brought


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Related to brought: brought forth, brought out

brought

 (brôt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of bring.

brought

(brɔːt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of bring

bring

(brɪŋ)

v.t. brought, bring•ing.
1. to carry, convey, conduct, or cause (someone or something) to come with, to, or toward the speaker.
2. to cause to come to or toward oneself; attract.
3. to cause to occur or exist: The medicine brought rapid relief.
4. to cause to come into a particular position, state, or effect: to bring a car to a stop.
5. to persuade, compel, or induce: I couldn't bring myself to sell it.
6. to cause to come to mind; evoke; recall: to bring back happy memories.
7. to sell for; fetch: These lamps will bring a good price.
8. Law. to commence: to bring an action for damages.
9. bring about, to accomplish; cause.
10. bring around or round,
a. to convince of a belief or opinion; persuade.
b. to restore to consciousness, as after a faint.
11. bring down,
a. to injure, capture, or kill.
b. to cause to fall.
c. to cause to be in low spirits; depress.
d. Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. to present (a report, bill, etc.) in a parliament.
12. bring forth,
a. to give birth to or produce; bear: to bring forth young.
b. to give rise to; introduce.
13. bring forward,
a. to bring to view; show.
b. to present for consideration; adduce.
14. bring in,
a. to yield, as profits or income.
b. to present officially; submit: to bring in a verdict.
c. to cause to operate or yield: to bring in an oil well.
d. to introduce.
15. bring off, to accomplish, carry out, or achieve.
16. bring on, to cause to happen, appear, or exist: to bring on a headache.
17. bring out,
a. to reveal or expose.
b. to make noticeable or conspicuous; emphasize.
c. to cause to appear: The clams I ate brought out a rash.
d. to publish or produce.
e. to introduce formally into society.
18. bring to,
a. to bring back to consciousness; revive.
b. to head (a vessel) close to or into the wind so as to halt.
19. bring up,
a. to care for during childhood; rear.
b. to introduce or mention for attention or consideration.
c. to vomit.
d. to stop quickly or abruptly.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English bringan]
bring′er, n.
Translations

brought

pret & pp de bring
References in classic literature ?
Meg arranged the tea table, Jo brought wood and set chairs, dropping, over-turning, and clattering everything she touched.
Beth said nothing, but wiped away her tears with the blue army sock and began to knit with all her might, losing no time in doing the duty that lay nearest her, while she resolved in her quiet little soul to be all that Father hoped to find her when the year brought round the happy coming home.
The condition that had brought her to him passed in an illness, but she was like one who has discovered the sweetness of the twisted apples, she could not get her mind fixed again upon the round perfect fruit that is eaten in the city apartments.
Koku was an immense man, a veritable giant, one of two whom Tom had brought back with him after an exciting trip to a strange land.
Make sure S E Y BROUGHT TOYOU INCONJUNCTION WITH MAGAZINE TY LION IP GER MA ?
BROUGHT TO YOU BY The site is attractive, clean and crisp, the pages loaded quickly and it seems very easy to navigate.
In New York State four cases were combined: a case brought by the ACLU, a case brought by Lambda Legal, and two cases brought by individuals in Nyack and Albany.
Shovel them over the bodies you long ago brought down.
Items that can be brought onto the base include cellular phones, low-power family walkie-talkies, diaper bags, strollers and children's wagons and umbrellas.
To address the problem, Syngenta brought in two different vendors charged with discussing the issues and coming up with a methodology that would address all of their concerns.