broom


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Related to broom: groom

broom

 (bro͞om, bro͝om)
n.
1. An implement used for sweeping, typically consisting of a bunch of stiff synthetic fibers or broomcorn stalks, or formerly twigs or straw, bound together and attached to a handle.
2.
a. Any of various European and North African shrubs of the genus Cytisus in the pea family, especially C. scoparius, having mostly compound leaves with three leaflets and showy, usually bright yellow flowers.
b. Any of several similar or related shrubs, especially in the genera Genista and Spartium.
tr.v. broomed, broom·ing, brooms
To sweep with a broom.

[Middle English brom, from Old English brōm, broom plant (Cytisus scoparius and similar plants); akin to Dutch braam, blackberry, bramble, from Germanic *brēmaz, prickly shrub.]

broom′y adj.

broom

(bruːm; brʊm)
n
1. (Tools) an implement for sweeping consisting of a long handle to which is attached either a brush of straw, bristles, or twigs, bound together, or a solid head into which are set tufts of bristles or fibres
2. (Plants) any of various yellow-flowered Eurasian leguminous shrubs of the genera Cytisus, Genista, and Spartium, esp C. scoparius
3. (Plants) any of various similar Eurasian plants of the related genera Genista and Spartium
4. new broom a newly appointed official, etc, eager to make changes
vb
(tr) to sweep with a broom
[Old English brōm; related to Old High German brāmo, Middle Dutch bremme]

broom

(brum, brʊm)
n.
1. an implement for sweeping, consisting of a brush of straw or some other stiff material on a long handle.
2. any of several flowering shrubs or small trees of the genera Cytisus and Genista, of the legume family, esp. C. scoparius, with yellow flowers borne on long branches.
v.t.
3. to sweep.
4. to splinter or fray mechanically.
[before 1000; Middle English brome, Old English brōm]

broom

- Was first called a besom, but evolved because many of them were made of twigs from the wild broom shrub.
See also related terms for twigs.

broom


Past participle: broomed
Gerund: brooming

Imperative
broom
broom
Present
I broom
you broom
he/she/it brooms
we broom
you broom
they broom
Preterite
I broomed
you broomed
he/she/it broomed
we broomed
you broomed
they broomed
Present Continuous
I am brooming
you are brooming
he/she/it is brooming
we are brooming
you are brooming
they are brooming
Present Perfect
I have broomed
you have broomed
he/she/it has broomed
we have broomed
you have broomed
they have broomed
Past Continuous
I was brooming
you were brooming
he/she/it was brooming
we were brooming
you were brooming
they were brooming
Past Perfect
I had broomed
you had broomed
he/she/it had broomed
we had broomed
you had broomed
they had broomed
Future
I will broom
you will broom
he/she/it will broom
we will broom
you will broom
they will broom
Future Perfect
I will have broomed
you will have broomed
he/she/it will have broomed
we will have broomed
you will have broomed
they will have broomed
Future Continuous
I will be brooming
you will be brooming
he/she/it will be brooming
we will be brooming
you will be brooming
they will be brooming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been brooming
you have been brooming
he/she/it has been brooming
we have been brooming
you have been brooming
they have been brooming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been brooming
you will have been brooming
he/she/it will have been brooming
we will have been brooming
you will have been brooming
they will have been brooming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been brooming
you had been brooming
he/she/it had been brooming
we had been brooming
you had been brooming
they had been brooming
Conditional
I would broom
you would broom
he/she/it would broom
we would broom
you would broom
they would broom
Past Conditional
I would have broomed
you would have broomed
he/she/it would have broomed
we would have broomed
you would have broomed
they would have broomed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.broom - a cleaning implement for sweepingbroom - a cleaning implement for sweeping; bundle of straws or twigs attached to a long handle
besom - a broom made of twigs tied together on a long handle
broom handle, broomstick - the handle of a broom
cleaning device, cleaning equipment, cleaning implement - any of a large class of implements used for cleaning
push broom - a wide broom that is pushed ahead of the sweeper
whisk broom, whisk - a small short-handled broom used to brush clothes
2.broom - any of various shrubs of the genera Cytisus or Genista or Spartium having long slender branches and racemes of yellow flowers
Papilionoideae, subfamily Papilionoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Papilionaceae
weeping tree broom - small shrubby tree of New Zealand having weeping branches and racemes of white to violet flowers followed by woolly indehiscent two-seeded pods
Cytisus albus, Cytisus multiflorus, white broom, white Spanish broom - low European broom having trifoliate leaves and yellowish-white flowers
common broom, Cytisus scoparius, green broom, Scotch broom - deciduous erect spreading broom native to western Europe; widely cultivated for its rich yellow flowers
broom tree, Genista anglica, needle furze, petty whin - prickly yellow-flowered shrub of the moors of New England and Europe
Genista hispanica, Spanish gorse, Spanish broom - erect shrub of southwestern Europe having racemes of golden yellow flowers
dyer's greenweed, dyer's-broom, dyeweed, Genista tinctoria, greenweed, woadwaxen, woodwaxen, whin - small Eurasian shrub having clusters of yellow flowers that yield a dye; common as a weed in Britain and the United States; sometimes grown as an ornamental
Spanish broom, Spartium junceum, weaver's broom - tall thornless shrub having pale yellow flowers and flexible rushlike twigs used in basketry; of southwestern Europe and Mediterranean; naturalized in California
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
3.broom - common Old World heath represented by many varietiesbroom - common Old World heath represented by many varieties; low evergreen grown widely in the northern hemisphere
heath - a low evergreen shrub of the family Ericaceae; has small bell-shaped pink or purple flowers
Calluna, genus Calluna - one species
Verb1.broom - sweep with a broom or as if with a broom; "Sweep the crumbs off the table"; "Sweep under the bed"
wipe, pass over - rub with a circular motion; "wipe the blackboard"; "He passed his hands over the soft cloth"
sweep - clean by sweeping; "Please sweep the floor"
2.broom - finish with a broom
finish - provide with a finish; "The carpenter finished the table beautifully"; "this shirt is not finished properly"
Translations
مِكْنَسَةمُكْنِسَهوزّال
ginesta
koštěsmetákjanovec
kostgyvel
balailo
luudpühkima
luutaluutiaharjalakaista
metla
rekettye
gullsópurkústur
ほうき
sausakrūmisšluota
irbuleneslota
prútnatec
metla
kvastsopkvast
ไม้กวาด
katırtırnağısaplı süpürgesüpürge
chổi

broom

[bruːm, brʊm]
A. N
1. (= brush) → escoba f
new broom (fig) → escoba f nueva
a new broom sweeps cleanescoba nueva barre bien
2. (Bot) → retama f, hiniesta f
B. CPD broom closet (US) broom cupboard (Brit) Narmario m de los artículos de limpieza

broom

[ˈbrʊm] n (for sweeping)balai m

broom

n
Besen m; a new broom sweeps clean (Prov) → neue Besen kehren gut (Prov)
(Bot) → Ginster m

broom

:
broom cupboard
nBesenschrank m
broomstick
nBesenstiel m; a witch on her broomeine Hexe auf ihrem Besen

broom

[brʊm] n (brush) → scopa (Bot) → ginestra

broom

(bruːm) noun
1. a wild shrub of the pea family with (usually yellow) flowers. The hillside was covered in broom.
2. a long-handled sweeping brush.

broom

مِكْنَسَة koště kost Besen σκούπα escoba luuta balais metla scopa ほうき bezem kost miotła vassoura веник sopkvast ไม้กวาด süpürge chổi 扫帚
References in classic literature ?
asked Meg one snowy afternoon, as her sister came tramping through the hall, in rubber boots, old sack, and hood, with a broom in one hand and a shovel in the other.
When she took hold of a mop or a broom handle the hands looked like the dried stems of an old creeping vine clinging to a tree.
The little negro girl who worked Madame Lebrun's sewing-machine was sweeping the galleries with long, absent-minded strokes of the broom.
The room itself is cobwebbed, and dingy with old paint; its floor is strewn with grey sand, in a fashion that has elsewhere fallen into long disuse; and it is easy to conclude, from the general slovenliness of the place, that this is a sanctuary into which womankind, with her tools of magic, the broom and mop, has very infrequent access.
What of it, if some old hunks of a sea-captain orders me to get a broom and sweep down the decks?
This man was as hard-tempered and hard-handed as Samson; he always spoke in a rough, impatient voice, and if I did not move in the stall the moment he wanted me, he would hit me above the hocks with his stable broom or the fork, whichever he might have in his hand.
Not right off, of course, for the native of those islands does not, as a rule, dissolve upon the early applications of a humorous thing; but the fifth time I told it, they began to crack in places; the eight time I told it, they began to crumble; at the twelfth repetition they fell apart in chunks; and at the fifteenth they disintegrated, and I got a broom and swept them up.
Nothing easier: the old merchant dragged in the dummy, brushed him off with a broom, stripped him, and shipped the clothes to the hotel.
bout ten year ole dat 'uz good to me, en hadn't no mammy, po' thing, en I loved her en she loved me; en she come out whah I uz' workin' en she had a roasted tater, en tried to slip it to me-- robbin' herself, you see, 'ca'se she knowed de overseer didn't give me enough to eat--en he ketched her at it, en giver her a lick acrost de back wid his stick, which 'uz as thick as a broom handle, en she drop' screamin' on de groun', en squirmin' en wallerin' aroun' in de dust like a spider dat's got crippled.
She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom, and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with.
Every room in the brick house was as neat as wax, and she had only to pull up the shades, go over the floors with a whisk broom, and dust the furniture.
Nor it isn't fields nor mountains, it's just miles and miles and miles of wild land that nothing grows on but heather and gorse and broom, and nothing lives on but wild ponies and sheep.