brier


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bri·er 1

also bri·ar  (brī′ər)
n.
Any of several prickly plants, such as certain rosebushes or the greenbrier.

[Middle English brer, from Old English brēr.]

bri′er·y adj.

bri·er 2

 (brī′ər)
n.
Variant of briar1.

brier

(ˈbraɪə) or

briar

n
(Plants) any of various thorny shrubs or other plants, such as the sweetbrier and greenbrier
[Old English brēr, brǣr, of obscure origin]
ˈbriery, ˈbriary adj

brier

(ˈbraɪə)
n
(Plants) a variant spelling of briar1

bri•er1

or bri•ar

(ˈbraɪ ər)

n.
1. a prickly plant or shrub, esp. the sweetbrier or a catbrier.
2. a tangled mass of prickly plants.
3. a thorny stem or twig.
[before 1000; Middle English brer]
bri′er•y, adj.

bri•er2

or bri•ar

(ˈbraɪ ər)

n.
1. the white heath, Erica arborea, of France and Corsica, the woody root of which is used for making tobacco pipes.
2. a pipe made of brierroot.
[1865–70; earlier bruyer < French bruyère, Old French < Gallo-Latin *brūcāria, derivative of *brūc- heather]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brier - tangled mass of prickly plants
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
2.brier - a thorny stem or twig
branchlet, sprig, twig - a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
3.brier - Eurasian rose with prickly stems and fragrant leaves and bright pink flowers followed by scarlet hipsbrier - Eurasian rose with prickly stems and fragrant leaves and bright pink flowers followed by scarlet hips
rose, rosebush - any of many shrubs of the genus Rosa that bear roses
4.brier - a very prickly woody vine of the eastern United States growing in tangled masses having tough round stems with shiny leathery leaves and small greenish flowers followed by clusters of inedible shiny black berriesbrier - a very prickly woody vine of the eastern United States growing in tangled masses having tough round stems with shiny leathery leaves and small greenish flowers followed by clusters of inedible shiny black berries
genus Smilax, Smilax - sometimes placed in Smilacaceae
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
5.brier - evergreen treelike Mediterranean shrub having fragrant white flowers in large terminal panicles and hard woody roots used to make tobacco pipesbrier - evergreen treelike Mediterranean shrub having fragrant white flowers in large terminal panicles and hard woody roots used to make tobacco pipes
erica, true heath - any plant of the genus Erica
briarroot - hard woody root of the briar Erica arborea
Translations

brier

n
(= wild rose)wilde Rose; (= bramble runner)Ranke f; (= thorny bush)Dornbusch m
= briar a
References in classic literature ?
The Ross of Mull, which I had now got upon, was rugged and trackless, like the isle I had just left; being all bog, and brier, and big stone.
He scrambled over rock and stone, through brush and brier, rolled down banks like a hedgehog, scrambled up others like a catamount.
The other agreed, and they cut down two willow wands of a summer's growth that grew beneath a brier, and set them up at a distance of threescore yards.
He darted onward--straight, headlong--dashing through brier and brake, and leaping gate and fence as madly as his dog, who careered with loud and sounding bark before him.
A mild pale moon rose behind the declivities of the coast, streaking at first the undulating ripples of the sea, which appeared to have calmed after the roaring it had sent forth during the vision of Athos - the moon, we say, shed its diamonds and opals upon the briers and bushes of the hills.
The Victoria thus passed over the country of the Tibbous, crossed the Belad el Djerid, a desert of briers that forms the border of the Soudan, and advanced into the desert of sand streaked with the long tracks of the many caravans that pass and repass there.
He still wore the fine broadcloth suit in which he had fulfilled his mission, but it was bitterly the worse for wear, daubed with clay and torn with the sharp briers of the wood.
He did not use care to avoid trees and branches, and his forgotten feet were constantly knocking against stones or getting entangled in briers.
We dwell but on the roses by the wayside, and the strong briers that stung us are, to our distant eyes, but gentle tendrils waving in the wind.
Little recked he of thorns and briers that scratched his flesh and tore his clothing, for all he thought of was to get, by the shortest way, to the greenwood glade whence he knew the sound of the bugle horn came.
One crawled through tight-locked briers and branches, and found oneself on the very edge, peering out and down through a green screen.
But then the dawn of bitter recollection that succeeded - the waking to find life a blank, and worse than a blank, teeming with torment and misery - not a mere barren wilderness, but full of thorns and briers - to find myself deceived, duped, hopeless, my affections trampled upon, my angel not an angel, and my friend a fiend incarnate - it was worse than if I had not slept at all.