so I translate the word RANFULO, by which they meant my breeches,) "we saw a hollow pillar of iron, about the length of a man, fastened to a strong piece of timber larger than the pillar; and upon one side of the pillar, were huge pieces of iron sticking out, cut into strange figures, which we know not what to make of.