brushing


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brush 1

 (brŭsh)
n.
1.
a. An implement typically consisting of bristles fastened into a handle, used in scrubbing, polishing, grooming, or applying a liquid.
b. The act of using this implement.
2.
a. A sweeping stroke of the hand, as in removing something.
b. A light touch in passing; a graze.
c. An instance of contact with something undesirable or dangerous: a brush with the law; a brush with death.
3. A bushy tail: the brush of a fox.
4. A sliding connection completing a circuit between a fixed and a moving conductor.
5. A snub; a brushoff.
v. brushed, brush·ing, brush·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To clean, polish, or groom with a brush: brush one's teeth; brush the dog's coat.
b. To apply with a brush: brushed shellac onto the wood.
c. To remove with a brush or with sweeping strokes: brushed dirt from his pants.
2. To touch lightly in passing; graze against.
v.intr.
1. To use a brush.
2. To make sweeping strokes with the hand.
3. To touch something lightly in moving past.
Phrasal Verbs:
brush aside/off
To dismiss abruptly or curtly: brushed the matter aside; brushed an old friend off.
brush back Baseball
To force (a batter) to move away from the plate by throwing an inside pitch.
brush up
To refresh one's memory or renew one's skill regarding (something).

[Middle English brushe, twigs used as a broom or a brush to clean, painter's brush, from Old French brosse, brushwood, brush; see brush2.]

brush′er n.
brush′y adj.
Synonyms: brush1, glance1, graze2, shave, skim
These verbs mean to make light contact with something in passing: Her arm brushed mine. His fist glanced his opponent's chin. The keel grazed bottom in the shallow water. The front tire shaved the curb. The oars skimmed the pond's surface.

brush 2

 (brŭsh)
n.
1.
a. Dense vegetation consisting of shrubs or small trees.
b. Land covered by such a growth.
2. Cut or broken branches.

[Middle English brushe, from Old French brosse, brushwood, from Vulgar Latin *bruscia, perhaps from Latin bruscum, knot on a maple.]

brush′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.brushing - the act of brushing your teethbrushing - the act of brushing your teeth; "the dentist recommended two brushes a day"
dental care - care for the teeth
2.brushing - the act of brushing your hair; "he gave his hair a quick brush"
hair care, haircare, hairdressing - care for the hair: the activity of washing or cutting or curling or arranging the hair
Translations

brushing

n (dent, etc.) cepillado; bronchial — cepillado bronquial
References in classic literature ?
and did honor to the coming guest by brushing his curly pate, putting on a fresh color, and trying tidy up the room, which in spite of half a dozen servants, was anything but neat.
Into the drug store came Joe Welling, brushing the screen door violently aside.
He stood brushing his hand over his smooth grey hair, as if he were trying to clear away a fog about his head.
returned the disappointed scout; "I heard the imp brushing over the dry leaves, like a black snake, and blinking a glimpse of him, just over ag'in yon big pine, I pulled as it might be on the scent; but 'twouldn't do
The gallant Ichabod now spent at least an extra half hour at his toilet, brushing and furbishing up his best, and indeed only suit of rusty black, and arranging his locks by a bit of broken looking-glass that hung up in the schoolhouse.
Meanwhile, the whale he had struck must also have been on its travels; no doubt it had thrice circumnavigated the globe, brushing with its flanks all the coasts of Africa; but to no purpose.
Do ye see this dent, sir --removing his hat, and brushing aside his hair, and exposing a bowl-like cavity in his skull, but which bore not the slightest scarry trace, or any token of ever having been a wound -- Well, the captain there will tell you how that came here; he knows.
He was lounging in a large easy-chair, looking over some letters that had come in the afternoon mail, and she was standing before her mirror, brushing out the complicated braids and curls in which Eliza had arranged her hair; for, noticing her pale cheeks and haggard eyes, she had excused her attendance that night, and ordered her to bed.
The new boy went off brushing the dust from his clothes, sobbing, snuffling, and occasionally looking back and shaking his head and threatening what he would do to Tom the "next time he caught him out.
Rebecca, on the other hand, had dressed up the dog in John's clothes, and being requested to get the three younger children ready for dinner, she had held them under the pump and then proceeded to "smack" their hair flat to their heads by vigorous brushing, bringing them to the table in such a moist and hideous state of shininess that their mother was ashamed of their appearance.
Three women were got to help; and such scrubbing, such brushing, such washing of paint and beating of carpets, such taking down and putting up of pictures, such polishing of mirrors and lustres, such lighting of fires in bedrooms, such airing of sheets and feather-beds on hearths, I never beheld, either before or since.
And often, from the side of my eye, I could detect her raising a hand, and brushing something off her cheek.