bridging


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bridge 1

 (brĭj)
n.
1. A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway.
2. Something resembling or analogous to this structure in form or function: a land bridge between the continents; a bridge of understanding between two countries.
3.
a. The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
b. The part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests against this ridge.
4. A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
5. Music
a. A thin, upright piece of wood in some stringed instruments that supports the strings above the soundboard.
b. A transitional passage connecting two subjects or movements.
6. Nautical A crosswise platform or enclosed area above the main deck of a ship from which the ship is controlled.
7. Games
a. A long stick with a notched plate at one end, used to steady the cue in billiards. Also called rest1.
b. The hand used as a support to steady the cue.
8. Electricity
a. Any of various instruments for measuring or comparing the characteristics, such as impedance or inductance, of a conductor.
b. An electrical shunt.
9. Chemistry An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.
tr.v. bridged, bridg·ing, bridg·es
1. To build a bridge over.
2. To cross by or as if by a bridge.

[Middle English brigge, from Old English brycg; see bhrū- in Indo-European roots.]

bridge′a·ble adj.

bridge 2

 (brĭj)
n.
Any of several card games derived from whist, usually played by four people in two partnerships, in which trump is determined by bidding and the hand opposite the declarer is played as a dummy.

[From earlier biritch (influenced by bridge), from Russian birich, a call, from Old Russian birichĭ.]

bridging

(ˈbrɪdʒɪŋ)
n
1. (Building) one or more timber struts fixed between floor or roof joists to stiffen the construction and distribute the loads
2. (Mountaineering) mountaineering a technique for climbing a wide chimney by pressing left hand and foot against one side of it and right hand and foot against the other side
3. (Rugby) rugby union an illegal move in which a player leans down and forward onto the body of a prone player in a ruck, thereby preventing opposing players from winning the ball by fair rucking
References in classic literature ?
I know not how significant it is, or how far it is an evidence of singularity, that an individual should thus consent in his pettiest walk with the general movement of the race; but I know that something akin to the migratory instinct in birds and quadrupeds--which, in some instances, is known to have affected the squirrel tribe, impelling them to a general and mysterious movement, in which they were seen, say some, crossing the broadest rivers, each on its particular chip, with its tail raised for a sail, and bridging narrower streams with their dead--that something like the furor which affects the domestic cattle in the spring, and which is referred to a worm in their tails,--affects both nations and individuals, either perennially or from time to time.
Another man started up; the bridging bough was detected, and a volunteer started up the tree that furnished the bridge.
So, if great things to small may be compar'd, XERXES, the Libertie of GREECE to yoke, From SUSA his MEMNONIAN Palace high Came to the Sea, and over HELLESPONT Bridging his way, EUROPE with ASIA joyn'd, And scourg'd with many a stroak th' indignant waves.
The great and terrible wave gathered about Achilles, falling upon him and beating on his shield, so that he could not keep his feet; he caught hold of a great elm-tree, but it came up by the roots, and tore away the bank, damming the stream with its thick branches and bridging it all across; whereby Achilles struggled out of the stream, and fled full speed over the plain, for he was afraid.
No human ingenuity could suggest a means of bridging the chasm which yawned between ourselves and our past lives.
She had laid up her treasures on earth only; she had lived solely for the little things of life -- the things that pass -- forgetting the great things that go onward into eternity, bridging the gulf between the two lives and making of death a mere passing from one dwelling to the other -- from twilight to unclouded day.