breechloading

breech·load·ing

 (brēch′lō′dĭng)
adj.
Designed to be loaded at the breech. Used of a gun or other firearm.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jones Improvement The rifle we're reviewing is typical of the early style of blackpowder, breechloading centerfires.
Ned Robert's and Ken Water's book, The Breechloading Singleshot Rifle has information on this.
Dr Roads, who is the president of the Historical Breechloading Small Arms Association of the UK, and a Home Office advisor on historical small arms, designed and executed the Bait ar Rudaydah displays between 2005 and 2009 and now, as managing director of Historic Arms, Exhibitions and Forts, is completing them.
That vision came to fruition last year when Reece Group officially moved into the former Vickers and BAE factory where the first breechloading gun was made for the war in Crimea as well as parts for Spitfires and the 'bouncing bombs' used by the Dambusters.
These included percussion smoothbore and rifled muskets and the second breechloading long arm to see service with the U.
Light, short, fast firing and accurate, the breechloading, cavalry carbines signaled the coming end of the single-shot muzzleloader era.
The historical significance of new weapons in the relentless slaughter is also well documented: "As adaptable as grizzlies are, their defenses did not increase as new weapons were developed for use against them--strychnine, whaling guns, pendulum traps, liquor-laced bait (and finally) when the powerful breechloading 'bone-smasher' rifles were invented, the contest was over.
I have also taken pheasants and other birds as far away from the muzzle with my 12-gauge double as with most breechloading guns I've used.
While numbers and training were important, breechloading rifles and rifled cannon were considered valuable force multipliers, with a potential to bring about prompt decisions in Prussia's favor.
1775, that Pattie embarked upon designing the Ferguson Rifle, a modification of Chaumette and Bidet's breechloading system for military use.
With the advent of breechloading firearms, self-contained cartridges, and the Civil War, the demand for Deringer pistols and other percussion weapons declined sharply.
Other replicas include the Smith Carbine, a Civil War breechloading carbine, and the Ithaca Hawken.