buck up


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buck 1

 (bŭk)
n.
1.
a. A male deer.
b. The male of various other mammals, such as antelopes, kangaroos, mice, or rabbits.
c. Antelope considered as a group: a herd of buck.
2.
a. A robust or high-spirited young man.
b. A fop.
3. Offensive A Native American or black man.
4. An act or instance of bucking: a horse that unseated its rider on the first buck.
5.
a. Buckskin.
b. bucks Buckskin breeches or shoes.
v. bucked, buck·ing, bucks
v.intr.
1. To leap upward arching the back: The horse bucked in fright.
2. To charge with the head lowered; butt.
3. To make sudden jerky movements; jolt: The motor bucked and lurched before it finally ran smoothly.
4. To resist stubbornly and obstinately; balk.
5. Informal To strive with determination: bucking for a promotion.
v.tr.
1. To throw or toss by bucking: buck off a rider; bucked the packsaddle off its back.
2. To oppose directly and stubbornly; go against: "Los Angeles County, the most populous county in the country, is bucking the trend" (American Demographics).
3. Football To charge into (an opponent's line) carrying the ball.
4. To butt against with the head.
adj.
Of the lowest rank in a specified military category: a buck private; a buck sergeant.
Phrasal Verb:
buck up
To summon one's courage or spirits; hearten: My friends tried to buck me up after I lost the contest.

[Middle English bukke, from Old English buc, male deer, and bucca, male goat.]

buck′er n.

buck 2

 (bŭk)
n.
1. A sawhorse or sawbuck.
2. A leather-covered frame used for gymnastic vaulting.

[Alteration (influenced by buck) of Dutch bok, male goat, trestle, from Middle Dutch boc.]

buck 3

 (bŭk)
n. Informal
1. A dollar.
2. An amount of money: working overtime to make an extra buck.

[Short for buckskin (from its use in trade).]

buck 4

 (bŭk)
n.
1. Games A counter or marker formerly passed from one poker player to another to indicate an obligation, especially one's turn to deal.
2. Informal Obligation to account for something; responsibility: tried to pass the buck for the failure to his boss.
tr.v. bucked, buck·ing, bucks Informal
To pass (a task or duty) to another, especially so as to avoid responsibility: "We will see the stifling of initiative and the increased bucking of decisions to the top" (Winston Lord).
Idiom:
the buck stops here Informal
The ultimate responsibility rests here.

[Short for buckhorn knife (from its use as a marker in poker).]

buck up

vb (adverb)
1. to make or cause to make haste
2. to make or become more cheerful, confident, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.buck up - gain courage
cheer, embolden, hearten, recreate - give encouragement to

buck

verb
To take a stand against:
phrasal verb
buck up
To impart strength and confidence to:
Translations
يُسرعيُشجّـع
hodit sebouvzchopit se
live opopmuntreskynde sig
drífa sighressast, taka gleîi sína
acele etmekelini çabuk tutmakneşelen mek

w>buck up

(inf)
vi
(= hurry up)sich ranhalten (inf), → rasch or fix machen (inf); buck up!halt dich ran! (inf)
(= cheer up)aufleben; buck up!Kopf hoch!
vt sep
(= make hurry)Dampf machen (+dat) (inf)
(= make cheerful)aufmuntern
to buck one’s ideas upsich zusammenreißen (inf)

buck

(bak) noun
the male of the deer, hare, rabbit etc. a buck and a doe.
verb
(of a horse or mule) to make a series of rapid jumps into the air.
ˈbuckskin noun, adjective
(of) a soft leather made of deerskin or sheepskin.
buck up
1. to hurry. You'd better buck up if you want to catch the bus.
2. to cheer up. She bucked up when she heard the news.
pass the buck
to pass on responsibility (to someone else). Whenever he is blamed for anything, he tries to pass the buck.