bubonic plague


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Related to bubonic plague: septicemic plague, pneumonic plague

bu·bon·ic plague

 (bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk, byo͞o-)
n.
A form of infectious plague that is characterized by the formation of buboes and is transmitted to humans principally by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected rodent, usually a rat.

bubonic plague

n
(Pathology) an acute infectious febrile disease characterized by chills, prostration, delirium, and formation of buboes: caused by the bite of a rat flea infected with the bacterium Yersinia pestis. See also plague

bubon′ic plague′


n.
a severe infection caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, characterized by the formation of buboes at the armpits and groin. Compare Black Death.
[1885–90]

bu·bon·ic plague

(bo͞o-bŏn′ĭk)
The most common form of plague, with symptoms including fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and inflamed lymph nodes (called buboes). It is transmitted by fleas from infected rats or other rodents. The Black Death was an epidemic of bubonic plague. See more at plague.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bubonic plague - the most common form of the plague in humansbubonic plague - the most common form of the plague in humans; characterized by chills, prostration, delirium and the formation of buboes in the armpits and groin; does not spread from person to person
pest, pestilence, pestis, plague - a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animal
ambulant plague, ambulatory plague, pestis ambulans - a mild form of bubonic plague
Black Death, Black Plague - the epidemic form of bubonic plague experienced during the Middle Ages when it killed nearly half the people of western Europe
Translations
peste bubónica
buboninis maras

bubonic plague

[bjuːˌbɒnɪkˈpleɪg] Npeste f bubónica

bubonic plague

nBeulenpest f

bubonic plague

[bjuːˈbɒnɪkˈpleɪg] adjpeste f bubbonica

bu·bon·ic plague

n. peste bubónica.
References in classic literature ?
The man who was immune to yellow fever was carried away by cholera; and if he were immune to that, too, the Black Death, which was the bubonic plague, swept him away.
Then, steering a zigzag course, she fled from us as though we had been the bubonic plague.
Bubonic plague and small-pox were raging, while dysentery and pneumonia were reducing the population, and the railroad was raging worst of all.
They were believed to be bubonic plague victims but research led by a team from the Edinburgh City Council have dated them back to the 6th century.
pestis to invade the lymph nodes and blood, creating the bubonic plague that caused pandemics like the 14th century's Black Death.
The Duchess of Cornwall looked at the sodden article, which Murray had catapulted into the royal box after his win against Robin Haase, like it was a rat with bubonic plague.
She became severely ill while administering medicine to Gikondi residents who had contracted bubonic plague.
However, plague bacteria were found in the same place where a hotbed of bubonic plague was detected in 2013 - Sary-Jaz area of Ak-Suu district, Issyk-Kul region.
However, Dr Loretta Wade isn't convinced this case is as straightforward as it first seems, and she eventually identifies the cause of death as bubonic plague.
For example, patients who had primary bubonic plague and secondary pneumonic plague were classified as having bubonic plague.
If diagnosed early, bubonic plague can be treated with antibiotics.
And if you eat on a Wednesday, technically you're breaking the law as under a 1665 order the first Wednesday of every month is a day of fasting and penance for the relief of Bubonic plague in London.