bring out


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Related to bring out: bring about

bring

 (brĭng)
tr.v. brought (brôt), bring·ing, brings
1. To carry, convey, lead, or cause to go along to another place: brought enough money with me.
2. To carry as an attribute or contribution: You bring many years of experience to your new post.
3. To lead or force into a specified state, situation, or location: bring the water to a boil; brought the meeting to a close.
4.
a. To persuade; induce: The defendant's testimony brought others to confess.
b. To get the attention of; attract: Smoke and flames brought the neighbors.
5.
a. To cause to occur as a consequence: Floods brought destruction to the valley.
b. To cause to occur as a concomitant: For many, the fall brings hay fever.
6. To cause to become apparent to the mind; recall: This music brings back memories.
7. To advance or set forth (charges) in a court.
8. To be sold for: a portrait that brought a million dollars.
Phrasal Verbs:
bring about
1. To cause (something) to happen: a speech that brought about a change in public opinion.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship or boat) to head in a different direction.
bring around (or round)
1. To cause to adopt an opinion or take a certain course of action.
2. To cause to recover consciousness.
bring down
1. To cause to fall or collapse: a shot that brought down a bird; a demolition crew that brought down a building.
2. To force to the ground, as by tackling.
3. To cause to lose power or leave office: The scandal brought down the prime minister.
4. To kill.
5. To disappoint or dispirit: The cancellation of the ballgame brought us down.
bring forth
1. To give rise to; produce: plants bringing forth fruit.
2. To give birth to (young).
bring forward
1. To present; produce: bring forward proof.
2. Accounting To carry (a sum) from one page or column to another.
bring in
1. Law To give or submit (a verdict) to a court.
2. To produce, yield, or earn (profits or income).
bring off
To accomplish: bring off a successful advertising campaign.
bring on
To cause to appear: brought on the dessert.
bring out
1.
a. To reveal or expose: brought out the facts.
b. To introduce (a debutante) to society.
2. To produce or publish: bring out a new book.
3. To nurture and develop (a quality, for example) to best advantage: You bring out the best in me.
bring to
1. To cause to recover consciousness.
2. Nautical To cause (a ship) to turn into the wind or come to a stop.
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child); rear.
2. To introduce into discussion; mention.
3. To vomit.
4. To cause to come to a sudden stop.
Idioms:
bring down the house
To win overwhelming approval from an audience.
bring home
To make perfectly clear: a lecture that brought home several important points.
bring home the bacon
1. To earn a living, especially for a family.
2. To achieve desired results; have success.
bring to bear
1. To exert; apply: bring pressure to bear on the student's parents.
2. To put (something) to good use: "All of one's faculties are brought to bear in an effort to become fully incorporated into the landscape" (Barry Lopez).
bring to light
To reveal or disclose: brought the real facts to light.
bring to (one's) knees
To reduce to a position of subservience or submission.
bring to terms
To force (another) to agree.
bring up the rear
To be the last in a line or sequence.

[Middle English bringen, from Old English bringan; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bring′er n.
Usage Note: The difference between bring and take is one of perspective. Bring indicates motion toward the place from which the action is regarded—typically toward the speaker—while take indicates motion away from the place from which the action is regarded—typically away from the speaker. Thus from a customer's perspective, the customer takes checks to the bank and brings home cash, while from the banker's perspective the customer brings checks to the bank in order to take away cash. When the point of reference is not the place of speaking itself, either verb is possible, but the correct choice still depends on the desired perspective. For example, The labor leaders brought their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the mayor's office, while The labor leaders took their requests to the mayor's office suggests a point of view centered around the labor leaders. Be aware that the choice of bring or take determines the point of view emphasized. For example, a parent sitting at home may say of a child, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school, describing the situation from the child's viewpoint leaving school. If the viewpoint shifts to the speaker, bring becomes appropriate, as in Look, I see her coming right now, and she's bringing a whole armful of books!

bring out

vb (tr, adverb)
1. (Journalism & Publishing) to produce or publish or have published: when are you bringing out a new dictionary?.
2. to expose, reveal, or cause to be seen: she brought out the best in me.
3. to encourage (a shy person) to be less reserved (often in the phrase bring (someone) out of himself or herself)
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Brit (of a trade union, provocative action by management, misunderstanding, etc) to cause (workers) to strike
5. (Pathology) (foll by in) to cause (a person) to become covered (with spots, a rash, etc)
6. Brit to introduce (a girl) formally into society as a debutante
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bring out - make visible; "Summer brings out bright clothes"; "He brings out the best in her"
show - make visible or noticeable; "She showed her talent for cooking"; "Show me your etchings, please"
disclose, expose - disclose to view as by removing a cover; "The curtain rose to disclose a stunning set"
excavate, unearth - recover through digging; "Schliemann excavated Troy"; "excavate gold"
trot out - bring out and show for inspection and admiration; "His novel trots out a rich heiress"; "always able to trot out some new excuse"
unfold - open to the view; "A walk through town will unfold many interesting buildings"
2.bring out - bring out of a specific state
let go, let go of, release, relinquish - release, as from one's grip; "Let go of the door handle, please!"; "relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall"
3.bring out - prepare and issue for public distribution or sale; "publish a magazine or newspaper"
publicize, bare, publicise, air - make public; "She aired her opinions on welfare"
edit - supervise the publication of; "The same family has been editing the influential newspaper for almost 100 years"
4.bring out - direct attention to, as if by means of contrast; "This dress accentuates your nice figure!"; "I set off these words by brackets"
pick up - lift out or reflect from a background; "The scarf picks up the color of the skirt"; "His eyes picked up his smile"
foreground, highlight, play up, spotlight - move into the foreground to make more visible or prominent; "The introduction highlighted the speaker's distinguished career in linguistics"
raise - bring (a surface or a design) into relief and cause to project; "raised edges"
accent, accentuate, emphasize, stress, punctuate, emphasise - to stress, single out as important; "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
5.bring out - bring onto the market or release; "produce a movie"; "bring out a book"; "produce a new play"
offer - produce or introduce on the stage; "The Shakespeare Company is offering `King Lear' this month"
6.bring out - encourage to be less reserved; "The teacher tried to bring out the shy boy"
encourage - inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
7.bring out - take out of a container or enclosed space; "Get out your best dress--we are going to a party!"
winkle out, winkle - remove or displace from a position
unpack, take out - remove from its packing; "unpack the presents"
8.bring out - bring before the public for the first time, as of an actor, song, etc.
acquaint, introduce, present - cause to come to know personally; "permit me to acquaint you with my son"; "introduce the new neighbors to the community"
9.bring out - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secretbring out - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret; "The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold"; "The actress won't reveal how old she is"; "bring out the truth"; "he broke the news to her"; "unwrap the evidence in the murder case"
blackwash - bring (information) out of concealment
muckrake - explore and expose misconduct and scandals concerning public figures; "This reporter was well-known for his muckraking"
blow - cause to be revealed and jeopardized; "The story blew their cover"; "The double agent was blown by the other side"
out - reveal (something) about somebody's identity or lifestyle; "The gay actor was outed last week"; "Someone outed a CIA agent"
come out of the closet, out, come out - to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality; "This actor outed last year"
spring - produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; "He sprang these news on me just as I was leaving"
get around, get out, break - be released or become known; of news; "News of her death broke in the morning"
betray, bewray - reveal unintentionally; "Her smile betrayed her true feelings"
confide - reveal in private; tell confidentially
leak - tell anonymously; "The news were leaked to the paper"
babble out, blab, blab out, let the cat out of the bag, peach, spill the beans, tattle, babble, talk, sing - divulge confidential information or secrets; "Be careful--his secretary talks"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
reveal - disclose directly or through prophets; "God rarely reveal his plans for Mankind"

bring

verb
1. To cause to come along with oneself:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
4. To achieve (a certain price).Also used with in:
phrasal verb
bring aboutphrasal verb
bring around or round
1. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
2. To cause to come back to life or consciousness:
phrasal verb
bring down
1. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
2. To bring about the downfall of:
phrasal verb
bring forth
To give birth to:
Chiefly Regional: birth.
Idiom: be brought abed of.
phrasal verb
bring in
To make as income or profit:
phrasal verb
bring off
To bring about and carry to a successful conclusion:
Informal: swing.
phrasal verb
bring onphrasal verb
bring out
To present for circulation, exhibit, or sale:
phrasal verb
bring up
1. To take care of and educate (a child):
2. To put forward (a topic) for discussion:
3. To call or direct attention to something:
Translations

w>bring out

vt sep
(lit)(heraus)bringen (of aus); (of pocket)herausholen (of aus)
(= draw out) persondie Hemmungen nehmen (+dat); can’t you bring him out (of his shell) a bit?können Sie nichts tun, damit er ein bisschen aus sich herausgeht?
(= elicit) greed, braveryzum Vorschein bringen; best qualities alsoherausbringen; to bring out the best/worst in somebodydas Beste/Schlimmste in jdm zum Vorschein bringen
(also bring out on strike) workersauf die Straße schicken
(= make blossom) flowersherausbringen
(to society) debutantein die Gesellschaft einführen
(= bring on the market) new product, bookherausbringen
(= emphasize, show up)herausbringen, hervorheben
(= utter) few wordsherausbringen; cryausstoßen
to bring somebody out in spots/a rashbei jdm Pickel/einen Ausschlag verursachen
References in periodicals archive ?
c) Bring outs his guitar and starts doing impressions of other members of staff?