brown thrasher


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brown thrasher

n.
A North American bird (Toxostoma rufum) related to the mockingbird and having a reddish-brown back and a dark-streaked breast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brown thrasher - common large songbird of eastern United States having reddish-brown plumagebrown thrasher - common large songbird of eastern United States having reddish-brown plumage
mocking thrush, thrasher - thrush-like American songbird able to mimic other birdsongs
References in classic literature ?
Near at hand, upon the topmost spray of a birch, sings the brown thrasher -- or red mavis, as some love to call him -- all the morning, glad of your society, that would find out another farmer's field if yours were not here.
2011), whereas Brown Thrashers and Eastern Towhees are partially migratory--having some populations that breed in the northeast US and winter in the southeast, and other populations that remain in the same region year-round (Hagan 1993, Schlossberg and King 2007)--and have significantly declining populations (Saner et al.
Damn you, trashie," Harry shot at the brown thrasher and laughed at the absurdity of his action and the words describing it.
For those species with more than five nests, grasshopper sparrows, eastern meadowlarks, bobolinks (Dolichanyxaryzivarus) and song sparrows had the greatest overall nest success, while red-winged blackbirds, brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum), and willow flycatchers had the least (Table 1).
For the Yellow Warbler and Brown Thrasher, we found equal proportions of depredated nests for those containing eggs and those with nestlings.
The species with the highest seropositivity (>10% and >1 positive sample) were Rock Doves, Great Horned Owls, Chukar, Northern Cardinals, House Sparrows, and Brown Thrashers.
Moreover, they suggest this may be the same for Brown Thrashers, a member of the same family as Northern Mockingbirds.
However, the same subjects did not respond differently to unaltered Brown Thrasher and mockingbird songs, which makes these results difficult to interpret.
Brown Thrasher nest reuse: a time saving resource, protection from search-strategy predators, or cues for nest-site selection?
One instance involved a Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) usurping a Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) nest in its territory (Nickell 1965).
Predation on snakes by Eastern Bluebird and Brown Thrasher.