bubonic plague


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Related to bubonic plague: septicemic plague, pneumonic plague

bu·bon·ic plague

 (bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk, byo͞o-)
n.
A form of infectious plague that is characterized by the formation of buboes and is transmitted to humans principally by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected rodent, usually a rat.

bubonic plague

n
(Pathology) an acute infectious febrile disease characterized by chills, prostration, delirium, and formation of buboes: caused by the bite of a rat flea infected with the bacterium Yersinia pestis. See also plague

bubon′ic plague′


n.
a severe infection caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, characterized by the formation of buboes at the armpits and groin. Compare Black Death.
[1885–90]

bu·bon·ic plague

(bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk)
The most common form of plague, with symptoms including fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and inflamed lymph nodes (called buboes). It is transmitted by fleas from infected rats or other rodents. The Black Death was an epidemic of bubonic plague. See more at plague.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bubonic plague - the most common form of the plague in humansbubonic plague - the most common form of the plague in humans; characterized by chills, prostration, delirium and the formation of buboes in the armpits and groin; does not spread from person to person
pest, pestilence, pestis, plague - a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animal
ambulant plague, ambulatory plague, pestis ambulans - a mild form of bubonic plague
Black Death, Black Plague - the epidemic form of bubonic plague experienced during the Middle Ages when it killed nearly half the people of western Europe
Translations
peste bubónica
buboninis maras

bubonic plague

[bjuːˌbɒnɪkˈpleɪg] Npeste f bubónica

bubonic plague

nBeulenpest f

bubonic plague

[bjuːˈbɒnɪkˈpleɪg] adjpeste f bubbonica

bu·bon·ic plague

n. peste bubónica.
References in classic literature ?
The man who was immune to yellow fever was carried away by cholera; and if he were immune to that, too, the Black Death, which was the bubonic plague, swept him away.
Then, steering a zigzag course, she fled from us as though we had been the bubonic plague.
Bubonic plague and small-pox were raging, while dysentery and pneumonia were reducing the population, and the railroad was raging worst of all.
With the discovery of the modern plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis, in 1894, the issue seemed resolved: the Black Death was the disease now known as bubonic plague.
He returned with the stick plus bubonic plague, yellow fever, anthrax, gangrene, leprosy and a used condom on each paw.
England has seen two main outbreaks of bubonic plague over the centuries.
including the effects of the bubonic plague and the Thirty Years' War; and the peek through the screen in the convent walls, especially when considering how many young women were thrust into this life of extreme poverty and seclusion by families with no other recourse.
In The Disordered Body, Hatty and Hatty argue that the "bodily disorders" associated with the three epidemics of leprosy; bubonic plague, and syphilis during the period from the tenth to the seventeenth centuries were the main catalysts that led to the Cartesian separation of mind and body.
Just as the garbage that collected in streets during the Middle Ages sustained rats and the bubonic plague they spread, DNA piling up in dead or dying cells creates an environment conducive to systemic lupus erythematosus, or lupus.
Scientist Dr Oya Alpar, of Aston University, has helped develop a vaccine against the bubonic plague - a disease that doctors fear could re-emerge to terrorise the world.
Second, KBMA vaccines may have a role in protection from bioterror agents such as anthrax, tularemia and bubonic plague, where a live bacterial vaccine would be inappropriate due to safety concerns.