brusque


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brusque

also brusk  (brŭsk)
adj.
Abrupt and curt in manner or speech; discourteously blunt. See Synonyms at gruff.

[French, lively, fierce, from Italian brusco, coarse, rough, from Late Latin brūscum, perhaps blend of Latin rūscus, butcher's broom, and Late Latin brūcus, heather; see briar1.]

brusque′ly adv.
brusque′ness n.

brusque

(bruːsk; brʊsk)
adj
blunt or curt in manner or speech
[C17: from French, from Italian brusco sour, rough, from Medieval Latin bruscus butcher's broom]
ˈbrusquely adv
ˈbrusqueness, brusquerie n

brusque

or brusk

(brʌsk; esp. Brit. brʊsk)

adj.
abrupt in manner; blunt; rough.
[1595–1605; < Middle French < Italian brusco rough, tart, special use of brusco (n.) butcher's broom < Late Latin brūscum, alter. of Latin rūscus, rūscum]
brusque′ly, adv.
brusque′ness, n.
syn: See blunt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.brusque - marked by rude or peremptory shortness; "try to cultivate a less brusque manner"; "a curt reply"; "the salesgirl was very short with him"
discourteous - showing no courtesy; rude; "a distant and at times discourteous young"

brusque

brusque

also brusk
adjective
Rudely unceremonious:
Translations
جافٌّ، خَشِنٌ، فَظٌّ
příkrýprudký
bryskstuds
töykeä
durvanyers
stuttaralegur
grubusšiurkštumas
skarbsstrups
príkry

brusque

[bruːsk] ADJ (brusquer (compar) (brusquest (superl))) [comment, manner etc] → brusco, áspero; [person] → brusco
he was very brusque with meme trató con poca cortesía or con aspereza

brusque

[ˈbrʌsk ˈbruːsk ˈbrʊsk] adj
[person, manner] → brusque
[tone] → sec(sèche), cassant(e)

brusque

adj (+er) person, tone, mannerbrüsk, schroff; replyschroff

brusque

[bruːsk] adj (person, manner) → brusco/a; (tone) → secco/a

brusque

(brusk) , ((American) brask) adjective
blunt and abrupt in manner. a brusque reply.
ˈbrusquely adverb
ˈbrusqueness noun
References in classic literature ?
Any mention of her `works' always had a bad effect upon Jo, who either grew rigid and looked offended, or changed the subject with a brusque remark, as now.
there is something singular about you," said he: "you have the air of a little nonnette; quaint, quiet, grave, and simple, as you sit with your hands before you, and your eyes generally bent on the carpet (except, by-the-bye, when they are directed piercingly to my face; as just now, for instance); and when one asks you a question, or makes a remark to which you are obliged to reply, you rap out a round rejoinder, which, if not blunt, is at least brusque.
One, abrupt, energetic, with loud, brusque manners, curt, rude speech, dark in tone, in hair, in look, terrible apparently, in reality as impotent as an insurrection, represented the republic admirably.
I did not think of asking him for details, and he told me the story roughly in brusque, disconnected sentences.
An assault on our pockets, which in more barbarous times would have been made in the brusque form of a pistol-shot, is quite a well-bred and smiling procedure now it has become a request for a loan thrown in as an easy parenthesis between the second and third glasses of claret.
Even to Polina he was brusque almost to the point of rudeness.
We three remained seated round the table from which the dark maid was removing the cups and the plates with brusque movements.
At first he thought that Dirk was the cause of the disaster, and he was needlessly brusque with him.
Among the men of Philip's year were three or four who were past their first youth: one had been in the Navy, from which according to report he had been dismissed for drunkenness; he was a man of thirty, with a red face, a brusque manner, and a loud voice.
I am awaiting orders to join my new regiment, your excellency," replied Boris, betraying neither annoyance at the prince's brusque manner nor a desire to enter into conversation, but speaking so quietly and respectfully that the prince gave him a searching glance.
I shall not ride any more," said Dorothea, urged to this brusque resolution by a little annoyance that Sir James would be soliciting her attention when she wanted to give it all to Mr.
Marilla, brusque and tearless, pecked Anne's cheek and said she supposed they'd hear from her when she got settled.