brinksmanship


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Related to brinksmanship: Eisenhower Doctrine, U-2 incident

brink·man·ship

 (brĭngk′mən-shĭp′) also brinks·man·ship (brĭngks′-)
n.
The practice, especially in international politics, of seeking advantage by creating the impression that one is willing and able to push a highly dangerous situation to the limit rather than concede.

brinkmanship, brinksmanship

the technique or practice in foreign policy of manipulating a dangerous situation to the limits of tolerance or safety in order to secure advantage, especially by creating diplomatic crises.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
He added that he is "frustrated" with the level of partisanship and brinksmanship witnessed in the last month.
Besides the brinksmanship on the debt limit, House and Senate leaders narrowly avoided a government shutdown earlier this year.
The king's decree - which covers several Shiite activists accused of plotting against the state - adds to the brinksmanship on both sides that has included a massive pro-government rally Monday and the planned returned of a prominent opposition figure from exile.
One of the most dangerous consequences of this situation is that Pyongyang's nuclear brinksmanship will be emulated worldwide by other belligerent states that aspire to possess weapons of mass destruction.
In the two weeks before penning this column, England changed prime ministers, President Obama hosted Mexican President Calderon for a state visit with polarizing immigration issues front and center, anti-government demonstrations erupted in Greece and Thailand, and north and South Korea engaged in brinksmanship not seen since the 1950s.
In brisk and incisive prose, Perlstein narrates how Nixon relentlessly exploited this Orthogonian morality in the service of increasingly divisive political brinksmanship.
Was this a piece of brinksmanship by the railways, because by the following year they had retracted the threat and moved in, and Stratford House remained as LMS offices until 1946, when they moved out again.
Before reaching the stage of no return, the "rational camp" in Tehran would put the breaks on, halting the brinksmanship tendencies evinced by Ahmadinejad.
But ever since that piece of political brinksmanship, one could argue that both companies have struggled to right themselves and to bring cohesiveness back to their corporate cultures.
It is a gripping account of political intrigue and brinksmanship that will raise eyebrows in many quarters.
They fought for these rights and privileges, centering on local control of elections, representation, finances, and taxation, with a politics of brinksmanship that saw such conflicts as a zero-sum game and provided the grounding for the eventual independence bid.
VIC SAID: "MARK SCHWARZER has picked a bad time for his brinksmanship.