brink


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brink

 (brĭngk)
n.
1.
a. The upper edge of a steep or vertical slope: the brink of a cliff. See Synonyms at border.
b. The margin of land bordering a body of water.
2. The point at which something is likely to begin; the verge: "Time and again the monarchs and statesmen of Europe approached the brink of conflict" (W. Bruce Lincoln).

[Middle English brinke, probably of Scandinavian origin ; akin to Swedish brink brink, steep hillside, steep riverbank, and Middle Low German brink, hillside, grassland.]

brink

(brɪŋk)
n
1. the edge, border, or verge of a steep place: the brink of the precipice.
2. the highest point; top: the sun fell below the brink of the hill.
3. (Physical Geography) the land at the edge of a body of water
4. the verge of an event or state: the brink of disaster.
[C13: from Middle Dutch brinc, of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse brekka slope, Middle Low German brink edge of a field]

brink

(brɪŋk)

n.
1. the edge or margin of a steep place or of land bordering water.
2. any extreme edge; verge.
3. a critical point beyond which something will occur: on the brink of disaster.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old Norse (Dan)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brink - a region marking a boundarybrink - a region marking a boundary    
bound, boundary, edge - a line determining the limits of an area
2.brink - the edge of a steep place
edge, border - the boundary of a surface
3.brink - the limit beyond which something happens or changes; "on the verge of tears"; "on the brink of bankruptcy"
limit, bound, boundary - the greatest possible degree of something; "what he did was beyond the bounds of acceptable behavior"; "to the limit of his ability"

brink

noun edge, point, limit, border, lip, margin, boundary, skirt, frontier, fringe, verge, threshold, rim, brim Their economy is teetering on the brink of collapse.

brink

noun
1. A fairly narrow line or space forming a boundary:
Chiefly Military: perimeter.
2. A transitional interval beyond which some new action or different state of affairs is likely to begin or occur:
Translations
حافه، حافَّه، حَرْف، شَفيرُ الهاوِيَه
okrajpříkrý břeh
bredkant
parrasreuna
meredek part
brún, barmur, bakki
status krantas
krastsmala
randsteile rand
strmý svahzráz

brink

[brɪŋk] N (lit, fig) → borde m
on the brink of sthal borde de algo
to be on the brink of doing sthestar a punto de hacer algo

brink

[ˈbrɪŋk] nbord m
to be on the brink of sth [+ disaster, war, tears] → être au bord de qch
She was on the brink of tears → Elle était au bord des larmes.
on the brink of doing → sur le point de faire, à deux doigts de faire

brink

n (lit, fig)Rand m; on the brink of something (lit, fig)am Rande von etw; on the brink of doing something (lit, fig)nahe daran, etw zu tun

brink

[brɪŋk] norlo
on the brink of doing sth → sul punto di fare qc
she was on the brink of tears → era lì lì per piangere

brink

(briŋk) noun
the edge or border of a steep, dangerous place or of a river.
References in classic literature ?
You might as well expect the river to lie still on the brink of those black rocks a mile above us, though your own ears tell you that it is tumbling over them at this very moment.
Clifford is on the brink of as black a ruin as ever befell him yet
It had been intentionally left as much as possible out of sight and was tied to one of the stakes of a fence that came, just there, down to the brink and that had been an assistance to disembarking.
After half an hour of such depressing conversation, they had their minds quite made up that they had been saved at the brink of a precipice; but then Szedvilas went away, and Jonas, who was a sharp little man, reminded them that the delicatessen business was a failure, according to its proprietor, and that this might account for his pessimistic views.
Now, like Mira, it was cold and quiet, wrapped in its shroud of snow; but Rebecca knelt by the brink, and putting her ear to the glaze of ice, fancied, where it used to be deepest, she could hear a faint, tinkling sound.
It little mattered whether my curiosity irritated him; I knew the pleasure of vexing and soothing him by turns; it was one I chiefly delighted in, and a sure instinct always prevented me from going too far; beyond the verge of provocation I never ventured; on the extreme brink I liked well to try my skill.
On the brink of that terrible conclusion, Miss Garth shrank back in dismay.
I doubt, sir," returned the nephew, "whether, if it had carried me to the utmost brink of death, you would have cared to stop me there.
However, I said 'No,' and I added, 'You don't seem to be either, though you say you are,' - for she was walking much too near the brink of a sort of old jetty or wooden causeway we had strolled upon, and I was afraid of her falling over.
I had alighted from Joe's back on the brink of the ditch when we came up, and had not moved since.
Already her feet were over the brink of the rapids, but I pulled and Koos pulled, and we brought her safe into the shadows, and from the shallows to the bank, and there she fell gasping.
Half a second before you had only to dash the book from the priest's hands, and put your hand over his mouth, and though thus giddily swinging on the brink of the precipice, you are saved.