brood


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Related to brood: brood over

brood

 (bro͞od)
n.
1. The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
2. The children in one family.
v. brood·ed, brood·ing, broods
v.intr.
1.
a. To focus the attention on a subject persistently and moodily; worry: brooded about his future; brooded over the insult for several days.
b. To be depressed: All he seemed to do was sit and brood.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
3. To hover envelopingly; hang: Mist brooded over the moor.
v.tr.
1. To think about (something) persistently or moodily: brooded that her work might come to nothing.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

[Middle English, from Old English brōd; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

brood′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: brood, dwell, fret1, mope, worry
These verbs mean to turn something over in the mind moodily and at length: brooding about his decline in popularity; dwelled on her defeat; fretted over the loss of his job; moping about his illness; worrying about the unpaid bills.

brood

(bruːd)
n
1. (Zoology) a number of young animals, esp birds, produced at one hatching
2. all the offspring in one family: often used jokingly or contemptuously
3. a group of a particular kind; breed
4. (Breeds) (as modifier) kept for breeding: a brood mare.
vb
5. (Zoology) (of a bird)
a. to sit on or hatch (eggs)
b. (tr) to cover (young birds) protectively with the wings
6. (when: intr, often foll by on, over or upon) to ponder morbidly or persistently
[Old English brōd; related to Middle High German bruot, Dutch broed; see breed]
ˈbrooding n, adj
ˈbroodingly adv

brood

(brud)
n.
1. a number of young produced or hatched at one time; family of offspring or young.
2. a breed, species, group, or kind.
v.t.
3. to sit upon (eggs) to hatch, as a bird; incubate.
4. (of a bird) to warm, protect, or cover (young) with the wings or body.
5. to think or worry persistently or moodily about; ponder: to brood a problem.
v.i.
6. to sit upon eggs to be hatched, as a bird.
7. to dwell on a subject or to meditate with morbid persistence (usu. fol. by over or on).
adj.
8. kept for breeding: a brood hen.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English brōd; c. Middle Dutch broet, Old High German bruot; akin to breed]
brood′less, adj.

Brood

 the young of animals or of birds, hatched or reared at the same time or from the same dam. See also aerie, breed, fry.
Examples: brood of birds, 1530; of blackgame, 1805; of smallboats; of chess players [modern pun on to broodLipton, 1970]; of chicken, 1611; of daughters, 1896; of ducks, 1711; of eels, 1558; of eagles; of eggs; of folly, 1632; of game; of grouse; of guilty wishes, 1863; of hawks; of heath fowl, 1805; of hens, 1486; of kittens; of lies, 1798; of oysters [in second year], 1862; of petty despots, 1867; of poisons, 1719; of presbyterians, 1706; of salmon, 1389; of serpents, 1697; of silkworms, 1760; of time, 1597.

brood


Past participle: brooded
Gerund: brooding

Imperative
brood
brood
Present
I brood
you brood
he/she/it broods
we brood
you brood
they brood
Preterite
I brooded
you brooded
he/she/it brooded
we brooded
you brooded
they brooded
Present Continuous
I am brooding
you are brooding
he/she/it is brooding
we are brooding
you are brooding
they are brooding
Present Perfect
I have brooded
you have brooded
he/she/it has brooded
we have brooded
you have brooded
they have brooded
Past Continuous
I was brooding
you were brooding
he/she/it was brooding
we were brooding
you were brooding
they were brooding
Past Perfect
I had brooded
you had brooded
he/she/it had brooded
we had brooded
you had brooded
they had brooded
Future
I will brood
you will brood
he/she/it will brood
we will brood
you will brood
they will brood
Future Perfect
I will have brooded
you will have brooded
he/she/it will have brooded
we will have brooded
you will have brooded
they will have brooded
Future Continuous
I will be brooding
you will be brooding
he/she/it will be brooding
we will be brooding
you will be brooding
they will be brooding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been brooding
you have been brooding
he/she/it has been brooding
we have been brooding
you have been brooding
they have been brooding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been brooding
you will have been brooding
he/she/it will have been brooding
we will have been brooding
you will have been brooding
they will have been brooding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been brooding
you had been brooding
he/she/it had been brooding
we had been brooding
you had been brooding
they had been brooding
Conditional
I would brood
you would brood
he/she/it would brood
we would brood
you would brood
they would brood
Past Conditional
I would have brooded
you would have brooded
he/she/it would have brooded
we would have brooded
you would have brooded
they would have brooded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brood - the young of an animal cared for at one time
animal group - a group of animals
clutch - a number of birds hatched at the same time
Verb1.brood - think moodily or anxiously about something
worry, care - be concerned with; "I worry about my grades"
2.brood - hang over, as of something threatening, dark, or menacing; "The terrible vision brooded over her all day long"
hang - be menacing, burdensome, or oppressive; "This worry hangs on my mind"; "The cloud of suspicion hangs over her"
eclipse, overshadow, dominate - be greater in significance than; "the tragedy overshadowed the couple's happiness"
3.brood - be in a huff and display one's displeasure; "She is pouting because she didn't get what she wanted"
grizzle, stew, brood - be in a huff; be silent or sullen
4.brood - be in a huff; be silent or sullen
pout, sulk, brood - be in a huff and display one's displeasure; "She is pouting because she didn't get what she wanted"
5.brood - sit on (eggs); "Birds brood"; "The female covers the eggs"
procreate, reproduce, multiply - have offspring or produce more individuals of a given animal or plant; "The Bible tells people to procreate"
hatch - emerge from the eggs; "young birds, fish, and reptiles hatch"
breed, cover - copulate with a female, used especially of horses; "The horse covers the mare"

brood

noun
1. offspring, young, issue, breed, infants, clutch, hatch, litter, chicks, progeny The last brood of the elderly pair was hatched.
2. children, family, offspring, progeny, nearest and dearest, flesh and blood She flew to the defence of her brood.
verb
1. think, obsess, muse, ponder, fret, meditate, agonize, mull over, mope, ruminate, eat your heart out, dwell upon, repine She constantly broods about her family.

brood

noun
1. The offspring, as of an animal or a bird, for example, that are the result of one breeding season:
2. A group consisting of those descended directly from the same parents or ancestors:
verb
To focus the attention on something moodily and at length:
Informal: stew.
Translations
تَرْخُمُ ، تَحْضِنُعَدَدُ الصِّغاريُفَكِّرُ بِقَلَق، يَسْتَسْلِمُ للكآبَه
dumatmláďatasedět na vejcích
kuldrugeflokgruble
hautoakatraspesuepoikuevartioida
fészekaljatûnõdik
liggja áungahópurvelta sér upp úr
perėtisukti galvąsvarstytivada
pārdomātperējumsperēt
sedieť na vajciach
ältaruva
arpacı kumrusu gibi düşünmekkara kara düşünmekkuluçkaya yatmakkuş yavruları

brood

[bruːd]
A. N (gen) → cría f, camada f; [of chicks] → nidada f; [of insects etc] → generación f (hum) [of children] → prole f
B. VI
1. [bird] → empollar
2. (fig) [person] → ponerse melancólico
to brood on or overdar vueltas a
you mustn't brood over itno debes darle tantas vueltas
disaster brooded over the townse cernía el desastre sobre la ciudad
C. CPD brood mare Nyegua f de cría

brood

[ˈbruːd]
n
[birds] → couvée f
[children] → progéniture f
vi
[hen] → couver
[storm] → couver
[person] → broyer du noir
to brood about sth → ruminer ses or des inquiétudes à propos de qch, se faire du mauvais sang à propos de qch
to brood on sth, to brood over sth [+ failure, misfortune] → remâcher qch; [+ past] → ressasser qch; [+ idea] → ruminer qch

brood

n (lit, fig)Brut f
vi
(bird)brüten
(fig, person) → grübeln; (despondently also) → brüten

brood

[bruːd]
1. n (of chicks) → covata; (of birds) → nidiata (hum) (of children) → prole f
2. vi (bird) → covare (fig) (person) → rimuginare, stare a pensare
brood on vi + preprimuginare su, stare a pensare a

brood

(bruːd) verb
1. (of birds) to sit on eggs.
2. to think (about something) anxiously for some time. There's no point in brooding about what happened.
noun
the number of young hatched at one time.
References in classic literature ?
Instead of serried rows of bees sealing up every gap in the combs and keeping the brood warm, he sees the skillful complex structures of the combs, but no longer in their former state of purity.
They heard a frame crack stickily, saw it heaved high and twirled round between enormous hands--a blotched, bulged, and perished horror of grey wax, corrupt brood, and small drone-cells, all covered with crawling Oddities, strange to the sun.
Nothing there is motionless - Nothing save the airs that brood Over the magic solitude.
Not long after they had agreed upon this plan, the Eagle, being in want of provision for her young ones, swooped down while the Fox was out, seized upon one of the little cubs, and feasted herself and her brood.
Don't brood too much," she wrote to Helen, "on the superiority of the unseen to the seen.
The truth was, that the little Puritans, being of the most intolerant brood that ever lived, had got a vague idea of something outlandish, unearthly, or at variance with ordinary fashions, in the mother and child, and therefore scorned them in their hearts, and not unfrequently reviled them with their tongues.
But released from the spell of his brother-in-law's personal magnetism, Mr Blatherwick was apt to brood.
It will serve to keep the squatter and his brood under cover, and for ourselves there is little reason to fear.
And she rose up and drove them before her, till the bride saw them from her window, and was so pleased that she came forth and asked her if she would sell the brood.
His deep, oval-shaped eyes were fixed upon the flames, but behind the superficial glaze seemed to brood an observant and whimsical spirit, which kept the brown of the eye still unusually vivid.
Happily, however, during that spring, they never, but once, got anything but empty nests, or eggs--being too impatient to leave them till the birds were hatched; that once, Tom, who had been with his uncle into the neighbouring plantation, came running in high glee into the garden, with a brood of little callow nestlings in his hands.
Foremost through the sparkling sea shoots on the gay, embattled, bantering bow, but only to drag dark Ahab after it, where he broods within his sternward cabin, builded over the dead water of the wake, and further on, hunted by its wolfish gurglings.