bring down


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to bring down: bring down the house

bring

 (brĭng)
tr.v. brought (brôt), bring·ing, brings
1. To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place: brought enough money with me.
2. To carry as an attribute or contribution: You bring many years of experience to your new post.
3. To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location: bring the water to a boil; brought the meeting to a close.
4.
a. To persuade; induce: The defendant's testimony brought others to confess.
b. To get the attention of; attract: Smoke and flames brought the neighbors.
5.
a. To cause to occur as a consequence: Floods brought destruction to the valley.
b. To cause to occur as a concomitant: For many, the fall brings hay fever.
6. To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall: This music brings back memories.
7. To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
8. To be sold for: a portrait that brought a million dollars.
Phrasal Verbs:
bring about
1. To cause (something) to happen: a speech that brought about a change in public opinion.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship or boat) to head in a different direction.
bring around (or round)
1. To cause to adopt an opinion or take a certain course of action.
2. To cause to recover consciousness.
bring down
1. To cause to fall or collapse: a shot that brought down a bird; a demolition crew that brought down a building.
2. To force to the ground, as by tackling.
3. To cause to lose power or leave office: The scandal brought down the prime minister.
4. To kill.
5. To disappoint or dispirit: The cancellation of the ballgame brought us down.
bring forth
1. To give rise to; produce: plants bringing forth fruit.
2. To give birth to (young).
bring forward
1. To present; produce: bring forward proof.
2. Accounting To carry (a sum) from one page or column to another.
bring in
1. Law To give or submit (a verdict) to a court.
2. To produce, yield, or earn (profits or income).
bring off
To accomplish: bring off a successful advertising campaign.
bring on
To cause to appear: brought on the dessert.
bring out
1.
a. To reveal or expose: brought out the facts.
b. To introduce (a debutante) to society.
2. To produce or publish: bring out a new book.
3. To nurture and develop (a quality, for example) to best advantage: You bring out the best in me.
bring to
1. To cause to recover consciousness.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship) to turn into the wind or come to a stop.
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child); rear.
2. To introduce into discussion; mention.
3. To vomit.
4. To cause to come to a sudden stop.
Idioms:
bring down the house
To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
bring home
To make perfectly clear: a lecture that brought home several important points.
bring home the bacon
1. To earn a living, especially for a family.
2. To achieve desired results; have success.
bring to bear
1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
bring to light
To reveal or disclose: brought the real facts to light.
bring to (one's) knees
To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
bring to terms
To force (another) to agree.
bring up the rear
To be the last in a line or sequence.

[Middle English bringen, from Old English bringan; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bring′er n.
Usage Note: The difference between bring and take is one of perspective. Bring indicates motion toward the place from which the action is regarded—typically toward the speaker—while take indicates motion away from the place from which the action is regarded—typically away from the speaker. Thus from a customer's perspective, the customer takes checks to the bank and brings home cash, while from the banker's perspective the customer brings checks to the bank in order to take away cash. When the point of reference is not the place of speaking itself, either verb is possible, but the correct choice still depends on the desired perspective. For example, The labor leaders brought their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the mayor's office, while The labor leaders took their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the labor leaders. Be aware that the choice of bring or take determines the point of view emphasized. For example, a parent sitting at home may say of a child, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school, describing the situation from the child's viewpoint leaving school. If the viewpoint shifts to the speaker, bring becomes appropriate, as in Look, I see her coming right now, and she's bringing a whole armful of books!

bring down

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to cause to fall: the fighter aircraft brought the enemy down; the ministers agreed to bring down the price of oil.
2. (usually passive) slang to cause to be elated and then suddenly depressed, as from using drugs
n
dialect US a disappointment
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bring down - move something or somebody to a lower position; "take down the vase from the shelf"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
reef - lower and bring partially inboard; "reef the sailboat's mast"
depress - lower (prices or markets); "The glut of oil depressed gas prices"
dip - lower briefly; "She dipped her knee"
incline - lower or bend (the head or upper body), as in a nod or bow; "She inclined her head to the student"
2.bring down - cause the downfall of; of rulers; "The Czar was overthrown"; "subvert the ruling class"
revolutionize - overthrow by a revolution, of governments
depose, force out - force to leave (an office)
3.bring down - impose something unpleasantbring down - impose something unpleasant; "The principal visited his rage on the students"
communicate, intercommunicate - transmit thoughts or feelings; "He communicated his anxieties to the psychiatrist"
dictate, prescribe, order - issue commands or orders for
obtrude, intrude - thrust oneself in as if by force; "The colors don't intrude on the viewer"
clamp - impose or inflict forcefully; "The military government clamped a curfew onto the capital"
give - inflict as a punishment; "She gave the boy a good spanking"; "The judge gave me 10 years"
foist - to force onto another; "He foisted his work on me"
4.bring down - cause to come to the ground; "the pilot managed to land the airplane safely"
air travel, aviation, air - travel via aircraft; "air travel involves too much waiting in airports"; "if you've time to spare go by air"
arrive, come, get - reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight"
5.bring down - cause to be enthusiastic; "Her playing brought down the house"
enthuse - cause to feel enthusiasm
6.bring down - cut down onbring down - cut down on; make a reduction in; "reduce your daily fat intake"; "The employer wants to cut back health benefits"
shorten - make shorter than originally intended; reduce or retrench in length or duration; "He shortened his trip due to illness"
spill - reduce the pressure of wind on (a sail)
quench - reduce the degree of (luminescence or phosphorescence) in (excited molecules or a material) by adding a suitable substance
cut - have a reducing effect; "This cuts into my earnings"
retrench - make a reduction, as in one's workforce; "The company had to retrench"
slash - cut drastically; "Prices were slashed"
thin out - make sparse; "thin out the young plants"
thin - make thin or thinner; "Thin the solution"
minify, decrease, lessen - make smaller; "He decreased his staff"
detract, take away - take away a part from; diminish; "His bad manners detract from his good character"
deflate - reduce or cut back the amount or availability of, creating a decline in value or prices; "deflate the currency"
inflate - increase the amount or availability of, creating a rise in value; "inflate the currency"
downsize - reduce in size or number; "the company downsized its research staff"
subtract - take off or away; "this prefix was subtracted when the word was borrowed from French"
knock off, shave - cut the price of

bring

verb
1. To cause to come along with oneself:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
4. To achieve (a certain price).Also used with in:
phrasal verb
bring aboutphrasal verb
bring around or round
1. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
2. To cause to come back to life or consciousness:
phrasal verb
bring down
1. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
2. To bring about the downfall of:
phrasal verb
bring forth
To give birth to:
Chiefly Regional: birth.
Idiom: be brought abed of.
phrasal verb
bring in
To make as income or profit:
phrasal verb
bring off
To bring about and carry to a successful conclusion:
Informal: swing.
phrasal verb
bring onphrasal verb
bring out
To present for circulation, exhibit, or sale:
phrasal verb
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child):
2. To put forward (a topic) for discussion:
3. To call or direct attention to something:
Translations
يُسقِـط
porazitsrazit
fældevælte
fella
pováľať

w>bring down

vt sep
(out of air) (= shoot down) bird, planeherunterholen; (= land) plane, kiteherunterbringen; to bring somebody’s wrath down (up)on onesich (dat)jds Zorn zuziehen; you’ll bring the boss down on usda werden wir es mit dem Chef zu tun bekommen
opponent, footballerzu Fall bringen; (by shooting) animalzur Strecke bringen; personniederschießen ? house
government etczu Fall bringen
(= reduce) temperature, prices, cost of livingsenken; swellingreduzieren, zurückgehen lassen

bring

(briŋ) past tense, past participle brought (broːt) verb
1. to make (something or someone) come (to or towards a place). I'll bring plenty of food with me; Bring him to me!
2. to result in. This medicine will bring you relief.
bring about
to cause. His disregard for danger brought about his death.
bring back
to (cause to) return. She brought back the umbrella she borrowed; Her singing brings back memories of my mother.
bring down
to cause to fall. The storm brought all the trees down.
bring home to
to prove or show (something) clearly to (someone). His illness brought home to her how much she depended on him.
bring off
to achieve (something attempted). They brought off an unexpected victory.
bring round
to bring back from unconsciousness. Fresh air brought him round.
bring up
1. to rear or educate. Her parents brought her up to be polite.
2. to introduce (a matter) for discussion. Bring the matter up at the next meeting.

bring towards the speaker: Mary, bring me some coffee .
take away from the speaker: Take these cups away .
fetch from somewhere else and bring to the speaker: Fetch me my book from the bedroom .
References in classic literature ?
We must absolutely bring down some game to satisfy this cannibal, or else one of these fine mornings, master will find only pieces of his servant to serve him.
Bring down my mackintosh and traveling-cloak, and some stout shoes, though we shall do little walking.
Then the countryman rejoiced at his good luck, and said, 'I like many things better than money: first, I will have a bow that will bring down everything I shoot at; secondly, a fiddle that will set everyone dancing that hears me play upon it; and thirdly, I should like that everyone should grant what I ask.
Thinking that it was time to bring down the Monarch from his raptures to the level of common sense, I determined to endeavour to open up to him some glimpses of the truth, that is to say of the nature of things in Flatland.
Surely this is to bring down the Holy Ghost, instead of the likeness of a dove, in the shape of a vulture or raven; and set, out of the bark of a Christian church, a flag of a bark of pirates, and assassins.
Turning to his adjutant he ordered him to bring down the two battalions of the Sixth Chasseurs whom they had just passed.
I tried honestly enough to kill the pigeons, but I had no luck, or too much, till I happened to bring down one of a pair that I found apart from the rest in a softy tree-top.
Yes, a dangerous matter -- so dangerous that even the most saintly dared only whisper their religious opinions with bated breath, lest something which fell from their lips might be misconstrued, and bring down a swift retribution upon them.
The irrepressible Chancellor of the Exchequer was still talking about the birds he had brought down, the birds that Burke and Halkett had brought down, and the birds that Jenkins, their host, had failed to bring down.
Thus they rushed; each man with might and main clinging to his seat, to prevent being tossed to the foam; and the tall form of Tashtego at the steering oar crouching almost double, in order to bring down his centre of gravity.
I never see the nigger, yet, I couldn't bring down with one crack," said he, bringing his fist down so near to the face of Tom that he winked and drew back.
They had come thus far in safety; but having received information from a wood-cutter that there was a strong band of outlaws lying in wait in the woods before them, Isaac's mercenaries had not only taken flight, but had carried off with them the horses which bore the litter and left the Jew and his daughter without the means either of defence or of retreat, to be plundered, and probably murdered, by the banditti, who they expected every moment would bring down upon them.