brig


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brig

 (brĭg)
n.
1. A two-masted sailing vessel, square-rigged on both masts.
2. A jail or prison on board a US Navy or Coast Guard vessel.
3. A jail or guardhouse, especially on the premises of a US military installation.

[Short for brigantine. Senses 2 and 3, from the use of ships as prisons.]

brig

(brɪɡ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical a two-masted square-rigger
2. (Military) chiefly US a prison, esp in a navy ship
[C18: shortened from brigantine]

brig

(brɪɡ)
n
a Scot and northern English word for a bridge1

brig

(brɪg)

n.
1.
a. a two-masted vessel square-rigged on both masts.
b. the compartment of a ship where prisoners are confined.
2. a military prison; guardhouse.
[1705–15; short for brigantine]

Brig.

1. brigade.
2. brigadier.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brig - two-masted sailing vessel square-rigged on both mastsbrig - two-masted sailing vessel square-rigged on both masts
sailing ship, sailing vessel - a vessel that is powered by the wind; often having several masts
2.brig - a penal institution (especially on board a ship)
penal facility, penal institution - an institution where persons are confined for punishment and to protect the public
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight

brig

noun
A place for the confinement of persons in lawful detention:
Informal: lockup, pen.
Chiefly Regional: calaboose.
Translations
priki
brigbrik
bryg

brig

[brɪg] N (Naut) → bergantín m

brig

[ˈbrɪg] n
(= ship) → brick m
(US) (= prison) → galère f

brig

n
(= ship)Brigg f
(US: = cell on ship) → Arrestzelle f (auf einem Schiff); (Mil sl) → Bunker m (sl)
References in classic literature ?
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
And on the third day I was picked up by a brig from Apia to San Francisco.
Go to the riverside, ask for the brig SUND, and give this letter to the captain; he will convey you to a little port, where certainly you are not expected, and which is ordinarily only frequented by fishermen.
There they found a brig ready to set sail, upon the deck of which they recognized Mordaunt walking up and down impatiently.
A brig, the May Dacres, had been dispatched for the Columbia with supplies; and he was now on his way to the same point, at the head of sixty men, whom he had enlisted at St.
Ultimately they brought us up with the jibboom of a Dutch brig poking through our spanker - nothing worse.
He had received information, also, that an armed brig from Halifax, probably at the instigation of the Northwest Company, was hovering on the coast, watching for the Tonquin, with the purpose of impressing the Canadians on board of her, as British subjects, and thus interrupting the voyage.
And while he discussed within his own mind what sort of shape or similitude it were well to bestow upon this excellent piece of timber, there came into Drowne's workshop a certain Captain Hunnewell, owner and commander of the good brig called the Cynosure, which had just returned from her first voyage to Fayal.
Miss Bordereau sailed with her family on a tossing brig, in the days of long voyages and sharp differences; she had her emotions on the top of yellow diligences, passed the night at inns where she dreamed of travelers' tales, and was struck, on reaching the Eternal City, with the elegance of Roman pearls and scarfs.
Next day we were picked up by the brig Hotspur, bound for Australia, whose captain found no difficulty in believing that we were the survivors of a passenger ship which had foundered.
Aboard the brig Eliza, Liverpool, homeward bound; glad to see them eyes open.
From a large brig lying near also came the music of the sailors as they worked at getting the anchor up in order to be ready for the wind.