brigand

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brig·and

 (brĭg′ənd)
n.
A robber or bandit, especially one of an outlaw band.

[Middle English brigaunt, from Old French, from Old Italian brigante, skirmisher, from present participle of brigare, to fight; see brigade.]

brig′and·age (-ən-dĭj), brig′and·ism n.

brigand

(ˈbrɪɡənd)
n
(Professions) a bandit or plunderer, esp a member of a gang operating in mountainous areas
[C14: from Old French, from Old Italian brigante fighter, from brigare to fight, from briga strife, of Celtic origin]
ˈbrigandage, ˈbrigandry n

brig•and

(ˈbrɪg ənd)

n.
a bandit.
[1350–1400; Middle English briga(u)nt < Middle French brigand < early Italian brigante member of an armed company]
brig′and•age, n.
brig′and•ish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a bandbrigand - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

brigand

noun bandit, outlaw, robber, gangster, plunderer, highwayman, desperado, marauder, ruffian, freebooter, footpad (archaic) He looked like a scruffy brigand.
Translations
zbojník
rosvo
לסטיםשודד
briganti

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] Nbandido m, bandolero m

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] n (literary) (= bandit) → bandit m

brigand

n (old)Räuber m, → Bandit m

brigand

[ˈbrɪgənd] nbandito, brigante m
References in periodicals archive ?
What then is the way out of the modern day brigandry that has enveloped many families of today?
He expressed optimism that the law would lead to a peaceful regime in the Bangsamoro, hoping that this would shun away those who are espousing secession or rebellion or brigandry.
In the reign of Sri Jayaccandradeva, in the year equal to the rays [12] of the fire [3] in the sky [0], 1230, on Wednesday, in the dark half of the month of Asvina, on the twelfth (12th), in Lahadapura, this statute (sthiti) is drawn up by the Dvijas, [as] an agreement (samvid) made by those who gathered, having been tormented by brigandry (vatutumta, i.
41-59), explores the role of the brigand ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) and brigandry ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), focusing predominantly on Xenophon Ephesius and Heliodorus, but with passing references to other Greek and Roman novels.