bring in


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Related to bring in: bring out

bring

 (brĭng)
tr.v. brought (brôt), bring·ing, brings
1. To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place: brought enough money with me.
2. To carry as an attribute or contribution: You bring many years of experience to your new post.
3. To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location: bring the water to a boil; brought the meeting to a close.
4.
a. To persuade; induce: The defendant's testimony brought others to confess.
b. To get the attention of; attract: Smoke and flames brought the neighbors.
5.
a. To cause to occur as a consequence: Floods brought destruction to the valley.
b. To cause to occur as a concomitant: For many, the fall brings hay fever.
6. To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall: This music brings back memories.
7. To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
8. To be sold for: a portrait that brought a million dollars.
Phrasal Verbs:
bring about
1. To cause (something) to happen: a speech that brought about a change in public opinion.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship or boat) to head in a different direction.
bring around (or round)
1. To cause to adopt an opinion or take a certain course of action.
2. To cause to recover consciousness.
bring down
1. To cause to fall or collapse: a shot that brought down a bird; a demolition crew that brought down a building.
2. To force to the ground, as by tackling.
3. To cause to lose power or leave office: The scandal brought down the prime minister.
4. To kill.
5. To disappoint or dispirit: The cancellation of the ballgame brought us down.
bring forth
1. To give rise to; produce: plants bringing forth fruit.
2. To give birth to (young).
bring forward
1. To present; produce: bring forward proof.
2. Accounting To carry (a sum) from one page or column to another.
bring in
1. Law To give or submit (a verdict) to a court.
2. To produce, yield, or earn (profits or income).
bring off
To accomplish: bring off a successful advertising campaign.
bring on
To cause to appear: brought on the dessert.
bring out
1.
a. To reveal or expose: brought out the facts.
b. To introduce (a debutante) to society.
2. To produce or publish: bring out a new book.
3. To nurture and develop (a quality, for example) to best advantage: You bring out the best in me.
bring to
1. To cause to recover consciousness.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship) to turn into the wind or come to a stop.
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child); rear.
2. To introduce into discussion; mention.
3. To vomit.
4. To cause to come to a sudden stop.
Idioms:
bring down the house
To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
bring home
To make perfectly clear: a lecture that brought home several important points.
bring home the bacon
1. To earn a living, especially for a family.
2. To achieve desired results; have success.
bring to bear
1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
bring to light
To reveal or disclose: brought the real facts to light.
bring to (one's) knees
To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
bring to terms
To force (another) to agree.
bring up the rear
To be the last in a line or sequence.

[Middle English bringen, from Old English bringan; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bring′er n.
Usage Note: The difference between bring and take is one of perspective. Bring indicates motion toward the place from which the action is regarded—typically toward the speaker—while take indicates motion away from the place from which the action is regarded—typically away from the speaker. Thus from a customer's perspective, the customer takes checks to the bank and brings home cash, while from the banker's perspective the customer brings checks to the bank in order to take away cash. When the point of reference is not the place of speaking itself, either verb is possible, but the correct choice still depends on the desired perspective. For example, The labor leaders brought their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the mayor's office, while The labor leaders took their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the labor leaders. Be aware that the choice of bring or take determines the point of view emphasized. For example, a parent sitting at home may say of a child, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school, describing the situation from the child's viewpoint leaving school. If the viewpoint shifts to the speaker, bring becomes appropriate, as in Look, I see her coming right now, and she's bringing a whole armful of books!

bring in

vb (tr, adverb)
1. (Commerce) to yield (income, profit, or cash): his investments brought him in £100.
2. (Law) to produce or return (a verdict)
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to put forward or introduce (a legislative bill, etc)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bring in - bring in a new person or object into a familiar environment; "He brought in a new judge"; "The new secretary introduced a nasty rumor"
immigrate - introduce or send as immigrants; "Britain immigrated many colonists to America"
track - carry on the feet and deposit; "track mud into the house"
insinuate - introduce or insert (oneself) in a subtle manner; "He insinuated himself into the conversation of the people at the nearby table"
2.bring in - earn on some commercial or business transactionbring in - earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages; "How much do you make a month in your new job?"; "She earns a lot in her new job"; "this merger brought in lots of money"; "He clears $5,000 each month"
make - act in a certain way so as to acquire; "make friends"; "make enemies"
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
squeeze out, eke out - make by laborious and precarious means; "He eked out a living as a painter"
turn a profit, profit - make a profit; gain money or materially; "The company has not profited from the merger"
rake off - take money from an illegal transaction
take home, bring home - earn as a salary or wage; "How much does your wife take home after taxes and other deductions?"
rake in, shovel in - earn large sums of money; "Since she accepted the new position, she has been raking it in"
net, sack up, sack, clear - make as a net profit; "The company cleared $1 million"
gross - earn before taxes, expenses, etc.
pay, bear, yield - bring in; "interest-bearing accounts"; "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?"
3.bring in - be sold for a certain price; "The painting brought $10,000"; "The old print fetched a high price at the auction"
4.bring in - submit (a verdict) to a court
present, submit - hand over formally
5.bring in - transmit; "The microphone brought in the sounds from the room next to mine"
channel, transmit, carry, impart, conduct, convey - transmit or serve as the medium for transmission; "Sound carries well over water"; "The airwaves carry the sound"; "Many metals conduct heat"

bring

verb
1. To cause to come along with oneself:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
4. To achieve (a certain price).Also used with in:
phrasal verb
bring aboutphrasal verb
bring around or round
1. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
2. To cause to come back to life or consciousness:
phrasal verb
bring down
1. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
2. To bring about the downfall of:
phrasal verb
bring forth
To give birth to:
Chiefly Regional: birth.
Idiom: be brought abed of.
phrasal verb
bring in
To make as income or profit:
phrasal verb
bring off
To bring about and carry to a successful conclusion:
Informal: swing.
phrasal verb
bring onphrasal verb
bring out
To present for circulation, exhibit, or sale:
phrasal verb
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child):
2. To put forward (a topic) for discussion:
3. To call or direct attention to something:
Translations

w>bring in

vt sep
(lit) person, objecthereinbringen (→ prep obj, -to in +acc); harvesteinbringen, bergen (esp DDR); sailseinziehen; to bring in the New Yeardas neue Jahr begrüßen
(fig: = introduce) fashion, customeinführen; (Parl) billeinbringen; to bring something into fashionetw in Mode bringen
(= involve, call in) police, consultant etceinschalten (on bei); don’t bring him into itlass ihn aus der Sache raus; she’s bound to bring Freud insie wird bestimmt Freud mit hereinbringen; why bring Freud/that in?was hat Freud/das damit zu tun?
(Fin) income, money, interest(ein)bringen (-to sb jdm); (Comm) businessbringen
(Jur, jury) verdictfällen
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the city policy, police are prohibited from asking crime victims about their residency status and may only bring in the U.
Ask them to bring in recordings of songs that contain references to thunder and lightning.
Users can bring in QuickTime files with alpha channels directly from applications like Adobe After Effects.