bruising


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bruise

 (bro͞oz)
v. bruised, bruis·ing, bruis·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To injure the underlying soft tissue or bone of (part of the body) without breaking the skin, as by a blow.
b. To damage (plant tissue), as by abrasion or pressure: bruised the fruit by careless packing.
2. To dent or mar.
3. To pound (berries, for example) into fragments; crush.
4. To hurt, especially psychologically.
v.intr.
To experience or undergo bruising: Peaches bruise easily.
n.
1. An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
2. A similar injury to plant tissue, often resulting in discoloration or spoilage.
3. A painful feeling caused by or associated with an experience.

[Middle English bruisen, from Old English brȳsan, to crush, and from Old North French bruisier (of Celtic origin).]

bruising

(ˈbruːzɪŋ)
adj
1. (Pathology) causing bruises, as by a blow
2. aggressively antagonistic; hurtful: four months of bruising negotiation.
n
(Pathology) a bruise or bruises
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bruising - causing mental or emotional injury; "a bruising experience"; "protected from the bruising facts of battle"- John Mason Brown
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
2.bruising - brutally forceful and compelling; "protected from the bruising facts of battle"
forceful - characterized by or full of force or strength (often but not necessarily physical); "a forceful speaker"; "a forceful personality"; "forceful measures"; "a forceful plan for peace"

bruising

noun
1. discoloration, marking, swelling, contusion, ecchymosis She had quite a severe bruising and a cut lip.
adjective
1. hard, tough, violent, rough, fierce, ferocious, rumbustious a bruising battle over civil rights
Translations

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ] ADJ [experience] → doloroso, penoso; [match] → durísimo, violento

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ]
adj
(= upsetting) [experience] → douloureux/euse
(= fierce) [battle, campaign, encounter] → éprouvant(e)
n (= bruises) → bleus mpl, contusions fpl

bruising

nPrellungen pl

bruising

[ˈbruːzɪŋ]
1. necchimosi f inv
2. adj (encounter, experience) → brutto/a; (criticism, defeat) → pesante
References in classic literature ?
Even in our own days, when morals are better understood, an execution, a bruising match, a riot, or a meeting of radical reformers, collects, at considerable hazard to themselves, immense crowds of spectators, otherwise little interested, except to see how matters are to be conducted, or whether the heroes of the day are, in the heroic language of insurgent tailors, flints or dunghills.
After bruising myself severely, much to the amusement of the Martians, I again had recourse to creeping, but this did not suit them and I was roughly jerked to my feet by a towering fellow who had laughed most heartily at my misfortunes.
Occasionally we would strike our heads against some projecting limb of a tree; and while imprudently engaged in rubbing the injured part, would fall sprawling amongst filthy fragments, cutting and bruising ourselves, whilst the unpitying waters flowed over our prostrate bodies.
During all this time the ship lay rolling in the trough of the sea, the heavy surges breaking over her, and the spars heaving and banging to and fro, bruising the half-drowned sailors that clung to the bowsprit and the stumps of the masts.
The second time he set out in search, and ended by bruising his nose against a box that certainly spoke with a human tongue, but in no sort of human accent.
Will somebody hand me anything hard and bruising to pelt at her?
As I expected, we found that the flesh underneath was terribly contused, for though the steel links had kept the weapons from entering, they had not prevented them from bruising.
TURAN dashed himself against the door of his prison in a vain effort to break through the solid skeel to the side of Tara whom he knew to be in grave danger, but the heavy panels held and he succeeded only in bruising his shoulders and his arms.
Sometimes he was violent, and we struggled with him, twisting his arms, bruising his flesh, tying him helpless while we sat and panted on him that he might not do harm to us, himself, or the ship.
Lilian, clutching the railing so spasmodically that a bruising hurt was left in her finger-ends for days, gazed horror-stricken at a yellow-haired, wild-eyed giant whom she recognized as the man who was to be her husband.
But that men should wreak their anger on others by the bruising of the flesh and the letting of blood was something strangely and fearfully new to me.
I was alone with him, Marian--his cruel hand was bruising my arm-- what could I do?