bribee

bribee

(ˌbraɪˈbiː)
n
a person who accepts a bribe
References in periodicals archive ?
a briber pays, but the bribee fails to deliver due to the weakening political power of corrupt officials).
But he also expounded on the dynamics of corruption, the bribee and the briber, the latter being the former's necessary partner.
First, in some of the most infamous cases of bribery, a briber is caught on tape offering or giving a bribee a briefcase full of cash in return for some official act.
Despite using the term "passive" to refer to the conduct of the bribee, neither side is truly passive since both the briber and bribee must agree before a bribe can occur.
1120, 1121 (2009) ("A bribe is the payment by a briber of something of value to the bribee in exchange for the bribee acting both in the briber's interest and contrary to the bribee's own duties.
In partial contrast to the political focus on power, discretion, and accountability, the economic theory of corruption locates the main determinants at the level of available benefits, the risk of corrupt deals, and the relative bargaining power of briber and bribee.
This is particularly likely to be true for corrupt behavior where there are no impartial observers, and the only witnesses to the breaking of rules are the briber and the bribee.
There is also a risk that competitive pressures may actually increase theft from the government (or, corruption with theft in which neither the briber nor the bribee has an incentive to report the corrupt transaction).
On the bribee side, corruption can "hold back state reform" (p.
23) For them "[b]ribery occurs when one person (the briber) provides an inducement to another person (the bribee) that is intended to be in exchange for the bribee doing, or not doing, something that would favor the briber and be contrary to the bribee's positional duty.
A bribee doesn't exist without a briber I think, it's very clear-'yung nakikiuusap.