brooding


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brood

 (bro͞od)
n.
1. The young of certain animals, especially a group of young birds hatched at one time and cared for together.
2. The children in one family.
v. brood·ed, brood·ing, broods
v.intr.
1.
a. To focus the attention on a subject persistently and moodily; worry: brooded about his future; brooded over the insult for several days.
b. To be depressed: All he seemed to do was sit and brood.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch eggs.
b. To protect developing eggs or young.
3. To hover envelopingly; hang: Mist brooded over the moor.
v.tr.
1. To think about (something) persistently or moodily: brooded that her work might come to nothing.
2.
a. To sit on or hatch (eggs).
b. To protect (developing eggs or young).
adj.
Kept for breeding: a brood hen.

[Middle English, from Old English brōd; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

brood′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: brood, dwell, fret1, mope, worry
These verbs mean to turn something over in the mind moodily and at length: brooding about his decline in popularity; dwelled on her defeat; fretted over the loss of his job; moping about his illness; worrying about the unpaid bills.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brooding - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the bodybrooding - sitting on eggs so as to hatch them by the warmth of the body
birthing, giving birth, parturition, birth - the process of giving birth
2.brooding - persistent morbid meditation on a problem
melancholy - a feeling of thoughtful sadness
Adj.1.brooding - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

brooding

adjective gloomy, troubled, depressed, moody, glum, dejected, despondent, downcast, morose A heavy, brooding silence descended on them.
Translations

brooding

[ˈbruːdɪŋ] ADJ [evil, presence etc] → siniestro, amenazador

brooding

[ˈbruːdɪŋ] (literary) adj
(= ominous) [silence, atmosphere] → troublant(e)
(= thoughtful) [eyes, look] → soucieux/euse
References in classic literature ?
Never mind, you've got the tarlatan for the big party, and you always look like an angel in white," said Amy, brooding over the little store of finery in which her soul delighted.
When he was out hunting, he used to go into the empty log house and sit there, brooding.
Montcalm lingered long and melancholy on the strand where he had been left by his companion, brooding deeply on the temper which his ungovernable ally had just discovered.
Worst of all, when the actual duties are comprised in such petty details as now vexed the brooding soul of the old gentlewoman.
Soon, likewise, my old native town will loom upon me through the haze of memory, a mist brooding over and around it; as if it were no portion of the real earth, but an overgrown village in cloud-land, with only imaginary inhabitants to people its wooden houses and walk its homely lanes, and the unpicturesque prolixity of its main street.
the lady of his heart was his partner in the dance, and smiling graciously in reply to all his amorous oglings; while Brom Bones, sorely smitten with love and jealousy, sat brooding by himself in one corner.
He spent half an hour brooding over this-- and then suddenly he straightened up and the blood rushed into his face.
I cannot divine what it meaneth, This haunting nameless pain: A tale of the bygone ages Keeps brooding through my brain:
As he was finishing his task, Tom, wearied with another brooding tramp, entered the house and went tiptoeing past the sitting room door.
Two hoarse whispers delivered the same awful word simultaneously to the brooding night:
In all the earlier years when her babies were young, carking cares and anxieties darkened the fireside with their brooding wings.
She felt the loss of Willoughby's character yet more heavily than she had felt the loss of his heart; his seduction and desertion of Miss Williams, the misery of that poor girl, and the doubt of what his designs might ONCE have been on herself, preyed altogether so much on her spirits, that she could not bring herself to speak of what she felt even to Elinor; and, brooding over her sorrows in silence, gave more pain to her sister than could have been communicated by the most open and most frequent confession of them.