bucket


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buck·et

 (bŭk′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A cylindrical vessel used for holding or carrying liquids or solids; a pail.
b. The amount that a bucket can hold: One bucket of paint will be enough for the ceiling.
2. A unit of dry measure in the US Customary System equal to 2 pecks (17.6 liters).
3. A receptacle on various machines, such as the scoop of a power shovel or the compartments on a water wheel, used to gather and convey material.
4. Basketball A basket.
v. buck·et·ed, buck·et·ing, buck·ets
v.tr.
1. To hold, carry, or put in a bucket: bucket up water from a well.
2. To ride (a horse) long and hard.
v.intr.
1. To move or proceed rapidly and jerkily: bucketing over the unpaved lane.
2. To make haste; hustle.
Idiom:
a drop in the bucket
An insufficient or inconsequential amount in comparison with what is required.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman buket, from Frankish *būk, belly, hollow thing, from Proto-Germanic *būkaz (also the source of German Bauch, belly), perhaps ultimately of imitative origin (suggesting the notion of inflation or distension).]

bucket

(ˈbʌkɪt)
n
1. an open-topped roughly cylindrical container; pail
2. Also called: bucketful the amount a bucket will hold
3. (Mechanical Engineering) any of various bucket-like parts of a machine, such as the scoop on a mechanical shovel
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a cupped blade or bucket-like compartment on the outer circumference of a water wheel, paddle wheel, etc
5. (Computer Science) computing a unit of storage on a direct-access device from which data can be retrieved
6. (Mechanical Engineering) chiefly US a turbine rotor blade
7. Austral and NZ an ice cream container
8. kick the bucket slang to die
vb, -kets, -keting or -keted
9. (tr) to carry in or put into a bucket
10. (often foll by: down) (of rain) to fall very heavily: it bucketed all day.
11. chiefly (often foll by: along) Brit to travel or drive fast
12. (tr) chiefly Brit to ride (a horse) hard without consideration
13. (tr) slang Austral to criticize severely
[C13: from Anglo-French buket, from Old English būc; compare Old High German būh belly, German Bauch belly]

buck•et

(ˈbʌk ɪt)
n.
1. a deep, cylindrical container, usu. of metal, plastic, or wood, with a flat bottom and a semicircular bail.
2.
a. any of the scoops in certain types of conveyors or elevators.
b. the scoop or clamshell of a steam or power shovel.
c. a vane or blade of a waterwheel, paddle wheel, or the like.
v.t.
3. to lift, carry, or handle in a bucket (often fol. by up or out).
v.i.
4. Chiefly Brit. to move or drive fast.
Idioms:
1. drop in the bucket, a small, inadequate amount.
2. kick the bucket, Slang. to die.
[1250–1300; Middle English buket < Anglo-French < Old English bucc, variant of būc vessel, belly]

bucket


Past participle: bucketed
Gerund: bucketing

Imperative
bucket
bucket
Present
I bucket
you bucket
he/she/it buckets
we bucket
you bucket
they bucket
Preterite
I bucketed
you bucketed
he/she/it bucketed
we bucketed
you bucketed
they bucketed
Present Continuous
I am bucketing
you are bucketing
he/she/it is bucketing
we are bucketing
you are bucketing
they are bucketing
Present Perfect
I have bucketed
you have bucketed
he/she/it has bucketed
we have bucketed
you have bucketed
they have bucketed
Past Continuous
I was bucketing
you were bucketing
he/she/it was bucketing
we were bucketing
you were bucketing
they were bucketing
Past Perfect
I had bucketed
you had bucketed
he/she/it had bucketed
we had bucketed
you had bucketed
they had bucketed
Future
I will bucket
you will bucket
he/she/it will bucket
we will bucket
you will bucket
they will bucket
Future Perfect
I will have bucketed
you will have bucketed
he/she/it will have bucketed
we will have bucketed
you will have bucketed
they will have bucketed
Future Continuous
I will be bucketing
you will be bucketing
he/she/it will be bucketing
we will be bucketing
you will be bucketing
they will be bucketing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bucketing
you have been bucketing
he/she/it has been bucketing
we have been bucketing
you have been bucketing
they have been bucketing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bucketing
you will have been bucketing
he/she/it will have been bucketing
we will have been bucketing
you will have been bucketing
they will have been bucketing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bucketing
you had been bucketing
he/she/it had been bucketing
we had been bucketing
you had been bucketing
they had been bucketing
Conditional
I would bucket
you would bucket
he/she/it would bucket
we would bucket
you would bucket
they would bucket
Past Conditional
I would have bucketed
you would have bucketed
he/she/it would have bucketed
we would have bucketed
you would have bucketed
they would have bucketed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bucket - a roughly cylindrical vessel that is open at the topbucket - a roughly cylindrical vessel that is open at the top
cannikin - a wooden bucket
dinner bucket, dinner pail - a pail in which a workman carries his lunch or dinner
dredging bucket - a bucket for lifting material from a channel or riverbed
kibble - an iron bucket used for hoisting in wells or mining
slop jar, slop pail - a large pail used to receive waste water from a washbasin or chamber pot
vessel - an object used as a container (especially for liquids)
water wheel, waterwheel - a wheel that rotates by direct action of water; a simple turbine
wine bucket, wine cooler - a bucket of ice used to chill a bottle of wine
2.bucket - the quantity contained in a bucket
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
Verb1.bucket - put into a bucket
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
2.bucket - carry in a bucket
carry, transport - move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"

bucket

noun
1. pail, container, pitcher, scuttle We drew water in a bucket from a well outside the door.
plural noun
1. loads, floods, oceans He was weeping buckets.
verb (often with down) pour down, rain heavily, lash down, pelt down, come down in torrents, teem down, torrent As soon as we were inside, the rain began to bucket down.
kick the bucket die, expire, perish, pass away, buy it (U.S. slang), check out (U.S. slang), kick it (slang), croak (slang), give up the ghost, go belly-up (slang), snuff it (slang), peg out (informal), buy the farm (U.S. slang), peg it (informal), decease, cark it (Austral. & N.Z. slang), pop your clogs (informal), breathe your last, hop the twig (slang) I don't plan on kicking the bucket for another thirty years.

bucket

verb
Translations
دَلْوسَطْل، دَلْو
kbelíkkýblvědro
spand
sitelo
ämberpang
ämpäriämpärillinenkauhakotterosangollinen
kabaokanta
vedervödör
fata
バケツ
버킷
hamasitula
kibiras
spainis
vedro
vedro
hink
ndoo
ถัง

bucket

[ˈbʌkɪt]
A. Ncubo m, balde m (LAm); (child's) → cubito m; [of waterwheel etc] → cangilón m
a bucket of waterun cubo or (LAm) un balde de agua
to rain bucketsllover a cántaros
to weep bucketsllorar a mares
see also kick B1
B. VI
1. (= hurtle) → ir a toda velocidad, ir a toda pastilla (Sp)
2. the rain is bucketing down it's bucketing (down)está lloviendo a cántaros
C. CPD bucket seat Nasiento m envolvente
bucket shop N (Fin) → agencia f de bolsa fraudulenta (Brit) (for air tickets) → agencia f de viajes que vende barato

bucket

[ˈbʌkɪt] nseau m
to kick the bucket → casser sa pipe
bucket down
vi (British) to bucket down
The rain is bucketing down → Il pleut à verse., Il tombe des cordes.

bucket

n (also of dredger, grain elevator) → Eimer m; (of excavator, water wheel)Schaufel f; a bucket of waterein Eimer mWasser; to weep or cry buckets (inf)wie ein Schlosshund heulen (inf); it’s coming down in buckets (US inf) → es gießt or schüttet wie aus or mit Kübeln (inf) ? kick, drop
vi (Brit inf) it’s bucketing!, the rain is bucketing (down)!es gießt or schüttet wie aus or mit Kübeln (inf)

bucket

:
bucket seat
nSchalensitz m
bucket shop
n (Fin) → unreelle Maklerfirma, Schwindelmakler m; (= travel agency)Agentur ffür Billigreisen
bucketwheel
n (Tech) → Schöpfrad nt

bucket

[ˈbʌkɪt]
1. nsecchio; (large) → secchia
2. vi (Brit) (fam) the rain is bucketing (down)piove a catinelle

bucket

(ˈbakit) noun
a container for holding water, milk etc. We carried water in buckets to the burning house.

bucket

دَلْو kbelík spand Eimer κουβάς balde, cubo ämpäri seau kanta secchio バケツ 버킷 emmer bøtte wiadro balde ведро hink ถัง kova

bucket

n. cubeta, cubo, balde.
References in classic literature ?
A chanting cherub adorned the cover of the sugar bucket, and attempts to portray Romeo and Juliet supplied kindling for some time.
asked Tom of Professor Bumper one day, when the latter was at the top of a shaft waiting for a bucket load of dirt to be hoisted up.
The mouth of that mine goes right into the face of the cliff, and they used to put us in a bucket and run us over on a trolley and shoot us into the shaft.
A negro accompanied him, bearing a bucket of water and a flask of wine.
These last now hoist the bucket within grasp of the Indian, to whom another person has reached up a very long pole.
The next evening Nicodemus waylaid George and poured a bucket of ice-water over him.
I took all the coffee and sugar there was, and all the ammunition; I took the wadding; I took the bucket and gourd; I took a dipper and a tin cup, and my old saw and two blankets, and the skillet and the coffee-pot.
Tom appeared on the sidewalk with a bucket of whitewash and a long-handled brush.
I HAD led this life about a month, when the man with the wooden leg began to stump about with a mop and a bucket of water, from which I inferred that preparations were making to receive Mr.
Which I do assure you, Pip," he would often say, in explanation of that liberty; "I found her a tapping the spare bed, like a cask of beer, and drawing off the feathers in a bucket, for sale.
Here, however, sat Eppie, discoursing cheerfully to her own small boot, which she was using as a bucket to convey the water into a deep hoof-mark, while her little naked foot was planted comfortably on a cushion of olive-green mud.
It was a master surgeon, him that ampytated me--out of college and all--Latin by the bucket, and what not; but he was hanged like a dog, and sun-dried like the rest, at Corso Castle.