buccaneer

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buc·ca·neer

 (bŭk′ə-nîr′)
n.
1. A pirate, especially one of the freebooters who plundered Spanish shipping in the West Indies during the 17th century.
2. A ruthless speculator or adventurer.
intr.v. buc·ca·neered, buc·ca·neer·ing, buc·ca·neers
1. To plunder shipping; act as a buccaneer.
2. To show boldness and enterprise, as in business, often in a reckless or unscrupulous way.

[French boucanier, from boucaner, to cure meat, from boucan, barbecue frame, of Tupian origin; akin to Tupí mukém, rack.]
Word History: When it is first attested in the middle of the 17th century, the French word boucanier, later borrowed into English as buccaneer, referred to French traders on the islands of Hispaniola and Tortuga. The traders hunted the feral cattle and boars on the islands for their hides, and they smoked the meat in a barbecue frame known in French as a boucan. The French word came from the Tupí word for a wooden rack used for roasting. The original barbecuing buccaneers subsequently adopted a more remunerative way of life, piracy, which accounts for the modern meanings of the English word.

buccaneer

(ˌbʌkəˈnɪə)
n
(Historical Terms) a pirate, esp one who preyed on the Spanish colonies and shipping in America and the Caribbean in the 17th and 18th centuries
vb (intr)
to be or act like a buccaneer
[C17: from French boucanier, from boucaner to smoke meat, from Old French boucan frame for smoking meat, of Tupian origin; originally applied to French and English hunters of wild oxen in the Caribbean]

buc•ca•neer

(ˌbʌk əˈnɪər)

n.
a pirate, esp. one who raided Spanish colonies and ships along the American coast in the second half of the 17th century.
[1655–65; < French boucanier, literally, barbecuer]

buccaneer


Past participle: buccaneered
Gerund: buccaneering

Imperative
buccaneer
buccaneer
Present
I buccaneer
you buccaneer
he/she/it buccaneers
we buccaneer
you buccaneer
they buccaneer
Preterite
I buccaneered
you buccaneered
he/she/it buccaneered
we buccaneered
you buccaneered
they buccaneered
Present Continuous
I am buccaneering
you are buccaneering
he/she/it is buccaneering
we are buccaneering
you are buccaneering
they are buccaneering
Present Perfect
I have buccaneered
you have buccaneered
he/she/it has buccaneered
we have buccaneered
you have buccaneered
they have buccaneered
Past Continuous
I was buccaneering
you were buccaneering
he/she/it was buccaneering
we were buccaneering
you were buccaneering
they were buccaneering
Past Perfect
I had buccaneered
you had buccaneered
he/she/it had buccaneered
we had buccaneered
you had buccaneered
they had buccaneered
Future
I will buccaneer
you will buccaneer
he/she/it will buccaneer
we will buccaneer
you will buccaneer
they will buccaneer
Future Perfect
I will have buccaneered
you will have buccaneered
he/she/it will have buccaneered
we will have buccaneered
you will have buccaneered
they will have buccaneered
Future Continuous
I will be buccaneering
you will be buccaneering
he/she/it will be buccaneering
we will be buccaneering
you will be buccaneering
they will be buccaneering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been buccaneering
you have been buccaneering
he/she/it has been buccaneering
we have been buccaneering
you have been buccaneering
they have been buccaneering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been buccaneering
you will have been buccaneering
he/she/it will have been buccaneering
we will have been buccaneering
you will have been buccaneering
they will have been buccaneering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been buccaneering
you had been buccaneering
he/she/it had been buccaneering
we had been buccaneering
you had been buccaneering
they had been buccaneering
Conditional
I would buccaneer
you would buccaneer
he/she/it would buccaneer
we would buccaneer
you would buccaneer
they would buccaneer
Past Conditional
I would have buccaneered
you would have buccaneered
he/she/it would have buccaneered
we would have buccaneered
you would have buccaneered
they would have buccaneered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buccaneer - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nationbuccaneer - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
Barbary pirate, corsair - a pirate along the Barbary Coast
despoiler, freebooter, looter, pillager, plunderer, raider, spoiler - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
sea king - a Viking pirate chief
Verb1.buccaneer - live like a buccaneer
live - lead a certain kind of life; live in a certain style; "we had to live frugally after the war"

buccaneer

noun pirate, privateer, corsair, freebooter, sea-rover the villainous buccaneer with the peg-leg and the parrot
Translations
قُرصان
bukanýr
sørøver
sjóræningi
korsaraspiratas
jūras laupītājspirāts
korzár

buccaneer

[ˌbʌkəˈnɪəʳ]
A. N (Hist) → bucanero m (fig) → emprendedor(a) m/f
B. VIpiratear

buccaneer

[ˌbʌkəˈnɪər] n
(= pirate) → flibustier m
(British) (in business)flibustier m

buccaneer

nSeeräuber m; (= ship)Piratenschiff nt

buccaneer

[ˌbʌkəˈnɪəʳ] nbucaniere m

buccaneer

(bakəˈniə) noun
a type of pirate.
References in classic literature ?
I had several men who died in my ship of calentures, so that I was forced to get recruits out of Barbadoes and the Leeward Islands, where I touched, by the direction of the merchants who employed me; which I had soon too much cause to repent: for I found afterwards, that most of them had been buccaneers.
It is certain that the old gentleman, who had lived in days gone by with that feminine nation now as much forgotten as many other great things,--like the Jesuits, the Buccaneers, the Abbes, and the Farmers-General,--had acquired an irresistible good- humor, a kindly ease, a laisser-aller devoid of egotism, the self- effacement of Jupiter with Alcmene, of the king intending to be duped, who casts his thunderbolts to the devil, wants his Olympus full of follies, little suppers, feminine profusions--but with Juno out of the way, be it understood.
His heart leaped with joy, for he doubted not they were the private marks of the buccaneers.
I forget whether I have told you that there was a stave on the rock, driven into it by some buccaneers of long ago to mark the site of buried treasure.
But THE HORNET was run by a set of clean-shaven, strapping young men, frank buccaneers who robbed everything and everybody, not excepting one another.
From that time I became, in an anonymous way, one of the young buccaneers of British Caricature; cruising about here, there and everywhere, at all my intervals of spare time, for any prize in the shape of a subject which it was possible to pick up.
The war of the buccaneers of 1490 was so recent that it could not fail being alluded to; the English pirates had, they said, most shamefully taken their ships while in the roadstead; and the Councillor, before whose eyes the Herostratic* event of 1801 still floated vividly, agreed entirely with the others in abusing the rascally English.
It was a sea-fitting for the buccaneers and pirates of by-gone years.
The buccaneer on the wave might relinquish his calling and become at once if he chose, a man of probity and piety on land; nor, even in the full career of his reckless life, was he regarded as a personage with whom it was disreputable to traffic or casually associate.
And so,' he said, gaily, 'we abandon this buccaneer life tomorrow, do we?
It's the name of a buccaneer of my acquaintance; and I call you by it for the sake of shortness, and what I have to say to you is this; one glass of rum won't kill you, but if you take one you'll take another and another, and I stake my wig if you don't break off short, you'll die-- do you understand that?
He had a handsome face, thin, ascetic, with dark eyes; he wore his fantastic garb with the dashing air of a buccaneer.