broomstick

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broom·stick

 (bro͞om′stĭk′, bro͝om′-)
n.
The handle of a broom.

broomstick

(ˈbruːmˌstɪk; ˈbrʊm-)
n
(Tools) the long handle of a broom

broom•stick

(ˈbrumˌstɪk, ˈbrʊm-)

n.
the long slender handle of a broom.
[1675–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.broomstick - the handle of a broombroomstick - the handle of a broom    
broom - a cleaning implement for sweeping; bundle of straws or twigs attached to a long handle
handgrip, handle, grip, hold - the appendage to an object that is designed to be held in order to use or move it; "he grabbed the hammer by the handle"; "it was an old briefcase but it still had a good grip"
Translations
kosteskaft
bezemsteel

broomstick

[ˈbrʊmstɪk] Npalo m de escoba

broomstick

[ˈbruːmstɪk] nmanche m à balai

broomstick

[ˈbrʊmˌstɪk] nmanico di scopa
References in classic literature ?
He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn't worth a mouthful of ashes more than what they was before.
My sons," the Duke of Egypt was saying to his audience, in a falsetto voice, "sorceresses in France go to the witches' sabbath without broomsticks, or grease, or steed, merely by means of some magic words.
All these roses are dwarf; I have only two standards in the whole garden, two Madame George Bruants, and they look like broomsticks.
He nodded grotesquely over his raised legs, like two broomsticks in the pyjamas, with enormous bare feet at the end.
A BROOMSTICK which had long served a witch as a steed complained of the nature of its employment, which it thought degrading.
And Hannibal, snarling, growling, and spitting, ducking his head and with short paw-strokes trying to ward off the insistent broomstick, backed obediently into the corner, crumpled up his hind-parts, and tried to withdraw his corporeal body within itself in a pain-urged effort to make it smaller.
Juozapas had only one leg, having been run over by a wagon when a little child, but he had got himself a broomstick, which he put under his arm for a crutch.
Just as eleven of them had done blessing her, a great noise was heard in the courtyard, and word was brought that the thirteenth fairy was come, with a black cap on her head, and black shoes on her feet, and a broomstick in her hand: and presently up she came into the dining- hall.
In vulgar phrase, she had taken up the broomstick, and was just about to sally from the kitchen, when Jones accosted her with a demand of a gown and other vestments, to cover the half-naked woman upstairs.
It is as useful to a friar as a broomstick to a witch, or a wand to a conjurer.
They both led tramping lives, and this woman in Gerrard-street here had been married very young, over the broomstick (as we say), to a tramping man, and was a perfect fury in point of jealousy.
When his touring in Switzerland is finished, he does not throw that broomstick away, but lugs it home with him, to the far corners of the earth, although this costs him more trouble and bother than a baby or a courier could.