brigand


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brig·and

 (brĭg′ənd)
n.
A robber or bandit, especially one of an outlaw band.

[Middle English brigaunt, from Old French, from Old Italian brigante, skirmisher, from present participle of brigare, to fight; see brigade.]

brig′and·age (-ən-dĭj), brig′and·ism n.

brigand

(ˈbrɪɡənd)
n
(Professions) a bandit or plunderer, esp a member of a gang operating in mountainous areas
[C14: from Old French, from Old Italian brigante fighter, from brigare to fight, from briga strife, of Celtic origin]
ˈbrigandage, ˈbrigandry n

brig•and

(ˈbrɪg ənd)

n.
a bandit.
[1350–1400; Middle English briga(u)nt < Middle French brigand < early Italian brigante member of an armed company]
brig′and•age, n.
brig′and•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a bandbrigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

brigand

noun bandit, outlaw, robber, gangster, plunderer, highwayman, desperado, marauder, ruffian, freebooter, footpad (archaic) He looked like a scruffy brigand.
Translations
zbojník
rosvo
לסטיםשודד
briganti

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] Nbandido m, bandolero m

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] n (literary) (= bandit) → bandit m

brigand

n (old)Räuber m, → Bandit m

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] nbandito, brigante m
References in classic literature ?
If I knew which rascal threw at the carriage, and if that brigand were sufficiently near it, he should be crushed under the wheels.
The cardinal sets a spy upon a gentleman, has his letters stolen from him by means of a traitor, a brigand, a rascal-has, with the help of this spy and thanks to this correspondence, Chalais's throat cut, under the stupid pretext that he wanted to kill the king and marry Monsieur to the queen
I almost hesitated, though," replied the sailor; "you looked more like a brigand than an honest man, with your beard six inches, and your hair a foot long.
Remorselessly to rob you, an orphan, as any brigand might do?
The brigand captain took the large paper from the attendant brigand and, glancing over it, continued: "My other intentions are clearly set forth in this public document, which I will hand round in a moment; and which after that will be posted on a tree by every village in the valley, and every cross-road in the hills.
He was delighted with himself: he looked every inch a brigand.
Thereupon the brigand offers to go along with her, and she accepts his offer.
It was that plotting governess with the trick of a "perfect lady" manner (severely conventional) and the soul of a remorseless brigand.
Grewgious held decidedly to the general principle, that if you could steal a march upon a brigand or a wild beast, you had better do it; and he also held decidedly to the special case, that John Jasper was a brigand and a wild beast in combination.
So decidedly are amiability and mildness their characteristics, that I confess I look upon that youth who distinguished himself by the slaughter of these inoffensive persons, as a false-hearted brigand, who, pretending to philanthropic motives, was secretly influenced only by the wealth stored up within their castles, and the hope of plunder.
If I had been born a corsair or a pirate, a brigand, genteel highwayman or patriot--and they're the same thing,' thought Mr Tappertit, musing among the nine-pins, 'I should have been all right.
He jerked his great cloak more heavily upon him by an impatient movement of one shoulder, and growled, 'To the devil with this Brigand of a Sun that never shines in here