bring home


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bring

 (brĭng)
tr.v. brought (brôt), bring·ing, brings
1. To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place: brought enough money with me.
2. To carry as an attribute or contribution: You bring many years of experience to your new post.
3. To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location: bring the water to a boil; brought the meeting to a close.
4.
a. To persuade; induce: The defendant's testimony brought others to confess.
b. To get the attention of; attract: Smoke and flames brought the neighbors.
5.
a. To cause to occur as a consequence: Floods brought destruction to the valley.
b. To cause to occur as a concomitant: For many, the fall brings hay fever.
6. To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall: This music brings back memories.
7. To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
8. To be sold for: a portrait that brought a million dollars.
Phrasal Verbs:
bring about
1. To cause (something) to happen: a speech that brought about a change in public opinion.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship or boat) to head in a different direction.
bring around (or round)
1. To cause to adopt an opinion or take a certain course of action.
2. To cause to recover consciousness.
bring down
1. To cause to fall or collapse: a shot that brought down a bird; a demolition crew that brought down a building.
2. To force to the ground, as by tackling.
3. To cause to lose power or leave office: The scandal brought down the prime minister.
4. To kill.
5. To disappoint or dispirit: The cancellation of the ballgame brought us down.
bring forth
1. To give rise to; produce: plants bringing forth fruit.
2. To give birth to (young).
bring forward
1. To present; produce: bring forward proof.
2. Accounting To carry (a sum) from one page or column to another.
bring in
1. Law To give or submit (a verdict) to a court.
2. To produce, yield, or earn (profits or income).
bring off
To accomplish: bring off a successful advertising campaign.
bring on
To cause to appear: brought on the dessert.
bring out
1.
a. To reveal or expose: brought out the facts.
b. To introduce (a debutante) to society.
2. To produce or publish: bring out a new book.
3. To nurture and develop (a quality, for example) to best advantage: You bring out the best in me.
bring to
1. To cause to recover consciousness.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship) to turn into the wind or come to a stop.
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child); rear.
2. To introduce into discussion; mention.
3. To vomit.
4. To cause to come to a sudden stop.
Idioms:
bring down the house
To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
bring home
To make perfectly clear: a lecture that brought home several important points.
bring home the bacon
1. To earn a living, especially for a family.
2. To achieve desired results; have success.
bring to bear
1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
bring to light
To reveal or disclose: brought the real facts to light.
bring to (one's) knees
To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
bring to terms
To force (another) to agree.
bring up the rear
To be the last in a line or sequence.

[Middle English bringen, from Old English bringan; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bring′er n.
Usage Note: The difference between bring and take is one of perspective. Bring indicates motion toward the place from which the action is regarded—typically toward the speaker—while take indicates motion away from the place from which the action is regarded—typically away from the speaker. Thus from a customer's perspective, the customer takes checks to the bank and brings home cash, while from the banker's perspective the customer brings checks to the bank in order to take away cash. When the point of reference is not the place of speaking itself, either verb is possible, but the correct choice still depends on the desired perspective. For example, The labor leaders brought their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the mayor's office, while The labor leaders took their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the labor leaders. Be aware that the choice of bring or take determines the point of view emphasized. For example, a parent sitting at home may say of a child, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school, describing the situation from the child's viewpoint leaving school. If the viewpoint shifts to the speaker, bring becomes appropriate, as in Look, I see her coming right now, and she's bringing a whole armful of books!
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bring home - make understandable and clear; "This brings home my point"
demo, demonstrate, present, show, exhibit - give an exhibition of to an interested audience; "She shows her dogs frequently"; "We will demo the new software in Washington"
2.bring home - earn as a salary or wage; "How much does your wife take home after taxes and other deductions?"
earn, realise, pull in, bring in, realize, gain, make, take in, clear - earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages; "How much do you make a month in your new job?"; "She earns a lot in her new job"; "this merger brought in lots of money"; "He clears $5,000 each month"
References in classic literature ?
Then be busy, and bring home your fruits, getting up early to make your livelihood sure.
You yourself wait until the season for sailing is come, and then haul your swift ship down to the sea and stow a convenient cargo in it, so that you may bring home profit, even as your father and mine, foolish Perses, used to sail on shipboard because he lacked sufficient livelihood.
695-705) Bring home a wife to your house when you are of the right age, while you are not far short of thirty years nor much above; this is the right age for marriage.
800-801) On the fourth of the month bring home your bride, but choose the omens which are best for this business.
Jake was sure he could get through on horseback, and bring home our things in saddle-bags; but grandfather told him the roads would be obliterated, and a newcomer in the country would be lost ten times over.
The next day sat Zarathustra again on the stone in front of his cave, whilst his animals roved about in the world outside to bring home new food,--also new honey: for Zarathustra had spent and wasted the old honey to the very last particle.
You will bring home the work as it is finished, and your money will be always ready.
Surely, surely I bring home as much at night as any other demoiselle you employ.
As if tramp cats and mangy dogs weren't bad enough but you must needs bring home ragged little beggars from the street, who--"
Moms and dads can bring home different Red Ribbon Pasalubong Packs of Cheesy Ensaimada, Butter Mamon, Assorted Ensaimada (Cheese, Salted Caramel, and Strawberry Cheesecake), Assorted Mamon (Butter, Ube, Mocha, White Choco Almond, and Cheese), Assorted Cake Slices (Choco, Mocha Marble, Chiffon, Double Dutch, and Red Velvet), or Bestsellers (Cheesy Ensaimadas, Butter Mamons and a Choco Cake slice) to satisfy the kids' different cravings.
BRING HOME A FRIEND -- Department of Tourism Regional Director Martin Valera explains the mechanics of the 'Bring Home a Friend' tourism promotion campaign for Region 1 at Santorini Thunderbird Resort, Poro Point, San Fernando City, La Union last Friday.
The DPWH district engineering offices in Lanao del Norte and Misamis Oriental deployed 19 service vehicles to bring home 254 residents to their houses in the past three days.